Programming .Net Components

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Overview

Brilliantly compiled by author Juval Lowy, Programming .NET Components, Second Edition is the consummate introduction to the Microsoft .NET Framework—the technology of choice for building components on Windows platforms. From its many lessons, tips, and guidelines, readers will learn how to use the .NET Framework to program reusable, maintainable, and robust components.Following in the footsteps of its best-selling predecessor, Programming .NET Components, Second Edition has been updated to cover .NET 2.0. It ...

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Programming .NET Components: Design and Build .NET Applications Using Component-Oriented Programming

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Overview

Brilliantly compiled by author Juval Lowy, Programming .NET Components, Second Edition is the consummate introduction to the Microsoft .NET Framework—the technology of choice for building components on Windows platforms. From its many lessons, tips, and guidelines, readers will learn how to use the .NET Framework to program reusable, maintainable, and robust components.Following in the footsteps of its best-selling predecessor, Programming .NET Components, Second Edition has been updated to cover .NET 2.0. It remains one of the few practical books available on this topic. This invaluable resource is targeted at anyone who develops complex or enterprise-level applications with the .NET platform—an ever-widening market. In fact, nearly two million Microsoft developers worldwide now work on such systems.Programming .NET Components, Second Edition begins with a look at the fundamentals of component-oriented programming and then progresses from there. It takes the time to carefully examine how components can simplify and add flexibility to complex applications by allowing users to extend their capabilities. Next, the book introduces a variety of .NET essentials, as well as .NET development techniques. Within this discussion on component development, a separate chapter is devoted to each critical development feature, including asynchronous calls, serialization, remoting, security, and more. All the while, hazardous programming pitfalls are pointed out, saving the reader from experiencing them the hard way.A .NET expert and noted authority on component-oriented programming, Lowy uses his unique access to Microsoft technical teams to the best possible advantage, conveying detailed, insider information in easy-to-grasp, activity-filled language. This hands-on approach is designed to allow individuals to learn by doing rather than just reading. Indeed, after digesting Programming .NET Components, Second Edition, readers should be able to start developing .NET components immediately.Programming .NET Components, Second Edition is the consummate introduction to the Microsoft .NET Framework—the technology of choice for building components on Windows platforms. From its many lessons, tips, and guidelines, readers will learn how to use the .NET Framework to program reusable, maintainable, and robust components.Following in the footsteps of its best-selling predecessor, Programming .NET Components, Second Edition has been updated to cover .NET 2.0. This invaluable resource is targeted at anyone who develops complex or enterprise-level applications with the .NET platform—an ever-widening market.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
.NET is an enormously powerful platform for generating clean, well-designed binary components. Programming .NET Components, Second Edition shows you how to make the most of .NET 2.0 and VS ’05 for component development -- including their new improvements, such as generics, iterators, and anonymous methods.

Like the universally praised First Edition, this book identifies core principles for effective component design and helps you choose among the many options .NET offers you. Juval Löwy systematically covers interface-based programming, lifecycle management, versioning, events, asynchronous calls, multithreading, serialization, persistence, remoting, security, and much more.

There are scores of examples: most in C#, some in VB. Löwy also presents many downloadable utilities, tools, and helper classes intended to improve your productivity and code quality. If you write .NET components, you’ll find this book indispensable. Bill Camarda, from the August 2005 Read Only

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596102074
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 8/15/2005
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 646
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 8.96 (h) x 1.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Juval Lowy is a software architect and the principal of IDesign, a company specializing in .NET architecture consulting and advanced .NET training. Juval is Microsoft's Regional Director for the Silicon Valley, working with Microsoft on helping the industry adopt .NET. Juval participates in the Microsoft internal design reviews for future versions of .NET and related technologies. Juval published numerous articles, regarding almost every aspect of .NET development, and is a frequent presenter at development conferences. Microsoft recognized Juval as a Software Legend as one of the world's top .NET experts and industry leaders. Contact him at www.idesign.net

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Table of Contents

Dedication

Preface

Chapter 1: Introducing Component-Oriented Programming

Chapter 2: .NET Component-Oriented Programming Essentials

Chapter 3: Interface-Based Programming

Chapter 4: Lifecycle Management

Chapter 5: Versioning

Chapter 6: Events

Chapter 7: Asynchronous Calls

Chapter 8: Multithreading and Concurrency Management

Chapter 9: Serialization and Persistence

Chapter 10: Remoting

Chapter 11: Context and Interception

Chapter 12: Security

Appendix A: Interface-Based Web Services

Appendix B: Unifying Windows Forms and ASP.NET Security

Appendix C: Reflection and Attributes

Appendix D: Generics

Appendix E: C# Coding Standard

Colophon

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2005

    VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

    Do you have the skills to design and develop component-based .NET applications? If you don't, this book is for you! Author Juval Lowy, has done an outstanding job of writing a great book that teaches you the skills you need to understand .NET component programming and related system issues as well as, information that is relevant to design options, tips, best practices, and pitfalls. Lowy begins by providing the basic terminology used throughout the book. Next, the author describes the elements of .NET. such as the Common Language Runtime (CLR), .NET programming languages, the code-generation process, assemblies, and building and composing those assemblies. Then, he examines working with interfaces. The author continues by dealing with the way .NET manages objects, and the good and bad implications this has for the overall .NET programming model. In addition, the author next describes the .NET version-control policy and the ways you can deploy and share its components. He also shows you how to publish and subscribe to events in a component-based application. Next, the author describes .NET's built-in support for invoking asynchronous calls on components, the available programming models, their trade-offs, when to use them, and their pitfalls. Then, he explains in depth how to build multithreaded components. The author continues by showing you how to persist and serialize an object's state. In addition, the author demystifies .NET support for remote calls. He also describes a powerful and useful facet of .NET: its ability to provide ways to define custom services via contexts and call interception. Finally, he addresses the rich topic of .NET code-access security. With the preceding in mind, the author has also done an excellent job of writing a book that helps you start developing .NET components immediately, taking full advantage of the .NET development infrastructure and application frameworks. In other words, this book takes advantage of what both .NET 1.1 and .NET 2.0 have to offer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2003

    One of the best on .NET devleopment

    When I was reading the first three chapters of this book I could have sworn that it was miss-titled; it should have been called Component Oriented Programming in .NET. Just so we get this straight, this is not a book about the wonderful components in the .NET Framework that Microsoft has provided -- this is a book about CREATING components in the .NET Framework. <P> The next item that needs to be clarified: What is a component? If you are from the Delphi/VCL world, a component is a non-visual object that can be manipulated in design-time with the mouse and the property browser, while usually being dragged onto a form (TTimer, TDatabase, TSession, TTable, etc). But in this book a component is a class -- the simpler the class, the better. No inheritance unless absolutely necessary, no class hierarchies, but interfaces are cool. <P> Now, once you get beyond the philosophy lessons of the first three chapters, you are left with one outstanding book on practical .NET development. The chapter on Events is worth the price of admission alone. The chapter on Versioning is excellent as well, but the rest of the sections are every bit as good. <P> Many of the topics covered in the book are not things you will find in the help files, or if they are, they are too scattered to be useful. What is covered: a large number of best practices, defensive coding techniques (again the chapter on Events is gold), and general you-really-need-to-know-this topics. <P> One note, some of the topics covered are very large (Remoting and Security are two examples), and if you are interested in those topics, there are other books that deal with them individually. <P> Summary: if you are into creating top-quality .NET software you should own this book.

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