The Promise [NOOK Book]

Overview

In his work as a priest and commentator for FOX News, Father Jonathan Morris has traveled to the troubled spots of the world, meeting with Muslim youth during the rioting in Paris, sitting down with populists at odds with the Church in Venezuela, and investigating human trafficking in Germany. Now Father Jonathan peels back the layers of questions that arise when someone asks, "Why me?" in response to human suffering. With an accessible voice and calming pastoral guidance, Father Jonathan leads readers through ...

See more details below
The Promise

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview

In his work as a priest and commentator for FOX News, Father Jonathan Morris has traveled to the troubled spots of the world, meeting with Muslim youth during the rioting in Paris, sitting down with populists at odds with the Church in Venezuela, and investigating human trafficking in Germany. Now Father Jonathan peels back the layers of questions that arise when someone asks, "Why me?" in response to human suffering. With an accessible voice and calming pastoral guidance, Father Jonathan leads readers through each step of suffering—from doubt and anger to healing and acceptance.

The Promise comprises three parts, each addressing a step in the process of healing. Part 1, "God on Trial," speaks to doubts and anger that arise when we suffer and poses tough questions such as "Does God even care?" and "Why should we trust a God who allows innocent suffering?" Part 2 takes the reader on a journey of finding emotional and spiritual healing from suffering. In part 3 Father Jonathan introduces the five "Principles for Freedom-Living." From living your personal vocation to a step-by-step guide for sketching a plan for your spiritual life, the freedom principles are practical and easily applied to everyday life. Together these five principles have the power to transform what would otherwise be useless suffering into a means of great sanctification and personal fulfillment. While pulling back the layers of philosophy and theology that surround human suffering, Father Jonathan offers not only a deeply spiritual answer but also a practical one to this most fundamental of human questions: Why do we suffer?

The Promise not only addresses how to understand and live with suffering, but also poses the toughest question regarding our relationship to God: Why do we suffer under a benevolent God? Father Jonathan delves into how we can heal from the spiritual, emotional, and even physical scars left behind by suffering. The Promise offers five principles for living a free life, or a life free of the fear that God is not there for us, and offers comfort and hope to those experiencing hard times.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Morris, a Roman Catholic priest and Fox News analyst, draws from his religious tradition as well as his experiences in the world of media to present understandable and genuine advice for those who suffer-in other words, everyone. The "promise" of the title is God's promise to bring something better out of suffering. For some, this may oversimplify the matter, but for others it will provide a glimmer of hope. One of the most useful chapters addresses the various images of God that people hold-all of which are incomplete, and some of which can be seen as spiritually harmful. The author describes these images accurately, ties them in with how people who maintain those images view suffering and uses real-life examples he has encountered in his ministry. The theodicy question (why does a loving God allow suffering?) will always present a quandary to believers of all stripes. Morris is successful in making the claim that it is possible to sustain one's faith in the midst of what is sometimes a cruel world. (Apr.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061736643
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 84,651
  • File size: 706 KB

Meet the Author

Father Jonathan Morris is a Catholic priest in the Archdiocese of New York, an analyst for the Fox News Channel, and program director of The Catholic Channel on SiriusXM and in campus ministry at Columbia University. His books include The Promise: God's Purpose and Plan for When Life Hurts and God Wants You Happy. He lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

The Promise

Chapter One

Do You Even Care, God?

Cast all your worries upon him because he cares for you.
—1 peter 5:7

When a mother kisses the cut on her son's scraped knee and promises, "This will make it go away," she isn't telling a pious fib. Her presence, in her lips and in her words, truly heals the hurt.

The Scriptures say that God is love (1 John 4:8), but when it comes to someone being there for us when we suffer, it seems our earthly mother is a whole lot more reliable than our heavenly Father.

Where is God when we need him most?

A story from the Gospel of Mark explains beautifully one of the key elements of the Christian theology of suffering: God is with us.

If you want to understand Christianity, if you want to understand—or rather to know—Jesus Christ, this is a good place to start. You aren't so sure you believe that a two-thousand-year-old story has anything to do with your pain? That's understandable. For now, I invite you to just listen in.

Jesus is traveling across the sea with his disciples after an evening of preaching to the crowds. He decides to catch up on some sleep while his disciples, seamen by trade, tend to the navigation. Little by little night falls, the breeze builds, a light shower becomes a downpour, and the waves gain strength. Unexpectedly the travelers find themselves in the midst of a violent squall while the rush of cold seawater mercilessly swamps their little boat.

They skate across the deck and holler between themselves, futilely trying to keep their humble vessel afloat.But all is in vain, and they know it. Hope is cast away and swallowed up in the tempest. Where is God in all this?

Jesus was in the stern, asleep on a cushion. They woke him and said to him, "Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?" (Mark 4:38)

In other words, "Of course you don't care, or you wouldn't be in the back of the boat. Do you really think we believe you're sleeping in the middle of a squall?"

Frustration and fear are in that question, but also grief: "We're dying! Don't you care?" That would be the real horror. Maybe God just doesn't care. Maybe all our pleas just fall on deaf ears.

The disciples asked this for the rest of humanity. All eyes are on Jesus. All ears are waiting on his word. The disciples said their piece. They expressed their gripes plain and clear. They accused Jesus, the divine Son of God, of indifference. Can't you just see the nameless disciple with soaked hair pasted to his forehead, glaring into Jesus' eyes as if to say, "Anything to say for yourself, Teacher?"

He woke up, rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, "Quiet! Be still!" The wind ceased and there was great calm.

Then he asked them, "Why are you terrified? Do you not yet have faith?"

They were filled with great awe and said to one another, "Who then is this whom even wind and sea obey?"
(Mark 4:39-41)

The most compelling part of this Gospel story is that it is true. It really happened: the man who calmed the seas and who claimed to be divine submitted himself to the same tumultuous waves as the mortals who complained. Thenarration mirrors our posture before God and his before us. It unveils our ignorance, self-centeredness, and lack of trust. In the face of threatening troubles we question God's power; we doubt his goodness. The God whose blessings we were counting brief moments before is now the target of our pointing finger.

Kim was a real-estate agent with a handsome husband named Jim, who made a good living selling corporate insurance. He had a membership at the country club, and he and their three boys were into sailing. Winter vacation was often spent in Naples, Florida, where they held a timeshare. Private school for the kids, K through 12, was a given. Life was good and fast, but, on top of their busy schedules, they usually squeezed in time for church on Sundays. They weren't religious fanatics, and from what I remember they were proud of that, too. Religion was a cultural thing and served the good purpose of teaching moral principles to the kids and calming what would otherwise be guilt-ridden parental consciences.

In other words, faith was something they did, not lived.

Kim was zipping down the Van Wyck Expressway on her way to pick up Jim at Kennedy Airport one Saturday morning. The Land Cruiser suddenly stalled, and she slowed to a stop on the shoulder. As she huffed and sheepishly went to lift the hood, she managed a nervous laugh. What do I know about cars? she thought. Puzzled and anxious, she cupped her face into her hands and then looked down to see the cars passing beneath her: she was on the overpass. Then came the crash.

An eighteen-wheeler collided with her back bumper and catapulted Kim to the perpendicular freeway stories below. The firstspeeding cars managed to dodge her body. When emergency vehicles arrived on the scene they found her alive, barely.

Kim was transported to a nearby hospital, where—days later, when she came to—she learned she had fractured fourteen bones and suffered a concussion. The doctors informed her husband that she wouldn't be leaving anytime soon.

The suffering had just begun. Kim was in a full-body cast and virtually immobilized. That would be her story for the next twelve weeks. Beyond that, since the moment she awoke, she was in excruciating pain, and no medicine seemed to offer any relief. Jim was beside himself that the doctors couldn't ease her suffering. All he could do was keep her company. The rest of the family did the same, taking long and wearisome shifts.

The Promise. Copyright ? by Jonathan Morris. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction     1
God on Trial
Do You Even Care, God?     9
Reasonable Faith?     19
Someone Like God     27
In God We Trust?     37
Revealed in Suffering     49
In Court     61
Emotional and Spiritual Healing
How Do You Hurt?     83
Heart Damage     103
The Father of Lies     115
Sourcing the Suffering     127
Principles for Freedom-Living
Making a Fundamental Option for Holiness     143
Living My Personal Vocation     151
Uniting My Suffering to His, for Others     161
Being the Hands and Feet of Christ     173
Sketching a Plan for the Spiritual Life     197
Court of Appeals     209
Earthquakes and Tsunamis: Is God Responsible?     217
Moral Evil, the Wicked Kind: And the Painful, Logical Consequences of Misused Freedom     225

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

The Promise
God's Purpose and Plan for When Life Hurts

Chapter One

Do You Even Care, God?

Cast all your worries upon him because he cares for you.
—1 peter 5:7

When a mother kisses the cut on her son's scraped knee and promises, "This will make it go away," she isn't telling a pious fib. Her presence, in her lips and in her words, truly heals the hurt.

The Scriptures say that God is love (1 John 4:8), but when it comes to someone being there for us when we suffer, it seems our earthly mother is a whole lot more reliable than our heavenly Father.

Where is God when we need him most?

A story from the Gospel of Mark explains beautifully one of the key elements of the Christian theology of suffering: God is with us.

If you want to understand Christianity, if you want to understand—or rather to know—Jesus Christ, this is a good place to start. You aren't so sure you believe that a two-thousand-year-old story has anything to do with your pain? That's understandable. For now, I invite you to just listen in.

Jesus is traveling across the sea with his disciples after an evening of preaching to the crowds. He decides to catch up on some sleep while his disciples, seamen by trade, tend to the navigation. Little by little night falls, the breeze builds, a light shower becomes a downpour, and the waves gain strength. Unexpectedly the travelers find themselves in the midst of a violent squall while the rush of cold seawater mercilessly swamps their little boat.

They skate across the deck and holler between themselves,futilely trying to keep their humble vessel afloat. But all is in vain, and they know it. Hope is cast away and swallowed up in the tempest. Where is God in all this?

Jesus was in the stern, asleep on a cushion. They woke him and said to him, "Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?" (Mark 4:38)

In other words, "Of course you don't care, or you wouldn't be in the back of the boat. Do you really think we believe you're sleeping in the middle of a squall?"

Frustration and fear are in that question, but also grief: "We're dying! Don't you care?" That would be the real horror. Maybe God just doesn't care. Maybe all our pleas just fall on deaf ears.

The disciples asked this for the rest of humanity. All eyes are on Jesus. All ears are waiting on his word. The disciples said their piece. They expressed their gripes plain and clear. They accused Jesus, the divine Son of God, of indifference. Can't you just see the nameless disciple with soaked hair pasted to his forehead, glaring into Jesus' eyes as if to say, "Anything to say for yourself, Teacher?"

He woke up, rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, "Quiet! Be still!" The wind ceased and there was great calm.

Then he asked them, "Why are you terrified? Do you not yet have faith?"

They were filled with great awe and said to one another, "Who then is this whom even wind and sea obey?"
(Mark 4:39-41)

The most compelling part of this Gospel story is that it is true. It really happened: the man who calmed the seas and who claimed to be divine submitted himself to the same tumultuous waves as the mortals who complained. The narration mirrors our posture before God and his before us. It unveils our ignorance, self-centeredness, and lack of trust. In the face of threatening troubles we question God's power; we doubt his goodness. The God whose blessings we were counting brief moments before is now the target of our pointing finger.

Kim was a real-estate agent with a handsome husband named Jim, who made a good living selling corporate insurance. He had a membership at the country club, and he and their three boys were into sailing. Winter vacation was often spent in Naples, Florida, where they held a timeshare. Private school for the kids, K through 12, was a given. Life was good and fast, but, on top of their busy schedules, they usually squeezed in time for church on Sundays. They weren't religious fanatics, and from what I remember they were proud of that, too. Religion was a cultural thing and served the good purpose of teaching moral principles to the kids and calming what would otherwise be guilt-ridden parental consciences.

In other words, faith was something they did, not lived.

Kim was zipping down the Van Wyck Expressway on her way to pick up Jim at Kennedy Airport one Saturday morning. The Land Cruiser suddenly stalled, and she slowed to a stop on the shoulder. As she huffed and sheepishly went to lift the hood, she managed a nervous laugh. What do I know about cars? she thought. Puzzled and anxious, she cupped her face into her hands and then looked down to see the cars passing beneath her: she was on the overpass. Then came the crash.

An eighteen-wheeler collided with her back bumper and catapulted Kim to the perpendicular freeway stories below. The first speeding cars managed to dodge her body. When emergency vehicles arrived on the scene they found her alive, barely.

Kim was transported to a nearby hospital, where—days later, when she came to—she learned she had fractured fourteen bones and suffered a concussion. The doctors informed her husband that she wouldn't be leaving anytime soon.

The suffering had just begun. Kim was in a full-body cast and virtually immobilized. That would be her story for the next twelve weeks. Beyond that, since the moment she awoke, she was in excruciating pain, and no medicine seemed to offer any relief. Jim was beside himself that the doctors couldn't ease her suffering. All he could do was keep her company. The rest of the family did the same, taking long and wearisome shifts.

The Promise
God's Purpose and Plan for When Life Hurts
. Copyright © by Jonathan Morris. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 24 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Suffering and Healing: A Priest's Approach

    Father Morris has written a wonderful book addressing the age-old question: if God loves us, then why is there so much suffering in the world? Rather than providing the reader with the standard, church-approved answers, Father Morris uses real life people and situations to illustrate how that although we may not understand God's plan and fully comprehend the nature of his love for us, God offers us a way to deal with the suffering and transform our spiritual life. His "Principles for Freedom-Living" are a guide that anyone, regardless of personal religous beliefs or preferences can use to better their existence in this world.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    great bestseller offering courage and hope

    "the promise" by father jonathan morris is a very exellent book that offers everyone no matter what faith alot of courage and peace from their life whean they are facing tough storms. what is special about this book is it has some exellent questians and awnsers in the back of the book that I think we offten struggle with and I know I do. this is a great book for a Bible study or discussuion group to use. great gift idea for a friend or family member.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2008

    Excellent book on this subject

    The author takes you through the steps of recognizing the answer of why bad things happen and God allows them. It is thought provoking and filled with examples and life experiences.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 13, 2009

    Compelling Answers to Hard Questions

    Father Jonathan Morris has achieved a difficult feat with The Promise: His book is accessible to readers from all walks of life, yet never offers facile platitudes in answer to that universal question, "Why is there suffering?" He examines the many forms of suffering in the light of Christ's teachings and example, and arrives at answers that are simple, yet profound. While the book is written from the perspective of a Catholic Christian, anyone could benefit from reading this book, regardless of their creed or lack of one.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 6, 2009

    A practical and common sense approach to faith

    Very readable, a common sense approach to faith.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2008

    finding gods purposes whean your hurting

    father jonathan morris(who is the faith commentator on fox news) has writtion a very remarkable book 'the promise' which address`s the different questians that we face whean life hands us alot of discouragment that really challenges our faith and breaks our heart. this bestseller offers some inspirational awnsers that gave me peaceful solutions and I was very pleased with the exellent scripture references as well as the wonderful and most helpful study guide. this is very hard to put down and is a great gift idea for a friend or family member and would be great for a Bible study.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 5, 2010

    Thought Provoking Read

    This book is well written and approaches a very deep and philosophical question in a very straight-forward manner. While it probably would not satisfy someone will little or no faith, anyone considering themselves a person of faith, who struggles with the idea of God allowing tragedies to befall innocent people will find plenty to ponder and consider. It has certainly helped me to consider the whole subject in ways I did not before.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 12, 2009

    Amazing, comforting book that can be reread many times.

    This book presents God's caring hand in a wonderful, readable way. It is the kind of book you will want to have in a handy place where you can refer to it again and again. It draws you in closer to Jesus, and helps you understand how much He loves you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    This was a great book. He puts things in easy simple terms. His "Principles for Freedom-Living" is a must read. I've been to church my whole life, but found a lot of Aha moments in this book. It is very insightful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    book of courage and hope

    "the promise" is a very special bestseller writtion by father jonathan morris that shows that no matter what kind of storms or tough times we are facing that God is always with us and has a plan of peace for us and has a great amount of courage for our life to help us through what ever suffering we may be dealing with. I really love this book it is very hard to put down. the writer has scripture and alot of questians and awnsers in the back of the book which I think is special cause these are the kind of questians that I often think about. this is a great book for discussion groups or a Bible study or a birthday gift for someone special.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)