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Pronouncing Dictionary of Proper Names: Pronunciations for More than 28,000 Proper Names, Selected for Currency, Frequency, or Difficulty of Pronunciation
     

Pronouncing Dictionary of Proper Names: Pronunciations for More than 28,000 Proper Names, Selected for Currency, Frequency, or Difficulty of Pronunciation

by John K. Bollard
 
This dictionary provides the key to correct pronunciation for more than 28,000 names that are frequently encountered in speech and reading, including personal and place names, brand names, names of businesses, breeds of animals, and other categories missing from most dictionaries. 5,000 new entries have been added to this new edition. Entries are briefly identified

Overview

This dictionary provides the key to correct pronunciation for more than 28,000 names that are frequently encountered in speech and reading, including personal and place names, brand names, names of businesses, breeds of animals, and other categories missing from most dictionaries. 5,000 new entries have been added to this new edition. Entries are briefly identified and current English pronunciations are given, both in simplified phonetic respelling and in a formal transcription. In many cases, alternative or variant pronunciations that may be considered as acceptable are also shown.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Not a comprehensive pronouncing dictionary, this new volume concentrates on 23,000 proper names most frequently found in speech, broadcast, and print. Comparable American pronouncing dictionaries are becoming quite dated, with NBC Handbook of Pronunciation (HarperCollins, 1984. 4th ed.) and Samuel Noory's Dictionary of Pronunciation (Cornwall Bks., 1981. 4th ed.) the major works in the field. Pronunciations appear in side-by-side columns in both an easy-to-understand respelling system, which uses combinations of letters to represent sounds and keeps diacriticals and other symbols to a minimum, and in the symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet used by language specialists and in standard dictionaries. The names are briefly identified but not fully defined. Pronunciations reflect variations in American dialects and represent local or personal pronunciation. For instance, Maya Angelou's own pronunciation of her last name is given in addition to two other common pronunciations. This work is easy to use and well designed; a key to the respelling system appears at the foot of each page, with a fuller form of the key printed inside the front and back covers. The explanations contained in the introduction are detailed and useful. Recommended for most collections.-- Paul D'Alessandro, Portland P.L., Me.
Zom Zoms
"Traditional lexicography meets the latest technology" proclaims the press release accompanying this book. Pronunciation for 23,000 names is given in two forms: simple respelling and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) used by linguists. After pronunciations were written by editor Bollard, they were loaded into a speech-synthesizing computer and the synthesized entries were listened to for correction and refinement Entries include place-names currently in the news and "other important places, celebrities, political and historical figures, company and product names, biblical names, and literary references." There is a strong emphasis on current names, which may explain the inclusion of the pop groups INXS and Depeche Mode, and the exclusion of ABBA. On the other hand, the Marquis de Sade is included, but pop singer Sade is not. An emphasis on terms "difficult to pronounce" does not explain the inclusion of Bruce Willis and Hal Linden. Some names that are important in the academic world are not here: no Simone Weil, Merleau Ponty, or Julia Kristeva, for example. Also lacking are TV star Xuxa and Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic The introduction explains variant U.S. regional pronunciation for such words as "Mary" and the two pronunciation systems used in the book. The running footers on each page of text provide a key to the respelled pronunciations. A key to the symbols used in the IPA is on the endsheet Some of these personal and place-names will appear in geographic dictionaries or in desk dictionaries, though usually only with some variant of IPA pronunciation. Several encyclopedias provide pronunciation for places and people that appear as entries. The "NBC Handbook of Pronunciation" (4th ed., rev., Harper, 1991) also uses a respelling system for more than 21,000 words, but most are not proper names. Although it's unfortunate that the "Pronouncing Dictionary" wastes space on such names as Sonny Bono and Toni Tenille, academic and public libraries will want to consider purchase.
Booknews
Entries for some 28,000 frequently encountered or difficult to pronounce names of places, celebrities, political and historical figures, company and product names, Biblical names, and literary references include pronunciations in both a simplified respelling and in the phonetic symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), as well as the world's most concise definitions. Five thousand proper names have been added to the second edition, including names that have come into prominence in recent years through current events, popular culture, and sports. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780780800984
Publisher:
Omnigraphics, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/28/1997
Pages:
1097
Product dimensions:
7.53(w) x 10.31(h) x 2.59(d)

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