The Production and Processing of Inorganic Materials / Edition 1

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More About This Textbook

Overview

Guiding readers from the significance, history, and sources of materials to advanced materials and processes, this second edition textbook looks at the production and primary processing of inorganic materials, such as ceramics, metals, silicon, and some composite materials. The text encourages instructors to teach the production of all types of inorganic materials as one. While recognizing the differences between producing various types of materials, the authors focus on the commonality of thermodynamics, kinetics, transport phenomena, phase equilibria and transformation, process engineering, and surface chemistry to all inorganic materials.

The text focuses on fundamentals and how fundamentals can be applied to understand how the major inorganic materials are produced and the initial stages of their processing. Understanding of these fundamentals will equip students for engineering future processes for producing materials or for studying the processing of the many less common materials not examined in this text.

The text is intended for use in an undergraduate course at the junior or senior level, but will also serve as a useful introductory and reference work for graduate students and practicing scientists and engineers.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780873395410
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 10/1/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 548
  • Sales rank: 1,055,924
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface.

1 SIGNIFICANCE, HISTORY, AND SOURCES OF MATERIALS.

1.1 What materials are and their importance.

1.2 Historical summary.

1.3 Materials at present.

1.4 The earth as the source of materials.

1.5 Mining.

1.6 Mineral processing.

1.7 Concluding remarks.

2 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS.

2.1 Introduction.

2.2 Reversibility (or otherwise) of changes.

2.3 Entropy.

2.4 Free energy.

2.5 Equilibrium.

2.6 Significance of Ellingham diagrams.

2.7 Predominance (Pourbaix) diagrams.

2.8 Physical equilibria.

2.9 Concluding remarks.

3 REACTION KINETICS.

3.1 Introduction and some definitions.

3.2 Rate equations.

3.3 Temperature effects.

3.4 Mass transport and heterogeneous reactions.

3.5 The case of the disappearing solid.

3.6 The case of the shrinking core.

3.7 Concluding remarks.

4 POWDERS AND PARTICLES

4.1 Introduction.

4.2 Characterization of particles.

4.3 Characterization of agglomerates and compacts.

4.4 Concluding remarks.

5 SURFACES AND COLLOIDS.

5.1 Significance of colloids in materials processing.

5.2 Surface structure.

5.3 Colloid interactions.

5.4 Concluding remarks.

6 FUNDAMENTALS OF HEAT TREATMENT AND SINTERING.

6.1 Introduction.

6.2 Transport of matter.

6.3 Phase equilibria.

6.4 Kinetics of phase changes.

6.5 Sintering: an introductionX.

6.6 Concluding remarks.

7 PROCESS ENGINEERING.

7.1 Introduction.

7.2 Material and enthalpy balances.

7.3 Recycles.

7.4 Staged operations.

7.5 Heat balances.

7.6 Supply of heat to unit operations.

7.7 Process control.

7.8 Concluding remarks.

8 HIGH-TEMPERATURE PROCESSING FOR THE PRODUCTION OF METALS AND GLASS.

8.1 Introduction.

8.2 Thermodynamic considerations.

8.3 Kinetic considerations and selectivity.

8.4 Roasting.

8.5 Reduction of oxides.

8.6 Smelting and converting of sulfides.

8.7 Steelmaking: preliminary refining technologies.

8.8 Glassmaking.

8.9 Concluding remarks.

9 HYDROMETALLURGY AND ELECTROMETALLURGY.

9.1 Introduction.

9.2 Leaching.

9.3 Solution purification.

9.4 Electrometallurgy.

9.5 Concluding remarks.

10 REFINING, SOLIDIFICATION, AND FINISHING OF METALS.

10.1 Refining and alloying of metals.

10.2 Solidification of metals.

10.3 Finishing operations.

10.4 Concluding remarks.

11 PRODUCTION OF POWDERS

11.1 Introduction.

11.2 Mechanical methods for powder production.

11.3 Production of powders from solutions.

11.4 Production of powders by solid-solid and gas-solid reactions.

11.5 Production of metal powder.

11.6 Production of other important ceramic powders.

11.7 Concluding remarks.

12 POWDER COMPACTION

12.1 Introduction.

12.2 Packing of particles.

12.3 Powder compaction.

12.4 Die compaction.

12.5 Isostatic compaction.

12.6 Casting methods.

12.7 Extrusion methods.

13 SINTERING OF POWDER COMPACTS.

13.1 Introduction.

13.2 The sintering process.

13.3 Sintering mechanisms.

13.4 Driving forces for sintering.

13.5 Densification by grain boundary diffusion.

13.6 Densification by volume diffusion.

13.7 Creep of porous solids and the shape factor F.

13.8 Interrelation of various transport mechanisms: sintering maps.

13.9 Densification of heterogeneous powder compacts: differential densification.

13.10 Liquid-phase sintering.

13.11 Concluding remarks.

14 MICROSTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT DURING SINTERING.

14.1 Introduction.

14.2 Grain growth.

14.3 Pore evaluation during densification.

14.4 Pore movement and pore breakaway.

14.5 Concluding remarks.

15 DENSIFICATION TECHNOLOGY.

15.1 Introduction.

15.2 Free sintering or pressureless sintering.

15.3 Pressure assisted sintering.

15.4 Concluding remarks.

16 ADVANCED MATERIALS AND PROCESSES.

16.1 Introduction.

16.2 Rapid solidification.

16.3 Production of silicon.

16.4 Zone refining.

16.5 Chemical vapor deposition.

16.6 Preparation of composite materials from liquid metals.

16.7 Surface modification processes.

APPENDIX.

INDEX.

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