Professional BlazeDS: Creating Rich Internet Applications with Flex and Java

Overview

BlazeDS is a popular, open source web application that can successfully be deployed into a Java application server, making it an ideal option for Flex and Java integration. With this comprehensive resource, you'll walk through the process of creating Rich Internet Applications (RIA) using BlazeDS. After a look at BlazeDS basis, the book then moves on to explain how to configure, customize, and extend BlazeDS in order to integrate with new and ezisting Java data sources and ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (20) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $2.81   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   

Overview

BlazeDS is a popular, open source web application that can successfully be deployed into a Java application server, making it an ideal option for Flex and Java integration. With this comprehensive resource, you'll walk through the process of creating Rich Internet Applications (RIA) using BlazeDS. After a look at BlazeDS basis, the book then moves on to explain how to configure, customize, and extend BlazeDS in order to integrate with new and ezisting Java data sources and applications with Flex-based RIA.

Explains how to install BlazeDS from source as well as its compiled distributions

Demonstrates ways to make user interfaces engaging and effective

Introduces techniques for intercepting for control and management

Features tips for configuring a remoting service and a destination

Reviews remoting communication flow and remoting related classes, components, and modules

Includes coverage of testing and debugging Flex and BlazeDS applications

Shows how to extend BlazeDS with custom adapters and factories to connect to enterprise Java resources.

Discusses methods for leveraging JPA and Hibernate with Flex

Delves into the topic of communication real-time via messages

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470464892
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 10/12/2009
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 1,077,624
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword xxi

Introduction xxiii

Chapter 1 Flex for Java Developers 1

Introducing Flex through Its Controls and Containers 1

Tip to Remember 3

Getting to Know the Controls 5

Laying Out the Controls 19

Leveraging Services to Access External Data 27

Using Simple HTTP and REST Style Invocations 28

Communicating via Web Services 30

Making Remote Procedure Calls 32

Making User Interfaces Engaging and Effective 33

Exploring Effects 33

Validating User Input 34

Customizing the Look and Feel 35

Extending Flex 36

Creating Custom Components 36

Creating and Propagating Custom Events 38

Summary 39

Chapter 2 Introducing BlazeDS 41

An Overview of BlazeDS 41

Viewing Integration from 30, 000 feet 43

Viewing Integration from 10, 000 feet 45

Viewing It Closely from 1, 000 Feet 45

Getting and Installing BlazeDS 47

Downloading BlazeDS 47

Installing the Compiled Distributions 49

Compiling from Source 53

Surveying the Configuration Options 54

First Look at services-config.xml 55

Remoting, Proxy and Messaging Configuration 57

Yet Another Hello to the World 58

Summary 64

Chapter 3 Using BlazeDS as a Server-Side Proxy 65

HTTP Service Proxy 66

An HTTP Proxy Service Example 69

Advanced Configuration Options of an HTTP Proxy Adapter 70

Intercepting for Control and Management 73

Web Service Proxy 76

Configuring a Web Service Proxy 79

Summary 80

Chapter 4 Remoting between Flex and POJOs 83

Essentials of Remoting 84

Remoting Communication Flow 84

Remoting-Related Classes, Components, and Modules 86

Configuring a Remoting Service and a Destination 89

Securing Destinations 91

Intercepting and Logging Calls to a Remoting Service94

Talking AMFX 96

Using HTTPS 96

Diving into Serialization ' AS3 to Java and Back 98

Running through a Complete Example 102

Java-Based Data Service 104

Client-Side Flex Code 107

Value Additions for Simple Remoting 108

Custom Security Implementation 108

An Interceptor for the JavaAdapter 110

Summary 111

Chapter 5 Accessing Spring Beans 113

Basic Bootstrapping 113

Using BlazeDS MessageBroker with the Spring DispatcherServlet 114

Serving Flex and Non-Flex Clients 117

Remoting to Spring Beans 119

Message Service Integration 124

Native BlazeDS AMF Messaging 124

JMS Messaging Using Spring-Specific JMS Components 126

Using the Special Integration Adapter 129

Leveraging Spring Security 131

Securing Remote Spring Bean Access 133

Using Custom Adapters 134

Summary 135

Chapter 6 Communicating Real-Time via Messages 137

Data Push Essentials 138

Data Push Usage Scenarios 138

The Alternatives 138

Messaging Domains 142

Point-to-Point 143

Publish-Subscribe 143

JMS 145

JMS Architecture 145

JMS Programming Model and the API 146

A BlazeDS-Powered Messaging Application 148

The Application Use Case 148

The First Few Steps 149

Sprucing Up the Client Code 153

The Simulated Feed Program 156

The Chat Window 159

The Simple Chat Application 160

The Adapters at Work 163

The Action ScriptAdapter 163

The JMSAdapter 164

Advanced Extensions to BlazeDS Data Push 164

Comet Inclusion with BlazeDS in Jetty 7 165

Summary 167

Chapter 7 Leveraging JPA and Hibernate with Flex 169

Object Relational Mismatch 170

Coarse-Grained or Fine-Grained 170

The Cases of Inheritance and Polymorphism 171

Entity Relationships 172

What Defines Identity? 174

Introducing JPA 174

Primary Key 175

Entity Relationships 176

Interacting with a Persistence Context 178

Hibernate EntityManager 3.4.0.GA Distribution 179

Set Up the Database 180

Create an Eclipse JPA project 180

Program the Entities and specify metadata 185

Bare Essentials of Hibernate 188

A Rudimentary Approach to Integration with JPA and Hibernate 191

Setting Up 191

Programming the Flex and JPA/Hibernate Application 195

Flex and Hibernate Integration Expectations 199

BlazeDS Adapter for JPA and Hibernate 201

Aspect-Oriented Programming (AOP) 203

JPA and Hibernate Adapters for BlazeDS 204

dpHibernate 204

Gilead 208

Managed Entities for Flex Applications 211

Summary 212

Chapter 8 Testing and Debugging Flex and BlazeDS Applications 215

Testing 215

FlexUnit 216

JUnit 224

Functional and Interface Testing 227

Debugging 243

Logging 243

Profiling 246

Summary 251

Chapter 9 Extending BlazeDS with Custom Adapters 253

Contextual Overview 253

The API 255

A Sample Custom Adapter 259

Custom Factories 264

Extending the Messaging Adapter 268

Advanced Strategies for Custom Adapter Creation 269

Summary 270

Chapter 10 Making BlazeDS Applications Scalable 271

Clustering 271

Channel Failover 272

Clustering Powered by JGroups 274

Data Compression 276

Data Format Optimization 278

Robust Connection 280

Service Orientation 282

Concurrent Contracts 282

Cross-Domain Utility Layer 283

Functional Decomposition 283

Rules Centralization 283

State Repository 283

Caching 283

Signed Framework RSL 285

Resource Pooling 287

JDBC Connection Pooling 287

JMS Resource Pooling 289

Bind Messaging to the Beans Using Camel 290

Using Spring's Support for Message Listener Containers 291

Workload Distribution 291

Summary 292

Chapter 11 CRUD Applications and More 293

CRUD with Flash Builder 4 294

CRUD with RESTful Endpoints 294

Generating Client Code for WebService Consumption 300

Generating CRUD with Remoting Service Destinations 303

Generating AS3 Model Objects 312

Using Gas3 312

Auto-Populating AS3 Model Objects with XML Based on an XSD 320

Summary 323

Appendix A Introducing Flex 4 325

What Is Flex 4? 325

What's New? 326

Flex 4 and Before 327

Leveraging the New Framework 331

Development Workflows 331

Flex 4 Says Hello 332

Summary 335

Index 337

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)