Programming Microsoft SQL Server 2012

Programming Microsoft SQL Server 2012

3.5 2
by Leonard Lobel, Andrew Brust
     
 

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Your essential guide to key programming features in Microsoft SQL Server 2012

Take your database programming skills to a new level—and build customized applications using the developer tools introduced with SQL Server 2012. This hands-on reference shows you how to design, test, and deploy SQL Server databases through tutorials, practical examples,

Overview

Your essential guide to key programming features in Microsoft SQL Server 2012

Take your database programming skills to a new level—and build customized applications using the developer tools introduced with SQL Server 2012. This hands-on reference shows you how to design, test, and deploy SQL Server databases through tutorials, practical examples, and code samples. If you’re an experienced SQL Server developer, this book is a must-read for learning how to design and build effective SQL Server 2012 applications.

Discover how to:

  • Build and deploy databases using the SQL Server Data Tools IDE
  • Query and manipulate complex data with powerful Transact-SQL enhancements
  • Integrate non-relational features, including native file streaming and geospatial data types
  • Consume data with Microsoft ADO.NET, LINQ, and Entity Framework
  • Deliver data using Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) Data Services and WCF RIA Services
  • Move your database to the cloud with Windows Azure SQL Database
  • Develop Windows Phone cloud applications using SQL Data Sync
  • Use SQL Server BI components, including xVelocity in-memory technologies

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780735658226
Publisher:
Microsoft Press
Publication date:
08/01/2012
Series:
Developer Reference Series
Pages:
816
Product dimensions:
7.20(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.50(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Leonard Lobel is a principal consultant at Tallan, a Microsoft Gold Certified Partner.

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Programming Microsoft SQL Server 2012 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
RickMartinez More than 1 year ago
Take your database programming skills to a new level and build customized applications using the developer tools introduced with SQL Server 2012. This hands-on reference shows you how to design, test, and deploy SQL Server databases through tutorials, practical examples, and code samples. If you’re an experienced SQL Server developer, this book is a must-read for learning how to design and build effective SQL Server 2012 applications. This book is intended for developers who have a basic knowledge of relational database terms and principles. This is a book about Microsoft SQL Server 2012 written for the developer. Whether you are programming against SQL Server directly at the database level or further up the stack using Microsoft >NET, this books shows you the way. The latest release of Microsoft’s flagship database product delivers an unprecedented, highly scalable data platform capable of handling the most demanding tasks and workloads. As with every release, SQL Server 2012 adds many new features and enhancements for developers, administrators, and end users.
zave More than 1 year ago
If you’re looking for a book that gives you plenty of starting points for programming against the various data access APIs available to MS SQL Server using .NET while learning something about some of the new tools and features available to MS SQL Server 2012, including SQL Server Data Tools, then this book is a good place to start. My only complaint: when this review went to press, the companion website and accompanying code samples were non-existent, yet they’re referenced on several occasions; a little frustrating. Part One of the book, “Core SQL Server Development”, kicks off with a description of the new SQL Server Data Tools and its declarative, model based development approach, which utilizes an “in-memory representation of what the database looks like”. This permits a developer to work against something beside the database, all from inside the project explorer in Visual Studio, then deploy to the real thing. Chapter two of the book illustrates the latest T-SQL additions, which include improved “windowing” using the OVER clause, new functions, improvements to THROW, ”server-side result set paging with OFFSET and FETCH NEXT”, “sequential number generation with the SEQUENCE object”, and “metadata discovery”. Even in the absence of the downloadable code samples, there are plenty of samples in the pages of the book to keep you off the streets. Chapter Three does a good job showing the reader the degree to which Visual Studio and SQL Server are integrated and how a developer can host SQL Server Database Projects in Visual Studio, and the next chapter goes on to give a thorough explanation of Transactions and a review of the ACID properties for added context. Chapter Five lists the “four themes” of the security framework of SQL Server: Secure by Design, Default, Deployment, and Communications. Later, some of the attack methods that hackers use to molest SQL Server are shared with the reader, also for additional context. Part Two, which spans Chapters 6 through 9, describes situations where storing XML in the database might be the best option, despite the objections of “database purists”. The FOR XML commands are introduced here, along with several other XML features used for programming against SQL Server, like XQuery, OPENXML, and FOR XML PATH. In Chapter Seven, the authors demonstrate the usefulness and best practices for the hierarchyid data type. Chapter Eight gives us a very informative lesson on the reasons for Native File Streaming and how it provides us with the opportunity to enjoy the benefits of file system and database storage at the same time. In addition, it introduces us to the FileTable, which is a new feature in SQL Server 2012 that “builds on FILESTREAM”, and “combines hierarchyid and the Windows file system API to deliver exciting new BLOB capabilities in SQL Server.” Chapter 9 explores spatial data support in SQL Server with a couple of examples that work with the geometry and geography data types and their associated methods, then goes on to introduce new spatial classes like circular strings, compound curves and curve polygons. The chapter ends with a Bing Mash-Up application. Part Three of the book encompasses six more chapters and starts off with a rundown of the .NET data access APIs—ADO.NET, LINQ, and the Entity Framework, with close attention paid to DataSets, including a discussion defending their continued relevance. Chapter Eleven moves on to WCF and is packed with sample code for building and extending data services and RIA services using REST and OData. This is the chapter where Silverlight makes its appearance. Chapters 12 and 13 move to the cloud. I liked these chapters for their complete description of the subject. The authors cover what the cloud actually is, which is a discussion that actually begins in Chapter One, all the way to SQL Azure pricing plans and screen shots of the management portal. Also included in these chapters is a discussion of the importance of BACPACS and DACPACS, which are the deployment units generated by SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT). SQL Azure Federations, SQL Azure “Data Sync” and Windows Phone 7 development are also examined, complete with a description of the “characteristics of an occasionally connected system” and how to create one. The book finishes with two chapters (14 and 15) of discourse on the subject of SQL Server’s business intelligence stack, which is what drew me to the book in the first place. Included in this final section are brief summaries of each tool, and finally, a description of the new “enhancements to PowerPivot” and “the introduction of column store technologies to SQL Server”.