Professional ASP.NET MVC 1.0

Overview

This book begins with you working along as Scott Guthrie builds a complete ASP.NET MVC reference application. He begins NerdDinner by using the File->New Project menu command within Visual Studio to create a new ASP.NET MVC Application. You'll then incrementally add functionality and features. Along the way you’ll cover how to create a database, build a model layer with business rule validations, implement listing/details data browsing, provide CRUD (Create, Update, Delete) data form entry support, implement ...

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Overview

This book begins with you working along as Scott Guthrie builds a complete ASP.NET MVC reference application. He begins NerdDinner by using the File->New Project menu command within Visual Studio to create a new ASP.NET MVC Application. You'll then incrementally add functionality and features. Along the way you’ll cover how to create a database, build a model layer with business rule validations, implement listing/details data browsing, provide CRUD (Create, Update, Delete) data form entry support, implement efficient data paging, reuse UI using master pages and partials, secure the application using authentication and authorization, use AJAX to deliver dynamic updates and interactive map support, and implement automated unit testing.

From there, the bulk of the rest of the book begins with the basic concepts around the model view controller pattern, including the little history and the state of the MVC on the web today. We'll then go into the ways that MVC is different from ASP.NET Web Forms. We'll explore the structure of a standard MVC application and see what you get out of the box. Next we dig deep into routing and see the role URLs play in your application. We'll deep dive into controllers and views and see what role the Ajax plays in your applications. The last third of the book focuses entirely on advanced techniques and extending the framework.

In some places, we assume that you're somewhat familiar with ASP.NET WebForms, at least peripherally. There are a lot of ASP.NET WebForms developers out there who are interested in ASP.NET MVC so there are a number of places in this book where we contrast the two technologies. Even if you're not already an ASP.NETdeveloper, you might still find these sections interesting for context, as well as for your own edification as ASP.NET MVC may not be the web technology that you're looking for.

It’s worth noting, that ASP.NET MVC is not a replacement for ASP.NET Web Forms (aka just "ASP.NET"). Many web developers have been giving a lot of attention to other web frameworks out there (Ruby on Rails, Django) which have embraced the MVC (Model-View-Controller) application pattern, and if you’re one of those developers, or even if you’re just curious, this book is for you.

MVC allows for (buzzword alert!) a "greater separation of concerns" between components in your application. The book goes into the ramifications of this, but if it had to be said it in a quick sentence: ASP.NET MVC is ASP.NET Unplugged. ASP.NET MVC is a tinkerer’s framework that gives you very fine-grained control over your HTML and Javascript, as well as complete control over the programmatic flow of your application.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470384619
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 5/11/2009
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 456
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 23, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    ASP.NET MVC 1.0

    This book is for web developers who are looking to add more complete testing to their web sites, and who are perhaps ready for something different. In some places, we assume that youre somewhat familiar with ASP.NET Web Forms, at least peripherally. There are a lot of ASP.NET Web Forms developers out there who are interested in ASP.NET MVC, so there are a number of places in this book where they talk about both technologies. Even if you are not already an asp.net developer, you might still find these sections interesting for context as well as for your edification. This book goes into the out-of-the-box experience you will have with asp.net mvc but more importantly youll learn practical ways that you can extend asp.net mvc with your own magic. My favorite chapter is chapter 4 it digs deep into the routing to describe the role that URL's play in your application and how routing figures into that.

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  • Posted December 8, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Intro Book Pressional Not as Much

    I was really looking forward to this book to be a testament on the internal details of MVC as all of the authors are accomplished individual authors, however I feel there was a lot to be desired and somehow the author's missed the mark of this being a professional look at MVC. It is a great introductory text, however the subject matter is very light in areas that most programmers that are coming from the web forms world will notice off the bat. They tried to include best practices like getting used to testing, but I feel like the unit tests I was creating more of just an exercise in futility instead of dictating the scope of the development.

    They did include some more detail then most introductory books would on View engines and Controller Factories, however I felt a lot of the information was bland and really poorly organized into the whole. I felt like I was out of sorts on some of the methodologies that were used. Rather than being a book that focused on loose coupling allot of the book focused on tight coupling of components. While repositories were discussed, allot of the content seemed make me have the wrong interpretation of what a repository or service layer is. I felt like it was the opposite of Sanderson's book to where it was more about marketing more Microsoft tools. Then it was about teaching me about meaningful MVC application design and best practices. Another major complaint I had about the book was the brevity of it, I would of preferred the author's go into detail a bit more. I know they were trying to create a community work with first chapter being under creative commons, but if you look at the length of the book its rather small and the details are not so fine grained.

    In a professional book this just not seem to be it, especially with a technology that was just released. I have been to each of the author's blog and I read them somewhat occasionally and the details and passion that they enthuse into their blogs was just not realized into this book. Most of the book sounds like it was written by one person and nothing really speaks of best practices. I would of hopped with such a "coming together" of industry pro's they would of left us with more than a manual but an actual treasure trove on suggestions on what to do with this new MVC goodness.

    It just was not fluid and seemed more like a beginner programmer book where they introduce the technology and bring in a application you can create with the tool, and tell you some minute advanced detail. It just did not fit the bill of being "professional".

    The book did have some bright spots, I thought that the Nerd Dinner was kind of cool to see the development lifecyle of the application. However, it left me with that feeling on why is this useful?
    It just did not seem like a natural example that programmers might find themselves in. I kind of wish it was more intense then some invite system.

    Overall the book is a OK read and I rate it 7 out of 10.

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  • Posted June 9, 2009

    Great insight into the how and why of ASP.NET MVC

    About 5 years ago I was introduced to the MVC pattern by way of a proprietary framework written in PHP. So I was already familiar with the basic concepts and jumped into ASP.NET MVC head first without reading anything except code examples. I had downloaded the NerdDinner.com chapter and source code when it first came out, but with only one monitor it's tough to work with an eBook alongside Visual Studio. Having already started coding 3 new web projects using ASP.NET MVC, this book couldn't have come along at a better time. There were several areas where I was stuck or didn't quite get how to do something or had guessed and was able to work through all those issues.

    This book was written by the guys that designed and built ASP.NET MVC. You get to see exactly how they envisioned it to work. My favorite feature in this book is the Product Team Aside sections where we get an inside look at what these guys were thinking when they put together this framework. Like on page 270, where they discuss how the WebFormViewEngine got its name and what other options they considered. That's the type of thing that makes a book interesting in addition to being technically helpful and you just won't get that kind of behind the scenes insight in any other ASP.NET MVC book.

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  • Posted May 26, 2009

    Great Intro

    This book starts out differently from many books on software. Normally you get a couple of chapters covering the general ideas of the subject. Then chapter after chapter presenting concepts with code examples. MVC 1.0's first chapter is almost a third of the book's length (164 pages). It covers the MVC application "NerdDinner". The reader sees the application being built from the ground up, along with descriptions about how and why things are done.
    Later chapters cover MVC vs WebForms, their strengths and weakness. Chapter 12 covers putting them both together in an application, which I thought was very good. There a couple of chapters on Test Driven Development. The chapters do go into the basics of TDD, so if the reader is new to TDD they are informative chapters.
    There are whole books written on security of web sites, so the one chapter in the book covering security offers a quick overview, a few interesting stories, some examples and some concepts for the reader to think about.
    This book is an excellent introduction to MVC. At only a little over 400 pages it is a quick read. The book was written by not only by programmers, but ones that were also involved in the development of MVC at Microsoft.

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