Professional Photoshop 6: The Classic Guide to Color Correction

Overview

An electronic prepress master reveals how to get the most out of Photoshop

Renowned among graphic design professionals for his technical grounding and ability to clearly explain difficult principles and techniques, Dan Margulis has updated his bestselling book, Professional Photoshop 5, to help readers quickly master Photoshop 6 and learn how to take full advantage of its latest tools and capabilities. Rather than focusing on program features, Dan Margulis builds on a solid ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (29) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $175.00   
  • Used (27) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$175.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(164)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$175.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(164)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

An electronic prepress master reveals how to get the most out of Photoshop

Renowned among graphic design professionals for his technical grounding and ability to clearly explain difficult principles and techniques, Dan Margulis has updated his bestselling book, Professional Photoshop 5, to help readers quickly master Photoshop 6 and learn how to take full advantage of its latest tools and capabilities. Rather than focusing on program features, Dan Margulis builds on a solid foundation of classic design concepts and skills. This new edition has been substantially expanded to include coverage of issues surrounding image handling for devices other than offset printers, such as final output on desktop color printers, high-volume copiers, and large-format printers for outdoor displays.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This edition, revised for Photoshop 6, emphasizes preparation for press and focuses on techniques of global correction. In addition to an intensive exploration of curves, the book also includes instruction for correction in LAB colorspace, unsharp masking, channel blending, the use of black plate, the luminosity blend, separation, color settings, exploiting unwanted color, handling prescreened originals, and correcting for factors beyond the photographer's control. Margulis is a contributing editor to . Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471403999
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 11/20/2000
  • Edition description: BK&CD-ROM
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 368
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.09 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Preflight: What Shall We Do with This Image?

Let there be light, the Lord said, and since then it's been nothing but headaches for those of us interested in quality color printing.

The big problem is not so much that the Lord created such a large visible spectrum, but that He also endowed us with an acutely sensitive and highly adjustable visual apparatus. The combination of these two factors makes it quite impossible to create digital images that even remotely resemble the clarity of real life.

Can a camera capture the majesty of the Grand Canyon? Anyone who has ever been there knows that it cannot. To generalize further: photographs can never rival reality. Their tonal range is too small. More important, when the human eye is confronted with a preponderance of similar colors it adjusts unconsciously, gaining sensitivity to those colors at the expense of others. A camera lacks this flexibility. A camera faithfully records what it sees, even if the human eye would see something different.

When we look closely at the Grand Canyon, with its rich redness, our eyes compensate to let us pick up a greater variety of reds. The camera sticks to its original settings. Even if it could magically make itself more sensitive to reds, though, it could not record nearly the range of colors that the eye can see.

Defining "Quality"

We can probably agree that a color photograph is "worse" than the image would appear in real life. Similarly, an amateur photographer using a $12.50 disposable camera will surely produce a "worse" image of the Grand Canyon than a professional with a first-quality instrument.

If we convert the imagerecorded by either photographer to digital information, we will get a "worse" image still. Just as between real life and a photograph, between a photograph on positive film and a digital scan there is a decrease in the range of colors that can be portrayed, and a loss of some detail.

Next in line of deteriorating quality comes the printed piece. Again, image quality and color space is lost, all to the detriment of realism.

There is yet another quality leap between color printing on reasonably good paper, such as is used in this book, and printing on poor stock, such as newsprint. A final indignity that can be imposed on an unfortunate photograph is to lose its color altogether, on those occasions when we must print it in black and white. Now that I've trashed the entire printing process, I should point out that the news is not all bad. If we can't achieve real-life or even film-like quality on the printed page, well, neither can anyone else. The viewer, consciously or not, understands this and cuts us some slack. The viewer judges the quality of a printed picture in comparison to other printed pictures, not against original transparencies, and certainly not against what the viewer might perceive in person. The really good news (or, for the lazy, the really bad news) is that, even in our relatively low-quality world, skill means a lot. Just as there is a huge gap between the work of a professional photographer and someone who just points a camera and clicks the shutter, the difference between the work of a color technician and that of a dilettante will be obvious even to the most inattentive observer.

That analogy can be carried further. In photography, a number of crutches have emerged that enable the less skilled to improve their pictures. Things like auto-focus and automatic exposure are a big help to people who don't know how to set these things manually, but the camera's judgment will never be as good as a professional's. In our own field, there are similar crutches, such as Photoshop's Auto Levels command.

The similarity with photography breaks down in one important area, however. The objects that the photographer takes pictures of, whether outdoors or in the studio, are generally just as easy or as difficult to shoot as they were five years, or 50 years, ago. That is not true for us: technology has reduced the price of capturing the base product, the digital file, that we work with, but it has also reduced its quality from the days when drum scanners reigned.

Plus, now we have much more of a range of printing conditions to plan for. Back then, it was pretty much output to film, print on an offset press. Now, we have a bewildering variety of desktop printers, digital proofers and presses, large-format printers, color copiers, and platesetters, not to mention the Web and desktop devices that don't like CMYK input at all.

Our job, therefore, is harder than it was five years ago. Of course, that means that we will have to be better.

The Goals in Color Manipulation

Before charging into color correction with both guns blazing, wed best have some idea of what we're aiming at. This is a ticklish topic, one that many people ignore.

Leaving aside the cases where we want the printed piece to be at odds with the original (as when the sky is overcast in the photograph but we want happier-looking weather), the standard instruction in the industry is "match the art." By this, we are supposed to understand that we are to produce something that reminds the viewer as much as possible of the original photograph, granted that we are smashing it into a grotesquely smaller range of colors.

Plainly, we can't be too literal about this. If the original photograph has a scratch or dust on it, nobody would question that "match the art" means take it out.

Next, there is general agreement that if the photograph is flat, it's our job to fix it. By "flat" we mean lacking contrast, which means lacking a good range, which means that either the whites are too dark or the blacks too light, or both. In printing, our color range is so limited to begin with that we can't afford such flat images, even when the original photograph itself is slightly flat. So, to most professionals, "match the art" means set the lightest white in the original to the value of the lightest white that we can print and still show detail, and set the darkest black in the original to the darkest combination of inks that we can conveniently accommodate. The results of this approach cause no end of astonishment to the uninitiated. Nobody thinks that a snapshot will reproduce as well as a high-quality transparency, but that is because the transparency has so much more of a dynamic range. Once we scan and correct the two, they'll each have the same range, and as long as the snapshot was as detailed as the transparency, it will print just about as well.

Should We Match the Art?

Another major issue, particularly in dealing with photos taken outdoors, where lighting conditions are unpredictable, is that when we compress the colors of the original into our colorspace, we sometimes exaggerate an existing color cast. Color casts are-well, Figure 1.1, that's a color cast, albeit a mild one. If you compare it to Figure 1.2, it looks like there's a yellow piece of Saran Wrap lying over it. Every color is affected.

Casts are usually caused by suboptimal lighting conditions, but they can also be introduced or aggravated by lousy scanning. Casts come in every conceivable color strength, and some affect only certain lightness ranges. Even a relatively mild one can damage an image, because casts play havoc with neutral colors. By neutral colors, we mean whites and grays. Neutral colors, as will be repeated over and over in these pages, are one of our chief torments. They must be carefully balanced, or they won't stay neutral. The lighter the gray, the easier it is to mess up...

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction
1 Preflight: What Shall We Do with This Image?
2 Color Correction By the Numbers
3 The Steeper the Curve, The More the Contrast
4 Sharpening with a Stiletto
5 Plate Blending as Poetry
6 In Color Correction, The Key Is the K
7 RGB Is CMY
8 HSB Is LAB
9 All Colorspaces Are One
10 Making Thinkings Look Alike
11 Managing Separation And Color Settings
12 The Great Dot Gain Gamble
13 Friend and Foe in Black and White
14 Resolving the Resolution Issue
15 Math, Moire, and the Artist: A New Angle on Descreening
16 Every File Has Ten Channels
17 There Are No Bad Originals
Notes & Credits
Index
A Note on the Type
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)