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Prognosis in Neurology
     

Prognosis in Neurology

by James M. Gilchrist
 

Each chapter in this edited volume defines the disease/injury in question, details its natural history, establishes the factors involved in determining prognosis, and discusses the evaluation necessary to determine the prognosis. The effect on the disease course of any therapeutic endeavors is discussed as it relates to prognosis.

Overview

Each chapter in this edited volume defines the disease/injury in question, details its natural history, establishes the factors involved in determining prognosis, and discusses the evaluation necessary to determine the prognosis. The effect on the disease course of any therapeutic endeavors is discussed as it relates to prognosis.

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Sean D. Ruland, DO (University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine)
Description: This text deals with the prognosis of neurologic illness.
Purpose: The purpose is to rejuvenate what the editor feels to be the lost physician art of prognostication. It is, in his opinion, a role of physicians that has been pushed to the side in favor of advances in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Indeed, this is a worthy objective that he makes a valid attempt at meeting.
Audience: The target audience, as stated in the preface, is neurologists and general internists. It is my opinion that this is written at a level that could benefit only those physicians (at any level) skilled at making an accurate assessment and interpretation of the clinical prognostic indicators for the various disease entities.
Features: Many reputable and credible individuals have contributed chapters. The book covers a wide range of neurologic diseases, not from a diagnostic or therapeutic standpoint, but from the aspect of how the variable features of each disease help to predict what to expect in terms of outcomes. This encompasses both natural history of the disease untreated, as well as responses to therapeutic intervention. A short description of the disease is supplied, the natural history, factors affecting prognosis, how to evaluate for prognosis, therapies and their effects on prognosis, and short and long-term prognosis. There are few photographs or tables, which is to be expected in a book of this design.
Assessment: I find this book to be a refreshing change from standard textbooks. It is the first that I have run across that focuses solely on prognostication and therefore has no gold standard for comparison. I have enjoyed reading it, have found very useful information in it, and have referred to it already on several instances regarding personal cases.
3 Stars from Doody
Sean D. Ruland
This text deals with the prognosis of neurologic illness. The purpose is to rejuvenate what the editor feels to be the lost physician art of prognostication. It is, in his opinion, a role of physicians that has been pushed to the side in favor of advances in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Indeed, this is a worthy objective that he makes a valid attempt at meeting. The target audience, as stated in the preface, is neurologists and general internists. It is my opinion that this is written at a level that could benefit only those physicians (at any level) skilled at making an accurate assessment and interpretation of the clinical prognostic indicators for the various disease entities. Many reputable and credible individuals have contributed chapters. The book covers a wide range of neurologic diseases, not from a diagnostic or therapeutic standpoint, but from the aspect of how the variable features of each disease help to predict what to expect in terms of outcomes. This encompasses both natural history of the disease untreated, as well as responses to therapeutic intervention. A short description of the disease is supplied, the natural history, factors affecting prognosis, how to evaluate for prognosis, therapies and their effects on prognosis, and short and long-term prognosis. There are few photographs or tables, which is to be expected in a book of this design. I find this book to be a refreshing change from standard textbooks. It is the first that I have run across that focuses solely on prognostication and therefore has no gold standard for comparison. I have enjoyed reading it, have found very useful information in it, and have referred to it already on several instancesregarding personal cases.
Journal of the American Medical Association
This is a useful, interesting, and thoughtful book, which can be recommended to neurologists and internists, especially those who function as clinicians and consultants.
Booknews
The relative inability of the nervous system to regenerate and recover, its sequestration, and its complexity make the nervous system less amenable to therapeutic strategies than other organ systems. For this reason, the 81 chapters devoted to specific diseases focus specifically on improving the ability of the physician to predict the course of neurologic disorders. The material is organized into 14 sections discussing consciousness, epileptic, degenerative, movement, demyelinating, spinal cord, peripheral nerve, muscle, metabolic, toxic, congenital, developmental, and other miscellaneous disorders; vascular and neoplastic disease; and infections. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780750698887
Publisher:
Elsevier Health Sciences
Publication date:
05/18/1998
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x (d)

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