Pro SQL Server 2000 Database Design: Building Quality OLTP Databases

Overview

Database design is one of the most contentious issues in computer science. There is always a delicate balance to be struck between the strict academic rules that govern the design of relational databases and the real-world techniques that programmers apply to get the job done in a certain time frame. This book's goal is to coverfrom a "real-world" point of viewall of the essential elements in designing, modeling, and building efficient relational databases, while avoiding a dry,...

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Paperback (2004)
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Overview

Database design is one of the most contentious issues in computer science. There is always a delicate balance to be struck between the strict academic rules that govern the design of relational databases and the real-world techniques that programmers apply to get the job done in a certain time frame. This book's goal is to coverfrom a "real-world" point of viewall of the essential elements in designing, modeling, and building efficient relational databases, while avoiding a dry, theoretical approach.

Author Louis Davidson explains the process of implementing a database—from generating tables and allowing access to these tables using Microsoft SQL Server 2000. This includes tackling data modeling (focusing on the IDEF1X notation), requirements gathering, normalization (beyond the Third Normal Form), and implementing tables, constraints, triggers, procedures, user-defined functions, and so on. Davidson provides a full and realistic case study that clearly illustrates the entire process, from the initial discussions of a client's needs, through development of a logical model, to a complete implementation of the system.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590593028
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 1/22/2004
  • Edition description: 2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 592
  • Product dimensions: 1.23 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 9.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Louis Davidson has been in the IT industry for more than 15 years as a corporate database developer and architect. He has spent the majority of his career working with Microsoft SQL Server, beginning from the early days of version 1.0. He has a bachelor s degree from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga in computer science, with a minor in mathematics. Louis is the data architect for Compass Technology (Compass.net) in Chesapeake, Virginia, leading database development on their suite of nonprofit oriented CRM products, built on the Microsoft CRM platform and SQL Server technologies.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2004

    design and implementation

    How much do you already know about designing and implementing a SQL database? That is really two questions. The first refers to applying a well trodden theory of SQL design to your application. What tables should you conceptually extract? How should these be interrelated by judicious choice of primary and foreign keys? What are the germane attributes in each table? All these issues are explained by Davidson in the first part of the book. He goes well into discussing how to normalise data, and the numerous normal forms. He does this at a level independent of SQL Server. So even if your database is dB2 or Oracle or whatever, you should be able to profitably gain something from his teachings. But having designed your database, now comes having to implement it. The second part of the book. Here is the SQL Server specific material. The details specific to its implementation do matter. But you know what? A fair amount of the examples use mostly standard SQL commands. In your application, you should probably strive to do likewise, to the maximum extent possible. It minimises the amount of inevitable lockin to SQL Server. There are also sections in the second part that apply to any relational database. Like his description of best practices, in chapter 13. Davidson presents a useful balance between design and implementation. A favourable contrast to texts that predominently deal with only one aspect.

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