Producer to Producer: A Step-By-Step Guide to Low Budgets Independent Film Producing [NOOK Book]

Overview

Complete guide for Producers for film and tv projects
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Producer to Producer: A Step-By-Step Guide to Low Budgets Independent Film Producing

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Overview

Complete guide for Producers for film and tv projects
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781615930722
  • Publisher: Wiese, Michael Productions
  • Publication date: 4/6/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 424
  • Sales rank: 582,503
  • File size: 5 MB

Table of Contents

Foreword

Acknowledgements

Introduction

How This Book Works and Whom it is For

1 Development 1

Finding the Idea or Material 2

Study Scripts 2

Development Process 3

Obtaining Rights to Underlying Material 3

Screenplay Creation and Revision 6

Screenwriting Software 15

Getting Feedback on the Script 15

Script Doctors 17

Writer's Guild of America 17

Log Line --- Don't Leave Home Without It 17

Log Line Creation 18

Creating a Proposal 20

Proposal Examples 25

IMDB. com 48

Creating a Pitch 48

Producing a Trailer 50

Distribution Plan 52

Presales 53

Sales Agents 54

Deliverables 54

Development Wrap Up 55

Final Checklist Before Deciding to Produce the Film 55

2 Script Breakdown 57

Nuts and Bolts 58

Breakdown Details 59

Breakdown for Red Flag Script 60

Filling in the Breakdown Sheet 73

Breakdown Analysis for Red Flag 76

Creating a Tentative Schedule 77

How Many Days to Shoot? 77

Final Analysis of Red Flag 79

Using the Breakdown to Adjust Your Script 79

3 Budgeting 82

Budgeting Overview 82

Everything but the Kitchen Sink 84

Budgeting Software 84

Budget Breakdown 93

Estimated Budget 95

Spreadsheet Mechanics 96

Geography of the Budget 96

Top Sheet 97

Creating the Estimated Budget 98

Detailed Line Items 99

Labor considerations 108

Labor rates and Most Favored Nations 109

Sections A & B (line # 1-50, #51-100) 110

Section C #101-113 Pre-Production/Scouting Expenses 112

Section D #114-139 Location Expenses 113

Section E #140-148 Props/Wardrobe/SFX 115

Section F #151-167 Studio Rental and Expenses 116

Section G #168-180 Set Construction Labor 116

Section H #181-192 Set Construction Materials 117

Section I #193-210 Equipment Rental 117

Section J #211-217 Film Stock, Videotape Stock and Digital Media 119

Section K #218-226 Miscellaneous Costs 120

Section L #227-233 Creative Fees 120

Section M #234-270 Talent Fees 120

Section N #271-276 Talent Expenses 121

Section P #277-322 Postproduction 121

Cash Flow 123

Working Budget 123

Padding and Contingency 124

Budget Actualization 124

Tax Resale Certificates 125

Tax Incentives/Credits 125

4 Funding 127

Pre-sales 127

Sales Agents 128

Equity Investors 129

Deferred Payment Deals 130

Union Signatory Film Agreements 130

Other Funding Options 131

Community Involvement 133

How to Ask for Donations and Discounts 133

Grants 135

Fundraising Trailers 136

Find a Mentor or Executive Producer 136

Beware of Credit Cards as a Way of Funding Your Film's Budget 136

5 Casting 139

Hiring a Casting Director 139

Attaching an Actor or "Star" to Your Film 141

Pay-or-Play Deal 142

Attaching Talent and Casting Without a Casting Director 143

The Casting Process 144

Auditions/Casting Sessions 144

Callbacks 145

Extras Casting 146

Casting Schedule 147

To Be Union or Not to Be Union 147

Union Paperwork 149

6 Preproduction 150

Production Triangle 150

Need to Get the Money in the Bank 151

Preproduction Countdown 152

Preproduction Countdown Explanations 154

7 Locations 200

Finding Locations 200

Create Location Lists 200

The Specifics of Location Scouting 201

Location Folders 202

Check with Local Film Commissions for Leads 202

Alternatives to Hiring a Location Scout 203

Finalizing Location Decisions 204

Negotiating the Deal 206

Back-up Locations 207

Paperwork 207

Location Release Form 207

General Liability Insurance Certificate 208

Co-ops and Condos 208

Permits 209

Police/Fire/Sheriff's Departments 210

Tech Scout 210

Shoot-day Protocol 210

Run Through with Owner 210

Leave It Better Than You Found It 211

Idiot Check 211

The Day After the Location Shoot 212

Tax Incentive Programs 212

8 Legal 214

It's All About Rights 215

It's All About Liability 215

Breakdown of a Legal Document 216

Legal Concepts 217

List of Agreements During Each Phase 218

Legal Corporate Entities 221

Never Sign Anything Without Proper Legal Advice 222

Your Lawyer Is an Extension of You 223

Attorney As Financier/Executive producer/Producer's Rep 224

9 Insurance 225

Why Do You Need Insurance? 225

Common Insurance Policies 226

Completion Bond/Guaranty 232

How Do You Obtain Insurance? 233

How Insurance Brokers Work 234

Certificate Issuance 234

Insurance Audits 235

What to do When You Have a Claim? 236

Things You Should Know 236

Never Go into Production Without Insurance 237

10 Scheduling 239

Overview 239

Script Breakdown 240

Element Sheet Creation 240

Creating the Shooting Schedule 250

Scheduling Principles 251

Scheduling Steps 253

Stripboard Creation 254

Day-Out-of-Days Schedule 257

Scheduling each shoot day --- how do you know how long something will take to shoot? 261

Feed your crew every 6 hours and other union regulations that affect the day's schedule 262

Portrait of an Assistant Director 263

Locking the Schedule 264

11 Production 266

The night before your first day of principal photography 266

First Day of Principal Photography 268

Wrap Checklist 272

Budget Actualization 275

Second Day Disasters 275

Enemy of the Production 275

Cigars and Fine Chocolates 277

12 Wrap 280

Wrapping Out 280

Lost/Missing/Damaged 281

Deposit Checks and Credit Card Authorizations 281

Actualized Budget 282

Budget Analysis 291

Petty Cash 291

Wrap Paperwork 291

Wrap Party 292

13 Postproduction 294

Picking a Format 295

High Definition and Standard Definition Video 296

Camera Test 296

Telecine/Color Correct/Transfer 297

Types of Color Correct 298

Film-to-Tape vs. Tape-to-Tape Color Correct vs. Digital Intermediate (DI) Session 300

CODEC Is King 300

Postproduction Sample Workflows 301

How to Put Together a Postproduction Team 314

Preplanning Is Essential 315

Deliverables 316

Editorial Notes 318

Work-in-Progress Screenings 318

14 Audio 322

Sound Recording During Principal Photography 322

How to Get the Best Sound on Set 323

Room Tone 324

Wild Sound 325

Audio Postproduction 325

Building Audio Tracks/Sound Design 325

Adding Sound Effects 326

Creating and Recording Foley Work 326

Recording ADR 326

Laying in Music Tracks 327

Sound Mixing 327

Dolby DigitalTM, DTSTM, or THXTM 328

Layback 329

15 Music 330

Creating a Music Soundtrack 330

What Rights Do You Need? 331

Putting in the License Request 333

Music Rights Request Letter Format 334

Negotiating for the Music Rights 335

Most Favored Nation 336

Out of Copyright or Public Domain Music 337

Fair Use 338

E&O Insurance 338

Blanket TV Agreements 338

Music Cue Sheet 339

Cease and Desist 339

What Happens if You Can't Find the Copyright Holder? 340

Music Rights Clearance Person/Company 340

Original Music Composition for Your Project 341

Music Libraries and Royalty Free Music 341

Music Supervisors 342

16 Archive Materials 344

Archive and Research 344

Steps to Acquire and Use Archive in Your Film 345

Archive Researcher 346

Archive Libraries 346

National Archives 347

Fair Use 347

Archive Usage and Negotiation 348

License Paperwork 349

Cease and Desist 349

17 Marketing/Publicity 351

Press Kit 352

Screeners 361

Website 361

Online Social Networking 362

Blogs 362

Media Outreach 363

How to Hire a Publicist 363

IMDb.com 364

18 Film Festivals 365

Fee Waivers and Screening Fees 366

Film Festival Strategy 367

Film Festival Premieres 370

Oscar Eligibility 370

Other Awards 371

Film Festivals vs. Film Markets 371

In or Out of Competition 371

What to Expect from a Film Festival 372

Posters, Postcards, and Photos 373

Technical Issues at Festivals 373

Jury and Audience Awards 374

19 Distribution/Sales 376

Sales Agents 377

International Sales 379

Theatrical/Television Sales 379

Home Video/VOD Sales 379

Deliverables 379

Self Distribution 380

Future Distribution Models 380

20 What's Next? 384

Index 386

About the Author 393

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