Pro JavaFX 8: A Definitive Guide to Building Desktop, Mobile, and Embedded Java Clients [NOOK Book]

Overview

In Pro JavaFX 8 expert authors show you how to use the JavaFX platform to create rich-client Java applications. You'll discover how you can use this powerful Java-based UI platform, which is capable of handling large-scale data-driven business applications for PC as well as now mobile and embedded devices.

Covering the JavaFX API, development tools, and best practices, this book provides code examples that explore the exciting new features provided with JavaFX 8 which comes as ...

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Pro JavaFX 8: A Definitive Guide to Building Desktop, Mobile, and Embedded Java Clients

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Overview

In Pro JavaFX 8 expert authors show you how to use the JavaFX platform to create rich-client Java applications. You'll discover how you can use this powerful Java-based UI platform, which is capable of handling large-scale data-driven business applications for PC as well as now mobile and embedded devices.

Covering the JavaFX API, development tools, and best practices, this book provides code examples that explore the exciting new features provided with JavaFX 8 which comes as part of Oracle's new Java (SE) 8 release. This book also contains engaging tutorials that cover virtually every facet of JavaFX development and reference materials on JavaFX that augment the JavaFX API documentation.

After reading and using this book, you'll have the authoritative knowledge that should give you an edge in your next JavaFX-based application projects for your job or your clients.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781430265757
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 7/23/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 616
  • Sales rank: 866,620
  • File size: 7 MB

Meet the Author

Jim Weaver is an author, speaker, teacher, and developer in rich Internet application technologies such as JavaFX, and may be contacted at jim.weaver@javafxpert.com.
Weiqi Gao is a principal software engineer with Object Computing, Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri. He has more than 15 years of software development experience and has been using Java technology since 1998. He is interested in programming languages, object-oriented systems, distributed computing, and graphical user interfaces. He is a member of the steering committee of the St. Louis Java Users Group. Weiqi holds a Ph.D. in mathematics.
Open-source developer and agile manager Stephen Chin is founder of numerous open-source projects including WidgetFX and JFXtras, and senior manager at Inovis in Emeryville, California. He has been working with Java desktop and enterprise technologies for more than a decade, and has a passion for improving development technologies and process. Stephen's interest in Java technologies has lead him to start a Java- and JavaFX- focused blog that is targeted at early technology adopters (SteveOnJava.com).
Dean Iverson has been writing software professionally for more than 15 years. He is employed by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, where he is a senior researcher and rich client application developer. He also has a small software consultancy called Pleasing Software Solutions, which he co-founded with his wife.
Johan Vos is a Java Champion who started to work with Java in 1995. As part of the Blackdown team, he helped port Java to Linux. With LodgON, the company he cofounded, he has been mainly working on Java-based solutions for social networking software. His main focus is on end-to-end Java, combining the strengths of backend systems and embedded devices. His favorite technologies are currently Java EE/Glassfish at the backend and JavaFX at the frontend. He contributes to a number of open source projects, including DataFX and the Android port of JavaFX. Johan’s blog can be followed at http://blogs.lodgon.com/johan, he tweets at http://twitter.com/johanvos, and can be reached at johan@lodgon.com.
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Table of Contents

1. Getting a Jump Start in JavaFX 8

2. Creating a User Interface in JavaFX 8

3. Using SceneBuilder to create a User Interface

4. Properties and Bindings

5. Building Dynamic UI Layouts in JavaFX

6. Using the JavaFX UI Controls

7.Collections and Concurrency

8. Creating Charts in JavaFX

9. Using the media classes

10. JavaFX 3D

11. Accessing Web Services

12. Java on Embedded, Mobile and Tablet

13. JavaFX languages and markup

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Customer Reviews

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  • Posted December 30, 2014

    Now that I have finished reading every chapter in this book exce

    Now that I have finished reading every chapter in this book except Chapters 8 and 10, which concern Charts and 3D features respectively, I believe this is an excellent treatise on JavaFX 8, a revolutionary new Java GUI. I had become interested in JavaFX many years ago but never got past the JavaFX Script Language. Thankfully, Oracle deprecated the script language and made JavaFX 8 programmable by Java, and in turn, every language that can run on a JVM. So if you are a Java developer, you can jump right in to this technology reading this book. 

    From my .NET experience, JavaFX 8 has very similar designs to WPF in the .NET world. Both allow their GUIs to be programmed either in an XML based language (FXML or XAML respectively) or programmatically in their respective languages (Java or C# code respectively). Also, both allow cross embedding with their original GUIs (Swing or WinForms respectively) in both directions. However, JavaFX 8 has several improvements that WPF does not: JavaFX 8 is cross platform, running on any platform that can host a JRE 8, and can be used on ARM as well as x86 architectures. Unlike Silverlight, there is no Lite version of JavaFX 8, so code written for JavaFX 8 is fully portable to any platform. And RoboVM is a promising new technology that enables Apps written in JavaFX 8 to be compiled to run on iOS and Mac OS X without a JRE. There are several such Apps on the iOS App store. The closest comparison of this in the .NET world is Mono, for which WPF is not supported yet. So JavaFX 8 has significant advantages to WPF and is definitely a viable technology in today's mobile centered world.

    This book got me over the learning curve fast, and I was able to develop signage software in JavaFX 8 for embedded devices, including both ARM and x86 architectures, after reading this book. At 588 pages, it provides decent coverage of the technology and points you in the direction to learning more. One key thing it mentions is that JavaFX 8 requires Java 8, because it uses Lambdas and other Java 8 additions heavily throughout its APIs. This is a key difference between it and JavaFX 2, its predecessor. Java 8 is a revolution in the Java world. A time traveler from 2000 who was expert in Java might not recognize Java 8 code as Java. But a quick refresher in Java 8 would quickly bring him up-to-speed with 20-teens way of Java development, as the changes in Java 8 make things easier, far easier than the old way. Conversely, a Java developer who learned Java today would probably be hard pressed to understand the old way, were he to travel back in time to the turn of the millennium.

    This is currently the book to get to understand in depth JavaFX 8 by reading a book. It covers a lot, and then gives you ideas on where to go from there. If you come from a Swing development background, know that Swing is nothing like JavaFX 8. Development in JavaFX 8 is very easy and intuitive, and this book provides many code examples and explanations on how to do this. One chapter is devoted to writing the GUIs in FXML, and the rest show the JavaFX 8 GUIs written in Java code. It also explains the similarities of the two approaches, showing that if you know one way, the other way is easy to figure out, if you learn the simple patterns. This book explains these. Also, the book shows how to mix and match code using both methods, allowing you to mix FXML and Java GUIs together. Once you learn the JavaFX 8 way, you will never want to go back to Swing development.

    If you were looking for a cross platform technology and all you found was C++ or HTML5, this book now adds JavaFX 8 to that list and gets you up-to-speed quickly. If you are an iOS developer learning Swift, I suggest considering JavaFX 8 as well, and to research RoboVM. Swift is a great new language, but it confines your code to iOS/Mac OS X. With JavaFX 8 and RoboVM, you can now target iOS and Mac OS X with ahead-of-time compiled Apps that run faster than Objective-C, and similar in speed to C coded Apps, and then still use the same code for Apps on all other platforms.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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