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Promoting Civility in Pharmacy Education
     

Promoting Civility in Pharmacy Education

by Bruce A. Berger
 

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Why can't we all just get along??

Incivility is a growing problem within all aspects of pharmaceutical education and, indeed, across the spectrum of higher education. Promoting Civility in Pharmacy Education describes the issues involved and provides practical solutions. With this book, you'll learn which teaching characteristics lead to more/less

Overview

Why can't we all just get along??

Incivility is a growing problem within all aspects of pharmaceutical education and, indeed, across the spectrum of higher education. Promoting Civility in Pharmacy Education describes the issues involved and provides practical solutions. With this book, you'll learn which teaching characteristics lead to more/less incivility in the classroom, how to make your expectations known in a nonconfrontational manner, and how to respond to incivilities from students, administrators, and faculty.

Promoting Civility in Pharmacy Education examines ways to deal with incivility in:

  • large classroom settings—with a discussion of honor codes and a sample syllabus
  • small classroom/small group settings, including discussion of the role of the group in controlling and preventing incivilities and of the negative effect of incivility on group learning
  • clinical settings, with a focus on insubordination, missed deadlines, sloppy/incomplete work, and unprofessional conduct

Some of the problems this book will help you address include:

“passive” incivilities such as inattention, lateness, asking for extensions on assignments, and making excuses, as well as mild disruptions such as cell phone conversations during class time “overt” or “active” incivilities, including vulgar language, insulting comments, direct challenges to the teacher's authority, and physical threats

The book also explores the incivilities brought on by prejudice and racism, incivilities that occur between graduate students and their teachers, the important relationship between professionalism and civility, and issues that new faculty face as they adjust to new teaching positions.

Because it is packed with practical solutions to a large number of problems, Promoting Civility in Pharmacy Education is a must-have for anyone involved with pharmacy education. Make it a part of your professional collection today!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789021212
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
11/28/2003
Series:
Journal of Pharmacy Teaching Series
Pages:
330
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.50(d)

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What People are Saying About This

Penny Booth Page
A MUST-READ for all who teach and supervise pharmacy students. Whether teaching to large classes, small groups, experiential learning, or graduate students, this book offers insight into integrating proper student behavior, pre-professional expectations, and student/faculty interactions. . . . The chapters on promoting civility from the perspective of the new faculty member and on boundary violations in student/faculty relationships are especially valuable, as are the case studies and scenarios depicting common problems that may result in uncivil interactions and possible solutions.
Gerald E. Schumacher, PharmD, PhD, Professor of Pharmacy, Northeastern University
David E. Smith
WILL APPEAL TO FACULTY interested in creating learning environments that encourage not only polite behavior but patient-oriented professional roles and responsibilities. . . . Explores causes of and cures for incivility in this new academic environment. Though the authors do provide strategies for increasing civility in large classrooms, small groups, experiential programs, and graduate education, the book's eight essays are not merely lists of schoolmarm-ish techniques for crowd control. They explore deeper moral issues, demonstrating that the promotion of educational civility involves the practice, modeling, and inculcation of professional responsibilities.
Thomas D. Zlatic, PhD, Professor of English and Director of the Norton Writing Center, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

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