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Prometheus Bound
     

Prometheus Bound

4.0 12
by Aeschylus Aeschylus
 

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Aeschylus was the first of the three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays can still be read or performed, the others being Sophocles and Euripides. He is often described as the father of tragedy: our knowledge of the genre begins with his work and our understanding of earlier tragedies is largely based on inferences from his surviving plays. Only seven of his

Overview

Aeschylus was the first of the three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays can still be read or performed, the others being Sophocles and Euripides. He is often described as the father of tragedy: our knowledge of the genre begins with his work and our understanding of earlier tragedies is largely based on inferences from his surviving plays. Only seven of his estimated seventy to ninety plays have survived into modern times. Fragments of some other plays have survived in quotes and more continue to be discovered on Egyptian papyrus, often giving us surprising insights into his work.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781617208614
Publisher:
Wilder Publications
Publication date:
04/16/2013
Pages:
54
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.13(d)

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Prometheus Bound 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best play I have ever read, and I have read many, and even written a few. The Greek gods/goddesses were barbaric, and it is ironic that Prometheus, who created man and stole fire for him preceded these unjust tyrants, as tradition indicated that with succeeding generations, the gods became more civilized. Hephaestus regretted his orders to chain Prometheus and drive a through his heart to the rock, but performed the instructions of Zeus anyway. Prometheus provides, here, a clear indication of Christian values, and one wonders if the Muslim/Christian/Jewish God might use Prometheus as an alias.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ari skipped inside cheerfully.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He watched te lake roll underneath the dark cloudy skies, anticipating the coming rain.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Uh hi...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whatsbwrong
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yang im locked out of all the results
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Looks around
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She frowns, and says, "oohkay... sorry if i offended you..." she skipped over to Haunted, her Ginger tail flicking back and forth. She said, "hi! Im Eve!"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The name's Zero...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She curled up, yawning.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Watches everyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He makes a notion with his hands and leaves to his study, his tail lashing about violently.