Programming and Problem Solving with Java with CDROM

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Sudbury 2004 Other Student/Developer ed. New.

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More About This Book

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763730697
  • Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC
  • Publication date: 8/13/2004
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 789
  • Product dimensions: 7.74 (w) x 9.46 (h) x 1.17 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Chapter 1 Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming 2
1.1 Overview of Object-Oriented Programming 4
1.2 How Is Java Code Converted into a Form That a Computer Can Use? 10
1.3 How Does Interpreting Code Differ from Executing It? 14
1.4 How Is Compilation Related to Interpretation and Execution? 14
1.5 What Kinds of Instructions Can Be Written in a Programming Language? 15
1.6 What's Inside the Computer? 20
1.7 Problem-Solving Techniques 22
Summary 33
Quick Check 34
Exam Preparation Exercises 36
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 37
Programming Problems 38
Case Study Follow-Up 38
Chapter 2 Java Syntax and Semantics, Classes, and Objects 40
2.1 The Elements of Java Programs 42
2.2 Application Construction 70
2.3 Application Entry, Correction, and Execution 75
2.4 Classes and Methods 78
2.5 Testing and Debugging 86
Summary 87
Quick Check 88
Exam Preparation Exercises 90
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 94
Programming Problems 95
Case Study Follow-Up 97
Chapter 3 Arithmetic Expressions 98
3.1 Overview of Java Data Types 100
3.2 Numeric Data Types 103
3.3 Declarations for Numeric Types 106
3.4 Simple Arithmetic Expressions 108
3.5 Compound Arithmetic Expressions 114
3.6 Additional Mathematical Methods 120
3.7 Value-Returning Class Methods 122
3.8 Additional String Operations 126
3.9 Applications with Multiple Class Files 131
3.10 Testing and Debugging 140
Summary 141
Quick Check 141
Exam Preparation Exercises 143
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 146
Programming Problems 150
Case Study Follow-Up 151
Chapter 4 Selection and Encapsulation 152
4.1 Flow of Control 154
4.2 Conditions and Logical Expressions 154
4.3 The if Statement 167
4.4 Nested if Statements 173
4.5 Encapsulation 177
4.6 Abstraction 179
4.7 Testing and Debugging 190
Summary 197
Quick Check 197
Exam Preparation Exercises 199
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 204
Programming Problems 206
Case Study Follow-Up 209
Chapter 5 File Objects and Looping Statements 210
5.1 File Input and Output 212
5.2 Looping 220
5.3 Mutable and Immutable Objects 242
5.4 Testing and Debugging 252
Summary 255
Quick Check 257
Exam Preparation Exercises 258
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 262
Programming Problems 264
Case Study Follow-Up 266
Chapter 6 Object-Oriented Software Design and Implementation 268
6.1 Software Design Strategies 270
6.2 Objects and Classes Revisited 271
6.3 Object-Oriented Design 274
6.4 The CRC Card Design Process 277
6.5 Functional Decomposition 285
6.6 Object-Oriented Implementation 289
6.7 Packages 294
6.8 Ethics and Responsibilities in the Computing Profession 301
6.9 Testing and Debugging 314
Summary 315
Quick Check 316
Exam Preparation Exercises 317
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 319
Programming Problems 320
Case Study Follow-Up 323
Chapter 7 Inheritance, Polymorphism, and Scope 324
7.1 Inheritance 326
7.2 Inheritance and the Object-Oriented Design Process 328
7.3 How to Read a Class Hierarchy 333
7.4 Derived Class Syntax 337
7.5 Scope of Access 339
7.6 Implementing a Derived Class 346
7.7 Copy Constructors 352
7.8 Output and Input of Objects 354
7.9 Testing and Debugging 365
Summary 366
Quick Check 367
Exam Preparation Exercises 368
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 370
Programming Problem 372
Case Study Follow-Up 373
Chapter 8 Event-Driven Input and Output 374
8.1 Frames 376
8.2 Formatting Output 382
8.3 Event Handling 385
8.4 Entering Data Using Fields in a Frame 394
8.5 Creating a Data Entry Field 396
8.6 Using a Field 397
8.7 Reading Data in an Event Handler 398
8.8 Handling Multiple Button Events 409
8.9 Testing and Debugging 420
Summary 421
Quick Check 421
Exam Preparation Exercises 422
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 424
Programming Problems 426
Case Study Follow-Up 426
Chapter 9 Exceptions and Additional Control Structures 430
9.1 Exception-Handling Mechanism 432
9.2 Additional Control Statements 438
9.3 Additional Java Operators 448
9.4 Testing and Debugging 466
Summary 467
Quick Check 468
Exam Preparation Exercises 470
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 472
Programming Problems 474
Case Study Follow-Up 477
Chapter 10 One-Dimensional Arrays 478
10.1 Atomic Data Types 480
10.2 Composite Data Types 481
10.3 One-Dimensional Arrays 483
10.4 Examples of Declaring and Processing Arrays 493
10.5 Arrays of Objects 497
10.6 Arrays and Methods 500
10.7 Special Kinds of Array Processing 501
10.8 Testing and Debugging 510
Summary 513
Quick Check 513
Exam Preparation Exercises 514
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 517
Programming Problems 518
Case Study Follow-Up 521
Chapter 11 Array-Based Lists 522
11.1 Lists 524
11.2 List Class 525
11.3 Sorting the List Items 539
11.4 Sorted List 543
11.5 The List Class Hierarchy and Abstract Classes 548
11.6 Searching 550
11.7 Generic Lists 559
11.8 Testing and Debugging 571
Summary 572
Quick Check 573
Exam Preparation Exercises 574
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 575
Programming Problems 577
Case Study Follow-Up 578
Chapter 12 Multidimensional Arrays and Numeric Computation 580
12.1 Two-Dimensional Arrays 582
12.2 Processing Two-Dimensional Arrays 586
12.3 Multidimensional Arrays 591
12.4 Vector Class 592
12.5 Floating-Point Numbers 592
12.6 Decimal Format Type 602
12.7 Testing and Debugging 619
Summary 621
Quick Check 621
Exam Preparation Exercises 623
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 628
Programming Problems 630
Case Study Follow-Up 633
Chapter 13 Recursion 634
13.1 What Is Recursion? 636
13.2 More Examples with Simple Variables 638
13.3 Recursive Algorithms with Structured Variables 648
13.4 Recursion or Iteration? 651
13.5 Testing and Debugging 652
Summary 653
Quick Check 653
Exam Preparation Exercises 654
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 655
Chapter 14 Applets 658
14.1 What Is an Applet? 660
14.2 How Do You Write an Applet? 661
14.3 How Do You Run an Applet? 667
14.4 Testing and Debugging 676
Summary 677
Quick Check 677
Exam Preparation Exercises 677
Programming Warm-Up Exercises 678
Programming Problems 679
Case Study Follow-Up 680
Appendixes 682
Glossary 698
Answers 706
Index 744
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