Professional Ethics and Social Responsibility

Professional Ethics and Social Responsibility

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by Daniel E. Wueste
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0847678164

ISBN-13: 9780847678167

Pub. Date: 08/17/1994

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Focusing on five increasingly interrelated spheres of professional activity-politics, law, engineering, medicine, and science-the contributors to Professional Ethics and Social Responsibility cast new light on familiar ethical quandaries and direct attention to new areas of concern, particularly the institutional setting of contemporary professional activity.

Overview

Focusing on five increasingly interrelated spheres of professional activity-politics, law, engineering, medicine, and science-the contributors to Professional Ethics and Social Responsibility cast new light on familiar ethical quandaries and direct attention to new areas of concern, particularly the institutional setting of contemporary professional activity.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780847678167
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
08/17/1994
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
6.08(w) x 8.94(h) x 1.02(d)

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Professional Ethics And Social Responsibility 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This collection includes some outstanding work: Joel (not Joe) Feinberg's piece is excellent. Like others in the collection it drills down on the key issues, in this case whether it is reasonable to ignore the merits of individual cases in law/public policy about euthanasia. The articles by Callahan, Hardwig and Winston are outstanding as well. The editor's introduction is very helpful and probing on some quite basic questions, for example, what features, if any, count as distinguishing features of the professions. His piece on role morality is quite good, though some will be unwilling to accept his (well argued) thesis about what's required if we are to take role morality seriously. Robert Baum's article examines a key issue in engineering ethics: how to interpret the paramountcy clause of engineering codes. The book could be (and probably is) used in college classes, but it's not a text book and should have wider appeal.