×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Problems of Form
     

Problems of Form

by Dirk Baecker (Editor), Michael Irmscher (Translator), Leah Edwards (Translator)
 

See All Formats & Editions


Sociology has long sought to find out how acting in a situation and observing that situation may differ and nevertheless belong to a single kind of social operation. George Spencer-Brown's Laws of Form (1969) provides one way to conceive of such an operation. The present book is the first to make sociological use of his mathematical calculus of form, which

Overview


Sociology has long sought to find out how acting in a situation and observing that situation may differ and nevertheless belong to a single kind of social operation. George Spencer-Brown's Laws of Form (1969) provides one way to conceive of such an operation. The present book is the first to make sociological use of his mathematical calculus of form, which has been extensively applied to cybernetics, systems theory, cognitive science, and mathematics.

Spencer-Brown's theory states that any action or communication is always an operation that makes a distinction. Not only does this operation take place, but it can be observed as indicating what it is interested in, and as leaving unmarked what it is not. Distinctions thereby entail a logic of inclusion and exclusion that is subject to social debate and conflict. In social situations there is no action that does not at the same time execute, maintain, or cross a distinction.

Thus the observer is part of the situation he or she observes. The essays in this volume use this idea to describe different social "forms" as consisting of action observed by further action. A "form" here is understood to be the two sides of a distinction and its dividing line, taken together. All social action, therefore, consists of three values: marked side, unmarked side, and an operation separating the two. If one watches the third value, one ends up observing the observer drawing the distinction—an observer who, of course, may be oneself.

In this collection, more general essays study the consequences of such an understanding of form for our conceptions of literature, paradox, sign, play, and language. Other essays focus on the observations necessary to construct such forms as money, the university, the state, a career, or sickness. All the essays share an interest in problems ensuing from the fact that though one can observe the form of a distinction and become aware of its arbitrary, contingent, and discriminatory nature, one nevertheless, when trying to act or communicate, must choose a distinction. The essays show how social situations deftly veil the arbitrariness of the distinctions that constitute their forms.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Editor Baecker (sociology and management, Witten/Herdecke U., Germany) provides an extended introduction to this collection of 12 essays (most by German sociologists, a few from other fields or countries), which share as a theme the analytical approach proposed by George Spencer-Brown in his 1969 . Spencer-Brown's mathematical calculus of form has not been applied previously to sociology, although it has been applied to cybernetics, systems theory, cognitive science, and mathematics. Among the topics addressed: self-reference in literature, sign, logic, language, early money, the university, protest in the new social movements, and illness. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780804734240
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
Publication date:
08/28/1999
Series:
Writing Science Series
Edition description:
1
Pages:
260
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author


Dirk Baecker is Professor of Sociology and Management at Witten/Herdecke University. He is the author, most recently, of Poker im Osten.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews