Prokofiev: Suite from Romeo and Juliet (arr. Borisovsky)

Prokofiev: Suite from Romeo and Juliet (arr. Borisovsky)

4.5 4
by Matthew Jones
     
 

Prokofiev created three popular orchestral suites from his ballet "Romeo and Juliet," and with his approval, violist Vadim Borisovsky arranged 13 of the movements for viola and piano. For this recording, David Grunes and violist Matthew Jones made arrangements of three other movements, and Jones and…  See more details below

Overview

Prokofiev created three popular orchestral suites from his ballet "Romeo and Juliet," and with his approval, violist Vadim Borisovsky arranged 13 of the movements for viola and piano. For this recording, David Grunes and violist Matthew Jones made arrangements of three other movements, and Jones and pianist Michael Hampton organized the set so that they follow the order of the action of the ballet. The arrangements are exceptionally well done and for most of this music, the combination of viola and piano sounds like a natural fit, thanks to the versatility of the viola's tonal variety; it can soar like a violin and project the mellow warmth of a cello. The album is so successful both because of the arrangers' skill and Jones' gift in exploiting the instrument's versatility. Hampton, too, plays with plenty of color and drama, and he and Jones create rounded, musically satisfying highlights of music from the ballet. It's a set of pieces that makes a delicious addition to the violists' recital repertoire. Jones' tone is light but rich; he is especially adept at finding the musical and dramatic core of each movement, from the playfulness of "Masks" to the subdued, lyrical melancholy of "Romeo at Friar Lawrence's home" to the delicate sweetness of "Morning Serenade" to the searing emotionality of the "Epilogue." Legendary Israeli/Canadian violist Rivka Golani, the inspiration for some of the most important viola works of the late 20 century, joins Jones and Hampton in several movements arranged for two violas and piano. Naxos' sound is warm, natural, and present. This album should appeal to fans of the viola and of Prokofiev's ballet.

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Product Details

Release Date:
08/30/2011
Label:
Naxos
UPC:
0747313231874
catalogNumber:
8572318
Rank:
261094

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 4. Epilogue: Parting Scene and Death of Juliet  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  2. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 3. Scene 3: Dance of the Lily Maidens  - Sergey Prokofiev  - David Grunes  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  3. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 3. Scene 3: Morning Serenade  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Rivka Golani  - Michael Hampton
  4. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 2. Scene 3: Death of Tybalt  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones  - Matthew Jones
  5. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 2. Scene 3: Death of Mercutio  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  6. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 2. Scene 2: Romeo at Friar Laurence's home  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  7. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 2. Scene 1: Dance with Mandolins  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Rivka Golani  - Michael Hampton
  8. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 2. Scene 1: Carnival  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  9. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 1. Scene 2: Balcony Scene  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  10. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 1. Scene 2: Mercutio  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  11. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 1. Scene 2: Dance of the Knights  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  12. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 1. Scene 2: Masks  - Sergey Prokofiev  - David Grunes  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  13. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 1. Scene 2: Minuet - Arrival of the Guests  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  14. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 1. Scene 2: Juliet as a Young Girl  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  15. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 1. Scene 1: The Street Awakens  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones
  16. Romeo and Juliet, ballet in 4 acts, Op. 64: Act 1. Introduction  - Sergey Prokofiev  - Vadim Borisovsky  - Michael Hampton  - Matthew Jones

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Prokofiev: Suite from Romeo and Juliet (arr. Borisovsky) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Dean_Frey More than 1 year ago
Non-musicans often think of arrangements as being analogous to translations, and we're inclined to worry about what's "lost" in the process. But the adaptive re-use of music might be done for all sorts of practical or artistic reasons, and there is often something gained as well. In the case of Vadim Borisovsky's arrangements for viola & piano of Prokofiev's amazing Romeo & Juliet ballet, I think a better analogue is "distillation". If these clever arrangements don't exactly bring out the "essence" of the score, which is one of the greatest and most colourful orchestral works of the 20th century, they distill some of the many moods of Shakespeare's original work, as they were so imaginatively re-imagined by Prokofiev. This new Naxos disc of Borisovsky's arrangements includes three additional movements, transcribed by David Grunes and Matthew Jones, and all the pieces have been reordered to follow the original ballet score. The choice of viola and piano works well for the more neo-classical scenes, which can sound like movements from an angular trio-sonata. The more romantic scenes take advantage of the full expressive range of the viola (and in a couple of cases, two violas) and the complete dramatic arsenal of the pianist. The Dance of the Knights is amazing: the viola provides so many different sounds through different bowing techniques and the full range of the viola, ncluding harmonics. This is a rich re-orchestration! Violists Matthew Jones and Rivka Golani and pianist Michael Hampton provide passion and expertise in equal parts. They really convinced me of the value of this music!
Sarynka More than 1 year ago
I am an ardent fan of Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet. I've loved it since I first heard it, many years ago. So seeing this arrangement, distilling it to a trio and giving it a chamber music treatment.I was curious. I love the sound of chamber music, and am a big believer in its beautiful timbre. However, in this case, I just wasn't able to draw the same magic from Prokofiev's tragic score. It really does rely on bigger sounds to convey different levels of drama and sorrow. Jones, Golani, and Hampton all do a wonderful job, and I don't fault them whatsoever. However, for me personally, I felt like a good deal was missing without having a full orchestra play the score. Then again, it could be just a quirk of mine.
Due_Fuss More than 1 year ago
Any addition to the paltry viola section of my record collection is a welcome one and this new release of Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet in an arrangement for viola and piano by the renowned Soviet violist, pedagogue, and founder of the Beethoven Quartet, Vadim Borisovsky, is particularly welcome. Borisovsky's arrangement is animated by Jones and Hampton's subtle performance (with Rivka Golani ably joining in on two tracks), which is displayed especially in the pizzicato and harmonic passages on "The Street Awakens," "Mercutio," and "Morning Serenade." The angular jauntiness of "The Dance of the Knights" is also striking. Jones and Hampton offer a skilled performance of this arrangement, sure to please violists and those looking for a new take on this warhorse.
Ted_Wilks More than 1 year ago
Prokofiev's now-famous ballet "Romeo and Juliet" had a difficult start in life. The Kirov Theatre commissioned Prokofiev to compose a ballet, but political changes resulted in cancellation of the planned production of "Romeo and Juliet." Prokofiev signed a contract with the Bolshoi Ballet and completed the score in mid-1935. The music was judged impossible to dance to, and a happy ending was suggested on the argument that the living can dance, the dead cannot. Still the ballet remained unstaged until a 1938 performance in Brno; meanwhile, Prokofiev's success with two Symphonic Suites and a piano version of the ballet attracted the attention of both the Bolshoi and the Kirov companies, who finally staged the ballet in 1940 and 1946, respectively. With Prokofiev's approval, the gifted Moscow-born violist Vadim Borisovsky transcribed an eight-movement suite of this ballet for viola and piano. Later, he transcribed a further five excerpts, two of which required a second viola. Considering the complexity and orchestral lushness of Prokofiev's original score, Borisovsky created a remarkable transcription. Prokofiev's use of leitmotifs in the original ballet is cleverly portrayed by imaginative use of the viola's full register, harmonics, and bowing techniques. The performances are top-notch and the recorded sound is splendid. Those who like the idea of excerpts from this ballet performed as intimate chamber-music will surely enjoy this CD. Ted Wilks