Programming the Web Using XML

Overview

Programming the Web Using XML, by Ellen Pearlman and Eileen Mullin, is another component of the McGraw-Hill Web Developer Series. Designed to help those who have a background in HTML make the transition to XML, this new book provides comprehensive coverage of the rules and standards for XML development. When you start reading this book, not only will you receive a comprehensive foundation to the rules and standards of XML syntax, but you will also be walked through the process of creating XML documents and ...
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Overview

Programming the Web Using XML, by Ellen Pearlman and Eileen Mullin, is another component of the McGraw-Hill Web Developer Series. Designed to help those who have a background in HTML make the transition to XML, this new book provides comprehensive coverage of the rules and standards for XML development. When you start reading this book, not only will you receive a comprehensive foundation to the rules and standards of XML syntax, but you will also be walked through the process of creating XML documents and related files.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780071215046
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The
  • Publication date: 11/1/2003
  • Series: Web Developer Ser.
  • Pages: 430
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 An Overview of XML 1
Learning Objectives 1
Learning the History: The Many Incarnations of SGML into XML 1
Creating One Document for Multiple Platforms and Devices 5
Using XML for Data Exchange 8
Content Sharing with XML 10
Chapter 2 Comparing HTML, XHTML, and XML 19
Learning Objectives 19
From HyperText to XHTML 19
The Limitations of HTML 20
The Emergence of XML 21
Taking the Mid-Road with XHTML 23
Creating an XHTML Document 24
XML Declarations 26
DOCTYPE Declaration and Document Type Definition (DTD) 26
XML Namespaces 27
Reformulating an HTML Document into XML 28
Choosing to Use XHTML or XML 31
Going Further with Namespaces 31
Data and Metadata 34
Chapter 3 Understanding How XML Works: The Fundamentals 41
Learning Objectives 41
Well-Formed and Valid XML 43
Well Formed 43
Valid 44
Tagging an XML Document 45
Very First Example 46
Character References 47
Thinking Through XML 48
Understanding the Tree Structure of a Document 49
Creating a Root Element 51
Comments 52
Elements 52
Empty Element Tags 53
#PCDATA 54
CDATA 55
Attributes (#!ATTLIST) 56
Entities 57
How to Decide: Attribute versus !ELEMENT 57
Chapter 4 Creating Document Type Definitions (DTDs) 63
Learning Objectives 63
Introducing DTDs 64
Imposing Grammar and Structure 64
Checking for Validation 64
Using DTD Syntax 67
Writing Element Declarations 67
Model Groups 69
Free Text 72
Writing Attribute List Declarations 73
Attribute Name 73
Attribute Type 73
Required or Default Values 74
Writing Parameter Entity Declarations 76
Writing Notation Declarations 77
Referencing DTDs 78
Creating External DTD Subsets 81
Using Internal DTD Subsets 81
Using Conditional Sections with Entities 82
Chapter 5 Schemas 89
Learning Objectives 89
DTDs versus Schemas 90
Some Problems with DTDs 91
Thinking of Speed 91
Developing Schemas 92
Namespaces 92
Elements and Attributes 93
Simple and Complex 93
A Little Schema 94
Thinking About Validation 94
Complex Types 99
Deep Schema 103
Grouping 106
Making a Choice 108
Importing Elements 109
Chapter 6 Using XML Parsers and Unicode 117
Learning Objectives 117
Parsers 118
Difference between an XML Parser and an HTMl Parser 119
The Basic Microsoft Parser 119
Creating your Own Valid Document 123
A Word about Errors 125
Using XML Spy 126
Other XML Editors 129
What Is Unicode: The Development of a Global Standard 130
xml: lang Attribute 131
UTF-8 and Beyond 132
Character Sets and Typeface 133
Chapter 7 Applying Cascading Style Sheets 139
Learning Objectives 139
Developing XML Styles 140
How CSS Has Evolved 141
CSS1 141
CSS2 141
CSS3 142
Introducing CSS Syntax 142
Properties and Values 142
Getting Literal: Display, List, and Whitespace Properties 143
More Basic CSS Formatting 149
Backgrounds 149
Text 150
Fonts 154
Borders 155
Margins 157
Padding 158
Advanced CSS Formatting 159
Dimension 160
Classification 160
Positioning 162
Comparing CSS to XSL 163
Ensuring your CSS Is Valid 165
Chapter 8 Applying eXtensible Style Sheets (XSL) 169
Learning Objectives 169
Understanding XSL 170
Using XSLT to Transform XML Documents with XSL 171
Learning the Details of XSL Stylesheets 172
Using XSLT to Transform an XML Document 173
How XSL Uses Templates 175
Filtering 177
Sorting 177
Creating Conditional Statements 178
Styling the Appearance of XML Elements with XSL 182
Debugging XSLT 183
XSL Element References 184
Chapter 9 Linking XML Documents 201
Learning Objectives 201
Introducing XML Linking Language (XLink) 202
Writing an XLink Statement 208
Simple Links 208
Extended Links 209
Creating XLinks in DTDs 213
Introducing XPointer 217
Chapter 10 Scripting with the DOM 225
Learning Objectives 225
An Overview of the DOM 226
DOM-Based Parsers 226
DOM-Based Parsing versus SAX-Based Parsing 228
The DOM's Design Levels 228
The Node Interface 229
Parsing the DOM 232
Browser Support for the DOM 239
Chapter 11 Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) 247
Learning Objectives 247
Advantages of SVG 248
SVG versus Flash 249
SVG Versions 250
SVG Viewer 250
Introducing SVG Syntax 251
The SVG Viewport 253
Basic Shapes 262
More Element Shapes: Circle Element 268
SVG and CSS Stylesheets 269
Ensuring your SVG Is Valid 271
Chapter 12 SMIL 279
Learning Objectives 279
A Brief History of SMIL 281
SMIL 1.0 281
SMIL 2.0 281
How to SMIL 282
Other Ways to SMIL 283
Another Way to View SMIL 283
Basic SMIL 283
Core Elements 283
Media Elements 284
The [left angle bracket]layout[right angle bracket] Module 289
The [left angle bracket]body[right angle bracket] Element 292
Linking Module 295
Chapter 13 Integrating Databases with XML 305
Learning Objectives 305
An Introduction to Using Databases with XML 306
Data-Centric XML 306
Document-Centric XML 308
Going from Data and Documents to Databases 309
Transferring Information between Traditional Databases and XML 311
Relational Databases 311
A Brief Introduction to SQL 312
What's Next: Mapping and Querying 314
Mapping Document Schemas to Database Schemas 315
Querying XML Documents to Transfer Data to Databases 320
Directly Transferring Data to Databases 321
Transferring Information between Native XML Databases and XML Documents 322
Database Vendors 322
Using XML with Oracle 323
Using XML with Microsoft's SQL Server 2000 323
Using XML with IBM's DB2 323
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