Prophecy

Prophecy

2.0 2
by Justin Wilkerson
     
 
Cuzak Rudir is the newly crowned King of the Specter Alliance. His coronation has left the position as head of the military empty. When he decides to promote his longtime friend, Gregor, over his own brother, Destor, the King's brother takes matters into his own hands. Destor travels to the Alliance's adversary, Mars, and returns with an enemy fleet and a mind for

Overview

Cuzak Rudir is the newly crowned King of the Specter Alliance. His coronation has left the position as head of the military empty. When he decides to promote his longtime friend, Gregor, over his own brother, Destor, the King's brother takes matters into his own hands. Destor travels to the Alliance's adversary, Mars, and returns with an enemy fleet and a mind for revenge. Amidst the fighting a discovery is made. A book written generations ago, foretelling the war and depicting Cuzak as a hero with supernatural abilities. Now, Cuzak must come to grips with his role in the prophecy as he tries to protect his people from his traitorous brother. But what is driving his brother's actions? Is it simply anger, or an even more mysterious force, long forgotten by the people of Specter?

Prophecy is the first book in The Ghost Wars Saga, a series that blends the science fiction and fantasy genres into an action packed adventure of space ships and dragons, lasers and magic.

Editorial Reviews

Amazon review - Anita Huckleberry
Justin Wilkerson does a very good job combining science fiction, paranormal, suspense, with action/adventure and combines all this with excellent writing skills. If you enjoy Sci-Fi/futuristic novels, enjoy well written series, then this will be one book, and in time series, that you'll want on your Kindle or book shelf.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014918589
Publisher:
Justin Wilkerson
Publication date:
07/31/2012
Series:
The Ghost Wars Saga , #1
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,041,967
File size:
756 KB

Meet the Author

Raised in the Pacific Northwest by a family of science fiction lovers, Justin Wilkerson developed his fascination with science early in life. A Meteorologist by education, he took up writing as a hobby while at university. His other hobbies include running a forecasting blog for the Portland area, creating the occasional video, and learning new software.

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Prophecy 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although the style is a bit rough, the story and premise hold together quite well. I find the 'mixture of genre' to be refreshing. One can only read so many 'fantasy', SciFi, vampire, etc... novels before the are all alike. The detail in the battles can be daunting to those who do not read techno-novels but to anyone who waded through "Hunt for the Red October" they will find "Prophecy" to be a cake walk.
deesy58 More than 1 year ago
This story was either written by an author with no grasp of English grammar and punctuation, or it was not edited at all. Perhaps both. The military ranks of army and navy are intermixed and synthesized in a way that indicates that the author did not do much research when undertaking this writing project. The author seems fixated on the matter of height, telling us the height in feet and inches of each new character as he or she is introduced in the first half of the book. For whatever reason, this story appears to be a mashup of Science Fiction, Ghost Stories and Fantasy. The mixture of genres does not work. Clearly, Science Fiction should be based on Science, but the excruciating minutiae with which space battles are described in this book is truly mind boggling. The overwhelming barrage of military nomenclature for missiles, torpedoes and lasers, when combined with detailed acceleration rates in both kilometers per-second squared, and in "gees" (gravities) becomes nothing less than mind-numbing. Chapter Twenty Three begins with the "purple prose" sentence: "It was a dark and stormy summer day ..." To me, those words conjure images of Snoopy of the "Peanuts" comic strip typing away on his typewriter while sitting on his doghouse. Oh my! Either this is the worst book ever written, or the whole thing is a giant joke perpetrated by the author on his readers.