Projections of War: Hollywood, American Culture, and World War II

Projections of War: Hollywood, American Culture, and World War II

by Thomas Patrick Doherty
     
 

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Projections of War reveals how and why Hollywood marshaled its artistic resources on behalf of the war and interprets the cultural meanings and enduring legacies of the motion picture record of the war years. See more details below

Overview

Projections of War reveals how and why Hollywood marshaled its artistic resources on behalf of the war and interprets the cultural meanings and enduring legacies of the motion picture record of the war years.

Editorial Reviews

Times Literary Supplement
A wide-ranging, lively study....A vivid blend of polemic and social history.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Doherty ( Teenagers and Teenpics ) analyzes the WW II alliance between Hollywood and Washington, an unprecedented partnership that generated new kinds of films. He explains why General George C. Marshall, the Army chief of staff, gave movies a high priority in maintaining troop morale, and how directors such as John Ford, Frank Capra and John Huston employed their artistry in orientation/training films and combat documentaries. Doherty traces Hollywood's transition from a producer of peacetime entertainment to a supplier of homefront melodramas, wartime comedies and martial musicals that were ``information-heavy and value-laden.'' Characterizing the motion-picture industry as ``the foremost purveyor and chief custodian of the images and mythos of 1941-45,'' he describes the changing perceptions reflected in Hollywood movies with regard to the war effort, the enemy, death in battle and other subject of wartime concern. Doherty's penetrating study conveys the extraordinary impact and cultural power of American movies during World War II and, to a lesser degree, during the Korean and Vietnam wars. Photos. (Dec.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
Superlatives apply to this analysis of how World War II affected the American movie industry and how Hollywood's ensuing films influenced both wartime and postwar audiences. Doherty (American Studies, Brandeis Univ.), who is associate editor of Cineaste , evaluates commercial features about war and the homefront, documentaries, Nazi propaganda films, battle footage, and the presentation of black and Japanese American soldiers. A final chapter discusses how succeeding generations viewed war and war films, surveying movies about Korea and Vietnam. Also included are notes and an appendix of the most popular Hollywood films from 1941 to 1945. This engrossing and superbly written book is difficult to put down. Recommended for most libraries.-- Kim Holston, American Inst. for Chartered Property Casualty Underwriters, Malvern, Pa.
Booknews
Examines the relationship between Hollywood cinema and American involvement in World War II as the U.S. Government discovered the sociopolitical power of motion pictures during the 1940s. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231082457
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
01/28/1993
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
376
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.94(h) x 0.87(d)

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