Professional JavaScript for Web Developers

Professional JavaScript for Web Developers

4.0 4
by Nicholas C. Zakas
     
 

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  • Dispels the myth that JavaScript is a "baby" language and demonstrates why it is the scripting language of choice used in the design of millions of Web pages and server-side applications
  • Quickly covers JavaScript basics and then moves on to more advanced topics such as object-oriented programming, XML, Web services, and remote scripting
  • Addresses the

Overview

  • Dispels the myth that JavaScript is a "baby" language and demonstrates why it is the scripting language of choice used in the design of millions of Web pages and server-side applications
  • Quickly covers JavaScript basics and then moves on to more advanced topics such as object-oriented programming, XML, Web services, and remote scripting
  • Addresses the many issues that Web application developers face, including internationalization, security, privacy, optimization, intellectual property issues, and obfuscation
  • Builds on the reader's basic understanding of HTML, CSS, and the Web in general

This book is also available as part of the 4-book JavaScript and Ajax Wrox Box (ISBN: 0470227818). This 4-book set includes:

  • Professional JavaScript for Web Developers (ISBN: 0764579088)
  • Professional Ajax 2nd edition (ISBN: 0470109491)
  • Professional Web 2.0 Programming (ISBN: 0470087889)
  • Professional Rich Internet Applications: Ajax and Beyond (ISBN: 0470082801)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764579080
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
04/18/2005
Series:
Wrox Professional Guides Ser.
Pages:
672
Product dimensions:
7.44(w) x 9.24(h) x 1.44(d)

Read an Excerpt

catalogimages.wiley.com/images/db/pdf/0764579088.excerpt.pdf

Meet the Author

Nicholas C. Zakas has a BS in Computer Science from Merrimack College and an MBA from Endicott College. He is the author of Professional JavaScript for Web Developers (Wiley 2005), Professional Ajax (1st and 2nd editions, Wiley 2007 and 2007) as well as several online articles. Nicholas works for Yahoo! as a frontend engineer and has worked in web development for more than 6 years, during which time he has helped develop web solutions in use at some of the largest companies in the world. Nicholas can be reached through his web site at www.nczonline.net.

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Professional JavaScript for Web Developers 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book. No question 5 stars. However, it is very dense and chapters 4-8, which repeats some information in slightly different contexts, could confuse some beginners as it did me, not a beginner. But it you take your time, read slowly and thoughtfully, and re-read these chapters a of couple times, the information will start to sink in and it will start to make some sense why some information in chapters 4-8 was presented in the way it was. One thing I particularly like about the book is that the author likes to use ECMAScript as the starting reference point for discussions. By using a single starting reference point throughout the book, and by initially comparing Browser implementations against ECMAScript, instead of immediately comparing Browser implementations against one another, the topics are presented in a far more logical/organized fashion for the brain to comprehend than they would be otherwise, and the book is well positioned not only for logically comparing Browser implementations against one another, but for comparing Browser implementations against the ideal, ECMAScript, which not only gives the book an air of authority, but makes it an excellent reference. In other words, the book does not teach the language through the differences in Browser implementations. Rather, it first teaches the language through the standards, and then it teaches Browser implementations; first, by comparison to the standards, and then by comparison to other Browsers. This, I thought, was excellent idea, and it was well done. Chapters 10-21 are good at this. My only complaints about the book are that the index is weak (I started keeping one myself), and that the book's binding broke and the pages are falling out. Steve
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Explains ECMAscript, DOM, & BOM in detail.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Multiple instances of 'toLocalString' instead of 'toLocaleString,' often within the same sentence, make the book appear slapdash.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best JavaScript book that I've come across. Zakas' expertise is clearly demonstrated through his explanations and code samples. This book is now my go to book when I need a refresher.