Overview

Professional Ajax 2nd Edition provides a developer-level tutorial of Ajax techniques, patterns, and use cases. The book begins by exploring the roots of Ajax, covering how the evolution of the web and new technologies directly led to the development of Ajax techniques. A detailed discussion of how frames, JavaScript, cookies, XML, and XMLHttp requests (XHR) related to Ajax is included. After this introduction, the book moves on to cover the implementation of specific Ajax techniques. Request brokers such as ...
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Professional Ajax

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Overview

Professional Ajax 2nd Edition provides a developer-level tutorial of Ajax techniques, patterns, and use cases. The book begins by exploring the roots of Ajax, covering how the evolution of the web and new technologies directly led to the development of Ajax techniques. A detailed discussion of how frames, JavaScript, cookies, XML, and XMLHttp requests (XHR) related to Ajax is included. After this introduction, the book moves on to cover the implementation of specific Ajax techniques. Request brokers such as hidden frames, dynamic iframes, and XHR are compared and contrasted, explaining when one method should be used over another. To make this discussion clearer, a brief overview of HTTP requests and responses is included.

Once a basic understanding of the various request types is discussed, the book moves on to provide in-depth examples of how and when to use Ajax in a web site or web application. Different data transmission formats, including plain text, HTML, XML, and JSON are discussed for their advantages and disadvantages. Also included is a discussion on web services and how they may be used to perform Ajax techniques. Next, more complex topics are covered. A chapter introducing a request management framework explores how to manage all of the requests inside of an Ajax application. Ajax debugging techniques are also discussed.

Professional Ajax 2nd edition is written for Web application developers looking to enhance the usability of their web sites and web applications and intermediate JavaScript developers looking to further understand the language. Readers should have familiarity with XML, XSLT, Web Services, PHP or C#, HTML, CSS.

Professional Ajax 2nd edition adds nearly 200 pages of new and expanded coverage compared to the first edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
If you’re an experienced programmer who wants to do serious work with Ajax, Professional Ajax was written for you.

Wrox’s authors start with a fast-paced summary of what Ajax can do, the elements of an Ajax solution, and what makes a good Ajax application (for example: minimum server traffic, familiar user interaction, broad accessibility).

Next, they illuminate three Ajax communication options, including hidden frames, iFrames, and XMLHttp requests. You’ll find practical examples of each. The authors also identify pitfalls that require careful programming, including JavaScript’s “same origin policy” security restrictions, and browser caching issues.

Before you dive too far into coding, they introduce several emerging patterns for effective Ajax development: communication control patterns such as “Submission Throttling,” and “fallback” patterns for dealing with server errors and failed client requests.

You’re now ready to see how far Ajax can take you. You’ll build, integrate, and test a web-based Ajax RSS reader: client-side and server-side components, and the links between them. You’ll learn how to use Ajax with web services. There’s a full chapter on using JSON, a lightweight data interchange format that many folks prefer to XML (and is now supported by many Yahoo! APIs). You’ll create four small “web widgets,” and then construct a larger mail application, from architecture to user interface.

Professional Ajax thoroughly illuminates both client and server issues, using server-side examples ranging from PHP to .NET. It even offers a taste of three promising Ajax frameworks: JPSpan, DWR, and Ajax.NET. By the time you’re done, you’ll know how to take Ajax to the limit. Bill Camarda, from the April 2006 Read Only

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118169377
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 8/15/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 624
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Nicholas C. Zakas has a BS in Computer Science from Merrimack College and an MBA from Endicott College. He is the author of Professional JavaScript for Web Developers (Wiley 2005), Professional Ajax (1st and 2nd editions, Wiley 2007 and 2007) as well as several online articles. Nicholas works for Yahoo! as a frontend engineer and has worked in web development for more than 6 years, during which time he has helped develop web solutions in use at some of the largest companies in the world. Nicholas can be reached through his web site at nczonline.net.

Jeremy McPeak began tinkering with web development as a hobby in 1998. Currently working in the IT department of a school district, Jeremy has experience developing web solutions with JavaScript, PHP, and C#. He has written several online articles covering topics such as XSLT, WebForms, and C#.

Joe Fawcett started programming in the 1970s and worked briefly in IT after leaving full-time education. He then pursued a more checkered career before returning to software development in 1994. In 2003, he was awarded the title Microsoft Most Valuable Professional in XML for community contributions and technical expertise. Joe currently works in London as a developer for The Financial Training Company, which provides professional certifications and business training.

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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 What is Ajax? 1
Ch. 2 Ajax basics 15
Ch. 3 Ajax patterns 47
Ch. 4 XML, XPath, XSLT 81
Ch. 5 Syndication with RSS/Atom 125
Ch. 6 Web services 157
Ch. 7 JSON 191
Ch. 8 Web site widgets 227
Ch. 9 AjaxMail 281
Ch. 10 Ajax frameworks 347
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2006

    Outstanding platform-agnostic look at Ajax programming

    The book does a good job academically of showing how Ajax has evolved (itself a debatable topic) and how it is used in modern-day applications. The book doesn't marry the reader to any one particular web development framework, effectively citing examples in PHP, .NET, and JavaServer Pages. Practically, the authors exhibit a proper mix of (X)HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Dynamic HTML and XmlHttpRequests, showing how the technologies are blended for developing next-gen UIs. There are great discussions of advanced concepts like JSON, REST, and SOAP-based web services and how Ajax is incorporated into them. Also, coding to allow cross-browser compatibility is stressed throughout the book, particularly in instantiating an XMLHTTP object across IE, Firefox, Mozilla and Safari. The authors' zXml and XParser are cited as two of several third-party libraries to seamlessly pull this off. Some gems that I found within the book include Chapter 8 - 'Web Site Widgets', which is very helpful, giving practical demonstrations and usable code for several Ajax-driven mini-applications we could all use in our web projects. Chapter 7's case study of a Google Suggest-style autocomplete text box was very elegant, using JSON as an alternative to XML's typically verbose payload. Chapter 2 - 'Ajax Patterns' also abstracts many of the features common to apps using Ajax (i.e., polling, autosave, incremental updating). All are well done and greatly appreciated. Syntactically, the authors' programming style is very clever. While not exhaustively described, the book shows how to feign object-oriented programming in client-side JavaScript, making liberal use of such time-saving coding tricks like faux classes, inline function definitions and prototypes. In criticism, the one chapter I found to be a letdown was Chapter 5 - 'RSS/Atom', mainly because I'm very involved with work in that space. A terse description of content syndication is presented, but then followed exclusively by an analysis the FooReader.NET web-based RSS aggregator app. It's nice, but doesn't take a more holistic view of how Ajax is being used elsewhere. I would have also liked to see examples in emerging platforms, specifically Ruby on Rails and the Ajax support built directly into that web framework. But overall this is a very good introductory read for experienced programmers wanting to get up to speed on the next big thing in advanced web UI development. I'm a better, more aware, more prepared developer for having read it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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