Professional Pursuits: Women and the American Arts and Crafts Movement

Overview


The Victorian era provided few opportunities for women in the professional world.  The American Arts and Crafts movement, which began in the late nineteenth century to promote handcraftsmanship over mass production, was a major factor in changing the status of women as professional workers.  In Professional Pursuits, Catherine Zipf examines the participation of women in this significant design movement and the role they played in revolutionizing the position of women in the professional world.  ...
See more details below
Paperback (1)
$22.48
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$24.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (3) from $14.43   
  • New (1) from $24.90   
  • Used (2) from $14.43   
Sending request ...

Overview


The Victorian era provided few opportunities for women in the professional world.  The American Arts and Crafts movement, which began in the late nineteenth century to promote handcraftsmanship over mass production, was a major factor in changing the status of women as professional workers.  In Professional Pursuits, Catherine Zipf examines the participation of women in this significant design movement and the role they played in revolutionizing the position of women in the professional world.  She also shows how, in turn, the Arts and Crafts movement set the stage for social and political change in future years.

Zipf focuses on five gifted women in various parts of the country. In San Diego, Hazel Wood Waterman parlayed her Arts and Crafts training into a career in architecture. Cincinnati's Mary Louise McLaughlin expanded on her interest in Arts and Crafts pottery by inventing new ceramic technology.

New York's Candace Wheeler established four businesses that used Arts and Crafts production to help other women earn a living.  In Syracuse, both Adelaide Alsop Robineau and Irene Sargent were responsible for disseminating Arts and Crafts-related information through the movement's publications. Each woman's story is different, but each played an important part in the creation of professional opportunities for women in a male-dominated society.

Professional Pursuits will be of interest to scholars and students of material culture and of the Arts and Crafts movement. More importantly, it chronicles a very significant, little-understood aspect of the development of Victorian capitalism: the integration of women into the professional workforce.

Catherine Zipf is an assistant professor in the Department of Cultural and Historic Preservation at Salve Regina University.  She has published articles in Women's Art News and the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781572336858
  • Publisher: University of Tennessee Press
  • Publication date: 5/22/2009
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 229
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author


Catherine Zipf is an assistant professor in the Department of Cultural and Historic Preservation at Salve Regina University.  She has published articles in Women's Art News and the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Opportunities for Women 1

1 Woman as Architect 19

Case Study: The Career of Hazel Wood Waterman 30

2 Woman as Inventor 51

Case Study: Mary Louise McLaughlin and Ceramic Technology 60

3 Woman as Executive 81

Case Study: Businesswoman Candace Thurber Wheeler 87

4 Woman as Editor 109

Case Study: Adelaide Alsop Robineau and the Publication of Keramic Studio 117

5 Women and the American Arts and Crafts Movement 139

Case Study: The Craftsman, by Irene Sargent 143

Conclusion 160

Notes 165

Bibliography 197

Index 215

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)