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Projecting Illusion: Film Spectatorship and the Impression of Reality
     

Projecting Illusion: Film Spectatorship and the Impression of Reality

4.0 1
by Richard Allen
 

ISBN-10: 0521587158

ISBN-13: 9780521587150

Pub. Date: 05/28/1997

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Projecting Illusion offers a systematic analysis of the impression of reality in the cinema and the pleasure it provides the film spectator. Film affords an especially compelling aesthetic experience that can be considered as a form of illusion akin to the experience of daydream and dream. Examining the concept of illusion and its relationship to fantasy in the

Overview

Projecting Illusion offers a systematic analysis of the impression of reality in the cinema and the pleasure it provides the film spectator. Film affords an especially compelling aesthetic experience that can be considered as a form of illusion akin to the experience of daydream and dream. Examining the concept of illusion and its relationship to fantasy in the experience of visual representation, Richard Allen situates his explanation within the context of an analytical criticism of contemporary film theory.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521587150
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
05/28/1997
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Film Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.43(d)

Table of Contents

1. Althusser, Lacan, and film theory; 2. The lure of metaphysics; 3. Representation, illusion, and the cinema; 4. Cinema, psychoanalysis, and the film spectator; Notes; Filmography; Index.

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Projecting Illusion: Film Spectatorship and the Impression of Reality 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Allen concurs with Noel Carrol's conclusion that contemporary film theorists's characterization of the impression of reality in cinema is wrong, but while Noel Carroll rejects the applicability of the concept of illusion to the cinema, Allen, on the other hand, gives the concept of illusion renewed significance through a detailed investigation of the ways in which illusion may be experienced and the kinds of beliefs that illusion entails.