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Product Experience

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Overview

The book brings together research that investigates how people experience products: durable, non-durable, or virtual. In contrast to other books, the present book takes a very broad, possibly all-inclusive perspective, on how people experience products. It thereby bridges gaps between several areas within psychology (e.g. perception, cognition, emotion) and links these areas to more applied areas of science, such as product design, human-computer interaction and marketing.

The field of product experience research will include some of the research from four areas: Arts, Ergonomics, Technology, and Marketing. Traditionally, each of these four fields seems to have a natural emphasis on the human (ergonomics and marketing), the product (technology) or the experience (arts). However, to fully understand human product experience, we need to use different approaches and we need to build bridges between these various fields of expertise

*Most comprehensive collection of psychological research behind product design and usability
*Consistenly addresses the 3 components of human-product experience: the human, the product, and the experience
*International contributions from experts in the field

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780080450896
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 12/31/2007
  • Pages: 688
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 10.09 (h) x 1.51 (d)

Table of Contents

Preliminary TOC

Preface

Introduction (H.N.J. Schifferstein & P. Hekkert)

Part I: From the human perspective

IA. Senses
1. On the visual appearance of objects (Harold T. Nefs)
2. The tactual experience of objects (M.H. Sonneveld and H.N.J. Schifferstein)
3. The experience of product sounds (R. van Egmond)
4. Taste, smell and chemesthesis in product experience (Armand V. Cardello and Paul Wise)
5. Multisensory product experience (H.N.J. Schifferstein and C. Spence)

IB. Capacities & skills
6. Human capability and product design (John Clarkson)
7. Connecting design with cognition at work (David D. Woods and Axel Roesler)
8. Designing for expertise (Axel Roesler and David D. Woods)

Part II: From the interaction perspective

9. Holistic perspectives on the design of experience (Gerald C. Cpuchik and Michelle C. Hilscher)
IIA. The aesthetic experience
10. Product aesthetics (P. Hekkert and Helmut Leder)
11. Aesthetics in interactive products: correlates and consequences of beauty (M. Hassenzahl)
IIB. The experience of meaning
12. Meaning in product use - a design perspective (Stella Boss and Heimrich Hanis)
13. Product expression: bridging the gap between the symbolic and the concrete (T.J.L. van Rompay)
14. Semantics: meanings and contexts of artefacts (Klaus Krippendorff and Reinhart Butter)

IIC. The emotional experience
15. Product emotion (P.M.A. Desmet)
16. Consumption emotions (Marsha L. Richins)

IID. Specific experiences and approaches
17. Product attachment: design strategies to stimulate the emotional bonding to products (Ruth Mugge, Jan P.L. Schoormans, and Hendrik N.J.Schifferstain)
18. Crucial elements of designing for comfort (Peter Vink and MIchiel P. de Looze)
19. Co-experience: product experience as social interaction (Katja Battarbee and Ilpo Koskinen)
20. Affective meaning: the Kansei Engineering approach (Simon Schutte, Jorgen Eklund, S. Ishihara, and M. Nagamachi)

Part III: From the product perspective

IIIA. Digital products
21. The useful interface experience: the role and transformation of usability (John M. Carroll and Helena M. Mentis)
22. The experience of intelligent products (David Keyson)
23. The game experience (Jeroen Jansz)

IIIB. Non-durables
24. Experiencing food products within a physical and social context (Herbert Meiselman)
25. The mediating effects of the appearance of nondurable consumer goods and their packaging on consumer behavior (Larry Garber, Eva M. Hyatt, and Unal O. Boya)

IIIB. Environments
26. Office experiences (Christina Bodin Danielsson)
27. The shopping experience (Ann Marie Fiore)
Closing reflections (H.N.J. Schifferstein and P. Hekkert)

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