Programming Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0

Overview

Create professional-quality applications, components, and user interfaces faster and more efficiently than ever with the powerful object-oriented programming capabilities in the Visual Basic 6.0 development system. From Windows common controls to data access, Internet, and ActiveX programming, this book covers core development topics for version 6.0—providing insightful explanations and expertly rendered examples for rapid acceleration of your Win32 productivity.

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Overview

Create professional-quality applications, components, and user interfaces faster and more efficiently than ever with the powerful object-oriented programming capabilities in the Visual Basic 6.0 development system. From Windows common controls to data access, Internet, and ActiveX programming, this book covers core development topics for version 6.0—providing insightful explanations and expertly rendered examples for rapid acceleration of your Win32 productivity.

  • Expedite development with the object-oriented capabilities in Visual Basic 6.0—including events, polymorphism, and object hierarchies
  • Develop great user interfaces that use the full range of controls in Visual Basic and take advantage of OLE drag and drop, data-driven forms, and advanced Windows API techniques
  • Build datacentric solutions using ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) 2.0 and 2.1, the DataEnvironment designer, and RDS components for remote activation over the Internet
  • Master ActiveX technology to create controls, learning advanced techniques such as COM callbacks, multithreaded components and applications, and windowless ActiveX controls
  • Deploy rich, Web-ready components and applications with Dynamic HTML (DHTML) and Microsoft Internet Information Server

An electronic version of this book is available on the companion CD.

For customers who purchase an ebook version of this title, instructions for downloading the CD files can be found in the ebook.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735605589
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press
  • Publication date: 5/12/1999
  • Series: Programming Series
  • Edition description: REV
  • Pages: 1312
  • Product dimensions: 7.34 (w) x 9.12 (h) x 2.19 (d)

Meet the Author

Francesco Balena is a well-known and highly regarded developer and author. He has written numerous Microsoft Press books, including the widely acclaimed Programming Microsoft Visual Basic titles, and edits a popular Web site on .NET programming. Francesco is a cofounder of Code Architects srl, an Italian software company that specializes in using Microsoft technologies to create enterprise-level solutions and programming tools. In addition, he is a regional director for MSDN Italy, and a frequent speaker at developer conferences.

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Read an Excerpt


Chapter 14: ADO at Work

...PROCESSING DATA

After you've successfully opened a connection, your next step will probably be to read some records from the data source. You can accomplish this in several ways, but all of them involve the creation of a Recordset object.

Opening a Recordset Object

Before you open a Recordset, you must decide which records you want to retrieve, which type of cursor you want to create (if any), the cursor's location, and so on.

The source string
The most important property of a Recordset object is its Source property, which indicates which records should be retrieved. This property can be the name of a database table or view, the name of a stored procedure, or the text of a SELECT command. When you're working with file-based Recordsets, the Source property can also be the name and path of a file. (File-based Recordsets are described later in this chapter.) Here are a few examples:

 ' Select a different source, based on an array of option buttons. Dim rs As New ADODB.Recordset If optSource(0).Value Then      Database table ElseIf optSource(1).Value Then  Stored procedure ElseIf optSource(2) Then        SOL query 'A*'" End If

When you open a Recordset, you must specify the connection that you want used. You can do this in at least four ways:

  • You create a stand-alone Connection object with all the properties you want (connection timeout, user name and password, and so on), you open it, and then you assign it to the Recordset's ActiveConnection property before opening the Recordset.
  • You create a stand-alone Connection object as described in the previous point and pass it as the second argument of the Recordset's Open method. The effects of this sequence are identical, but it lets you save one statement.
  • You pass a connection string as the second argument of the Recordset's
  • You create a stand-alone Connection object as shown in the first two I'll describe a few other ways to open a Recordset, based on the Command object, in the "Using Command Objects" section, later in this chapter. Here are some code examples, all of which open the Authors table of the Pubs database on the SQL Server named P2:
     ' Method 1: explicit Connection assigned to the ActiveConnection property. Dim cn As New ADODB.Connection, rs As New ADODB.Recordset cn.ConnectionTimeout = 5 cn.Open "Provider=sqloledb;Data Source=P2,Initial Catalog=pubs;", "sa" Set rs.ActiveConnection = cn rs.Open "Authors" ' Method 2: explicit Connection passed to the Open method. Dim cn As New ADODB.Connection, rs As New ADODB.Recordset cn.ConnectionTimeout = 5 cn.Open "Provider=sqloledb;Data Source=P2;Initial Catalog=pubs:", "sa" rs.Open "Authors", cn ' Method 3: implicit Connection created in the Recordset's Open method. ' Note that you need to embed additional connection attributes (such as ' connection timeout and user ID) in the connection string. Dim rs As New ADODB.Recordset rs.Open "Authors", "Provider=sqloledb;Data Source=P2:" _ ' Method 4: the Execute method of the Connection object. By default, it ' opens a server-side forward-only, read-only Recordset with CacheSize=1. Dim cn As New ADODB.Connection, rs As New ADODB.Recordset cn.Open "Provider=sqloledb-,Data Source=P2:Initial Catalog=pubs;", "sa" Set rs = cn.Execute("Authors")
    

    Notice a substantial difference among all these approaches: The first, the second, and the fourth methods let you easily share the same connection among multiple Recordsets, whereas if you open multiple Recordsets using the third method each Recordset would use a different connection even if you use the same connection string for all of them.

    TIP If you have used a connection string to open a Recordset and then you want to reuse the same implicit Connection object to open another Recordset, you can exploit the ActiveConnection property of the first Recordset, as follows:
     ' Open a new Recordset on the same connection as "rs". Dim rs2 As New ADODB.Recordset rs2.Open "Publishers", rs.ActiveConnection
    

    You can pass many types of strings to the Open method or the Source property and let ADO determine what they represent. This has a price, however, because you force ADO to send one or more queries to the database just to find out whether the source string is the name of a table, a view, a stored procedure, or the text of an SQL command. You can avoid these additional trips to the server by assigning a correct value to the last argument of the Open method, as in the following examples:

     ' Select a different source, based on an array of option buttons. If optSource(0).Value Then              ' Database table Else optSource(1).Value Then            ' Stored procedure ElseIf optSource(2) Then                ' SOL query End If
    
    Cursors and concurrency
    Recordsets can greatly differ in functionality and performance. For example, a Recordset can be updatable or read-only; it can support only the MoveNext command or be fully scrollable. Another key difference is in whether the Recordset contains the actual data or is just a collection of bookmarks that are used to retrieve the data from the database when necessary. It goes without saying that a client-side Recordset based on bookmarks takes fewer resources in the client application but might generate more network traffic when new data needs to be retrieved. Incidentally, this makes it almost impossible to compare the performance of different data retrieval techniques because they depend on too many factors.

    The kinds of operations supported by a Recordset heavily depend upon the cursor on which the Recordset is based. Cursors are a collection of records that can be stored and maintained by the server database or by the client application. As you know from Chapter 13, ADO supports four types of cursors: forward-only read-only, static, keyset, and dynamic.

    Cursors aren't very popular among professional programmers because of their appetite for resources and CPU time. Moreover, cursors often use locks on the database, which further reduces their scalability. Most heavy-duty client/server applications rely on cursorless Recordsets for retrieving data, and then update and insert records using SQL commands or, even better, stored procedures.

    So, what are cursors good for? For one, when you're retrieving small sets of data - some hundreds of records, for example - a cursor is a reasonable choice. Cursors are also necessary when you want to enable your users to browse data and scroll back and forth through it, and you must use a cursor when your user interface is based on bound controls. In some cases, you're more or less forced to use cursors (in particular, client-side cursors) because a few interesting ADO features are available only with them. For example, persistent file-based Recordsets and hierarchical Recordsets can be based only on client-side static cursors, and you can use the Sort method only on this type of Recordset....

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Table of Contents


Acknowledgements ..... xix
Introduction ..... xxi
Part I: The Basics
Chapter 1: First Steps with Microsoft Visual Basic 6 ..... 3
Chapter 2: Introduction to Forms ..... 35
Chapter 3: Intrinsic Controls ..... 91
Chapter 4: Variables and Procedures ..... 151
Chapter 5: The Visual Basic for Applications and Visual Basic Libraries ..... 207
Chapter 6: Classes and Objects ..... 275
Chapter 7: Events, Polymorphism, and Inheritance ..... 333
Chapter 8: Databases ..... 393
Part II: The User Interface
Chapter 9: Advanced Forms and Dialogs ..... 449
Chapter 10: Windows Common Controls: Part I ..... 499
Chapter 11: Windows Common Controls: Part II ..... 561
Chapter 12: Other ActiveX Controls ..... 585
Part III: Database Programming
Chapter 13: The ADO Object Model ..... 629
Chapter 14: ADO at Work ..... 699
Chapter 15: Tables and Reports ..... 757
Part IV: ActiveX Programming
Chapter 16: ActiveX Components ..... 813
Chapter 17: ActiveX Controls ..... 905
Chapter 18: ADO Components ..... 979
Part V: Internet Programming
Chapter 19: Dynamic HTML Applications ..... 1025
Chapter 20: Internet Information Server Applications ..... 1111
Appendix: Windows API Functions ..... 1189
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2002

    The previous review is bogus!

    The person who wrote the previous review is an idiot. Don't listen to a word he is saying. This book is clearly the best Visual Basic Programming book in its class.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2000

    Good ideas, short on some details for beginners

    This book has a lot to offer at the conceptual level, but the nitty-gritty is a bit hard to fill in for a novice like me. There are many bits of code, but few complete working examples, so you have to write the drivers to execute the bits and make something that actually runs. When I did this I found that (i) I had a lot of learning to do through outside reading or trial and error. (Because I'm a beginner?) and (ii) Sometimes the author's code had to be revised. (Maybe he had a different way to drive it?) Still, a very interesting and fun book that expands one's view of what can be done and shows different ways to do it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2000

    Comprehensive Reference Guide

    This book gives a pretty detailed view of basic to advanced features and control properties and explanations. I have found this book useful as an overall reference guide, with good code examples, historical practices (in older versions of VB and explaining the new methods to use in VB 6), and real explanations on why or why to not do something in code. The book is thorough and complete, seemingly better than the Visual Basic Black Book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 1999

    Thrown together, Disorganized, Takes you Nowhere...

    Have spent three days, over 400 pages and nowhere... Install pgm only installs on C:(not easily modified for any other dirve) and text coverage light at best. Plagued with personal pronoun style, 'I suggest' and 'You Should' along with explanations of why the book is written in such a way rather than objectivly presenting programming specifics. Not a reference or how to book for experienced programmers already familar with windows programming or other languages. There may be acurate material included but doesn't seam to be well organised or comprehensive. Material just isn't presented in a progresive build on sequence. As an experienced Windows VC++ and VBScript programmer I'm going to have get another VB book. I didn't find this book up to the ususal MicroSoft Programming Series standard.

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