Professional Windows 8 Programming: Application Development with C# and XAML

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Overview

It is an exciting time to be a Windows developer. The arrival of Windows 8 is a complete game changer. The operating system and its development platform offer you an entirely new way to create rich, full-featured Windows-based applications. This team of authors takes you on a journey through all of the new development features of the Windows 8 platform specifically how to utilize Visual Studio 2012 and the XAML/C# languages to produce robust ...

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Overview

It is an exciting time to be a Windows developer. The arrival of Windows 8 is a complete game changer. The operating system and its development platform offer you an entirely new way to create rich, full-featured Windows-based applications. This team of authors takes you on a journey through all of the new development features of the Windows 8 platform specifically how to utilize Visual Studio 2012 and the XAML/C# languages to produce robust apps that are ready for deployment in the new Windows Store.

Professional Windows 8 Programming:

  • Learn how to utilize XAML to create rich content driven user interfaces
  • Make use of the new AppBar to create a chrome-less menu system
  • See how to support Sensors and Geo-location on Windows 8 devices
  • Integrate your app into the Windows 8 ecosystem with Contracts and Extensions
  • Walks you through the new Windows 8 navigation system for multi-page apps
  • Minimize code with Data Binding and MVVM design patterns
  • Features tips on getting your app ready for the Windows store
  • Maximize revenue for your app by learning about available monetization strategies
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118205709
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 12/26/2012
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 504
  • Sales rank: 1,439,930
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Nick Lecrenski is the founder/lead developer of MyFitnessJournal.com, a fitness tracking website that utilizes JQuery, HTML 5, and CSS.

Doug Holland is an architect with Microsoft's Developer and Platform Evangelism team and works with Microsoft's strategic ISV partners to help bring new and exciting experiences to consumers on Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8.

Allen Sanders is an architect at Teksouth Corporation and co-owner of LiquidKey, LLC. He provides expertise from the user experience to the database for line of business, Windows 8, and Windows Phone solutions.

Kevin Ashley is an architect at Microsoft and the author of top apps for Windows 8 and Windows Phone.

Wrox Professional guides are planned and written by working programmers to meet the real-world needs of programmers, developers, and IT professionals. Focused and relevant, they address the issues technology professionals face every day. They provide examples, practical solutions, and expert education in new technologies, all designed to help programmers do a better job.

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Table of Contents

Introduction xxv

Chapter 1 A Glimpse into the Future 1

The Game Changer 1

What Makes Windows 8 Different? 2

Understanding Windows 8: The Zune Concept 3

Windows Phone 7 Carry-overs 4

Getting Around in Windows 8 4

The Login Screen 5

The Start Screen 5

The Search Feature 6

Application Life Cycle 7

Accessing Desktop Mode 7

Windows Store App Development 10

Hello Windows 8 13

Selecting a Language and Default Folders 13

Building a Simple Windows Store App 14

Setting App Capabilities 16

What About HTML Developers? 21

Types of Windows Store Apps 23

Grid Applications 24

Split Applications 44

Creating a Split Application 44

Summary 48

Chapter 2 What Is XAML? 49

A Quick XAML History Lesson 50

XAML Basics 51

XAML in Visual Studio 2012 53

Controls for Windows 8 54

Layout Controls 55

Action Controls 66

Summary 78

Chapter 3 Enhancing Your Apps with Control Styles, Data Binding, and Semantic Zoom 79

Customizing Your Apps 79

Styling Controls 80

Understanding Basic Styling 80

Referencing Styles Across an App 86

Using Microsoft's Default Styles 88

Data Binding 91

Understanding Basic Data Entry 91

Binding Objects to the User Interface 92

Updating Data with Two-Way Data Binding 96

Data Binding Summary 98

Windows 8 Data Binding Controls 98

ComboBox 98

ListBox 101

ListView 102

GridView 106

Grouped GridView 108

Using SemanticZoom 113

Using Custom Controls 116

Summary 119

Chapter 4 Windows 8 User Interface Final Touches 121

Application Bars, Notifications, Splash Screens, and Live Tiles 121

Working with the App Bar 122

Creating the Top App Bar Navigation 123

Wiring Up the App Pages 129

Adding Filtering Capability 133

Adding Finishing Touches to the App 135

Adding Notifications 136

Understanding Templates 136

A Toast Example 139

Creating Live Tiles 143

Available Tile Templates 144

Live Tiles Example 145

Splash Screen 149

Summary 150

Chapter 5 Application Life Cycle 151

Applications Reborn 151

What Is the Windows 8 Life Cycle? 151

App Launch 152

App Activation 162

App Resume 165

App Close 167

Background Operations 168

Triggers and Conditions 169

Lock Screen 174

Progress Reporting 174

Debugging 178

Deadlock 179

Summary 179

Chapter 6 Handling Data, Files, and Networking 181

Getting Started with Data, Files, and Networking 182

Handling Application Data and Files 182

Getting Started with the Data Samples App 182

Understanding Windows Storage API 184

Working with Data and Files Locations 185

File Access Permissions 186

Local Settings and Application Data 188

Roaming Settings and Application Data 190

Temporary Application Data 192

Versioning Application Data 192

Clearing Application Data 193

Displaying Pictures Library Content 193

Selecting Files: User Experience 197

Tracking Files and Folders 199

Serializing and Deserializing Data 201

Data Encryption and Decryption 203

Networking 204

Establishing Socket Connectivity 204

Data Transfers 211

Activating Proximity and Tapping 215

Syndicated Content 221

Accessing Network Information 222

Example: Leaderboard App 223

Summary 228

Chapter 7 Sensors 229

Windows Sensor Platform 229

Hardware for the Sensor Platform 230

Windows Sensor Platform Overview 230

Using the 3-D Accelerometer 232

Using the 3-D Compass 234

Using the Compass Class 234

Calculating True North Headings 236

Using the 3-D Gyrometer 237

Using the Inclinometer 239

Using the Ambient Light Sensor 241

Using the Orientation Sensors 243

Using the OrientationSensor Class 243

Using the SimpleOrientationSensor Class 245

Summary 247

Chapter 8 Geolocation 249

What Is Geolocation? 249

Geolocation in Windows 8 251

Using the Geolocator Class 251

Understanding the CivicAddress Class 253

Using the Bing Maps SDK 256

Referencing the Bing Maps SDK 256

Using the Bing.Maps.Map Class 257

Using Pushpins on the Map 258

Adding Traffic Information 260

Getting Directions 262

Enabling Directions with Pushpins 263

Summary 267

Chapter 9 Application Contracts and Extensions 269

App Contracts and Extensions 269

Using the File Picker Contract 270

Selecting a Single File 270

Selecting Multiple Files 271

Selecting Files from Windows Store Apps 272

Debugging File Picker Activation 275

Using the Cached File Updater Contract 276

Using the Play To Contract 276

Introducing the PlayToManager Class 276

Testing PlayTo Scenarios 278

Using the Search Contract 279

Using the Settings Contract 284

Using the Share Contract 285

Introducing the DataTransferManager Class 286

DataTransferManager.DataRequested 286

DataTransferManager.TargetApplicationChosen 286

Share Contract Scenarios 287

Using the Account Picture Provider Extension 287

Using the AutoPlay Extension 289

Using the Background Tasks Extension 291

Using Push Notifications 291

Using Background Tasks 292

Using the Camera Settings Extension 293

Using the Contact Picker Extension 294

Using the File Activation Extension 295

Implementing the File Activation Extension 295

Debugging File Activation 296

Using the Game Explorer Extension 297

Using the Print Task Settings Extension 298

Using the Protocol Activation Extension 298

Activating the Maps App 298

Making the Required Declarations 299

Debugging Protocol Activation 300

Using SSL/Certificates Extension 301

Summary 302

Chapter 10 Windows Store Application Architecture 303

Best Practices for Your Apps 303

Understanding MVVM 304

Locating ViewModels 306

Refactoring the Artist Browser 307

Instantiating a ViewModelLocator 308

Removing DefaultViewModel 314

Simplifying the Models 324

Using Commands to Handle Input 326

Using MVVM Frameworks 332

Understanding MVVM Light 332

Messaging in MVVM Light 335

Summary 337

Chapter 11 Windows Store and Monetization 339

Windows Store Overview 339

How Consumers See Your App 340

App Discovery 341

Making the First Good Impression 342

Promoting Your App 343

Selling Your Apps 343

Windows Store Economics 344

Windows Store API Overview 344

Getting Started with the Color Shopping App 345

Supporting Trials 349

In-App Purchases 360

Adding Advertisements 368

Summary: The Economics of Monetizing Your App 372

Application Packaging 374

Preparing your app in Visual Studio 375

Packaging Apps Using a Command Line 379

Packaging Enterprise Line-of-Business (LOB) Apps 380

Testing with Windows App Certification Kit 381

Understanding Windows Store Certification Requirements 381

Summary 382

Chapter 12 Putting It All Together: Building A Windows Store Application 383

Welcome to the Final Chapter of the Book 383

Designing the Wrox Bookstore App 384

Displaying Wrox Press Books 384

Adding a Wish List Across Devices 386

Diving into the Code 387

Getting Ready for MVVM 388

Creating Sample Data 391

Creating the Home Page 399

Configuring the XAML 400

Updating the ViewModel 406

Finishing the Code Behind 409

Drilling Down into Groups 411

Configuring the XAML 411

Updating the View Model 416

Finishing the Code Behind 418

Showing Detailed Book Information 422

Configuring the XAML 422

Updating the View Model 427

Finishing the Code Behind 428

Providing a Wish List Feature with SkyDrive 430

Making Files Available Locally 430

Registering Your App 434

Loading/Creating the Wish List File 434

Saving the Wish List File 439

Adding the Commands 440

Updating the Tile and Splash Screen 441

Getting Ready for the Store 442

Opening a Developer Account 443

Reserving an App Name 443

Acquiring a Developer License 444

Editing the App Manifest 444

Associating the App with the Store 445

Capturing Screenshots 445

Creating App Packages 446

Uploading App Packages 446

Concluding Remarks on the Store Checklist 447

Summary 447

Index 449

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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2013

    The book is wroth less then nothing. Besides a lot of useless st

    The book is wroth less then nothing. Besides a lot of useless stuff (like 2 pages of XAML code just to write about one line) there is one chapter that I hoped to be useful: contracts and extensions. Actually I appeared to be the worst one. Nothing is explained. In some cases the authors are really rude. They just write: go and find a solution somewhere. All in all I recoment to keep away from this garbage book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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