Pro ADO.NET with VB .NET 1.1 / Edition 1

Pro ADO.NET with VB .NET 1.1 / Edition 1

4.5 2
by Kevin Hoffman, Fabio Claudio Ferracchiati, Matt Milner, Sahil Malik
     
 

ISBN-10: 1590594347

ISBN-13: 9781590594346

Pub. Date: 11/04/2004

Publisher: Apress

Calling all Visual Basic .NET programmers and web developers! This highly anticipated book provides thorough instruction for using ADO.NET, supported with numerous relevant code examples and extensive technical information. So whether you’re developing web applications using ASP.NET, Windows Forms applications, or XML Web Services, you’ll become adept

Overview

Calling all Visual Basic .NET programmers and web developers! This highly anticipated book provides thorough instruction for using ADO.NET, supported with numerous relevant code examples and extensive technical information. So whether you’re developing web applications using ASP.NET, Windows Forms applications, or XML Web Services, you’ll become adept at maximizing .NET's data access technology.

Topics include: ADO.NET data architecture; data readers, adapters, and DataSets; safer development with XML Schemas; data relationships; and ADO.NETs built-in support and performance optimization. With such valuable content, you’ll come to master a solution-oriented approach to ADO.NET.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590594346
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
11/04/2004
Series:
From Professional to Expert Series
Edition description:
2005
Pages:
628
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.14(d)

Table of Contents

A table of contents is not available for this title.

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Pro ADO.NET with VB .NET 1.1 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are looking for plenty of code samples on how to use ADO.NET this is the book for you. There are some very good samples that show the various classes that make up the ADO.NET library such as connection, data set, data adapter, and data reader. I even found lots of good information in the caution and tips. I could have used one of the cautions presented in chapter 1 when I was first writing ADO.NET code instead of spending a day trying to figure it out. This book gives a very good in depth examination of all of the major components of ADO.NET and not just an overview. I was really surprised by the amount of sample code. Although I have been using ADO.NET for about three years now there was still information in here that I did not know and that I was able to use and take advantage of some features that I did not know about. I found Chapter 13 on performance and security to be a great chapter. I am always looking for ways to improve application performance and there are a lot of good tips within this chapter including a discussion of caching and connection pooling. Finally I will soon be using Chapter 14 Integration and Migration to help migrate thousands of lines of VB 4 thru VB6 code to VB.NET. To me the biggest leap from VB6 to VB.NET was ADO.NET. Not only from the perspective of learning all of the new classes that replace the ADO functionality that you know and love but also migrating the code. This chapter showed how challenging it will be to migrate many applications over to VB.NET but provides tips and examples which was great. Overall this was a great ADO.NET book, again just full of sample code. I like a book that explains concepts and shows examples while not just being a reference guide to the classes. This book definitely fulfilled my requirements.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The many authors of this book show how to use ADO if you are coding in a .NET environment, and need to access a database. The authors chose to have the example code in VB.NET 1.1. Though they might equally well have used examples in C#. Perhaps they felt that VB has a broader allure? Conceptually, the role of ADO is simple. It is a layer between your application and the database. It gives you standard ways to read and write data, largely independent of the actual database. Java programmers will recognise this as similar to JDBC drivers. But while the concept is simple, the book shows that the details of how to use it from your application can be nontrivial. To some of you, who are interested in developing Web Services, there is an entire chapter devoted to showing how you can do this. Where the Web Service has a database and its access of this database is mediated by ADO. The chapter tells how to build a Web Service from scratch, using ADO. A nice comprehensive approach that you should be able to easily adapt to a specific Web Service of your design.