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Prose Fiction and Early Modern Sexualities in England, 1570-1640

Overview

This book brings together twelve new essays which situate the arguments about the multiple constructions of sexualities in prose fiction within contemporary critical and theoretical debates about the body, desire, gender, print and manuscript culture, postcoloniality, and cultural geography. Looking at Sidney's Arcadia, Wroth's Urania, Lyly's Euphues; fictions by Gascoigne, Riche, Parry, Johnson, and Brathwaite; as well as Hellenic romances, rogue fictions, and novelle, the essays expand and challenge current ...

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Overview

This book brings together twelve new essays which situate the arguments about the multiple constructions of sexualities in prose fiction within contemporary critical and theoretical debates about the body, desire, gender, print and manuscript culture, postcoloniality, and cultural geography. Looking at Sidney's Arcadia, Wroth's Urania, Lyly's Euphues; fictions by Gascoigne, Riche, Parry, Johnson, and Brathwaite; as well as Hellenic romances, rogue fictions, and novelle, the essays expand and challenge current critical arguments about early modern sexualities, the gendering of labor, female eroticism, queer masculinity, sodomy, male friendship, cross-dressing, heteroeroticism, incest, and the gendering of poetic creativity.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"From popular rogue pamphlets and collections of novelle to courtly romances like Philip Sidney's Arcadia and Mary Wroth's Urania, English Renaissance prose fiction enticed male and female readers alike with fantastic, exotic, sometimes violent, tales of love and sexual passion. Rescuing these texts from critical neglect, this volume richly demonstrates the role that prose fiction played in the fashioning and circulation of sexual discourses during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It gathers historically and theoretically informed essays that shrewdly analyze the narrative and ideological strategies employed by prose fiction writers to represent the erotic plurality of English Renaissance literature and culture. In the process, this collection offers exciting new perspectives not only on sexuality (including, but not limited to, its 'hetero' and 'homo' varieties), but also on racial difference, religious conflict, market economics, male friendship, female chastity, and gender performance in the early modern period."—Mario DiGangi, Associate Professor of English, Lehman College and The Graduate Center, CUNY

"Prose Fiction and Early Modern Sexualities in England, 1570-1640, offers a significant contribution to early modern scholarship and recent work on the history of sexuality. By foregrounding the formal, historical and political aspects of prose fiction, the essays work collectively to complicate assumptions about the 'normative' sexual subject and expand the field of erotic representation for historians of literature, gender and sexuality. This important book will be of interest to scholars and students of early modern literature and culture, and to all interested in archival and theoretical resources available for advancing the history of sexuality."—Carla Mazzio, University of Chicago

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781403963888
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 1/3/2004
  • Series: Early Modern Cultural Studies
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Meet the Author

Constance C. Relihan is Hargis Professor of English at Auburban University.

Goran V. Stanivukovic is Associate Professor of English at Saint Mary's University, Halifax.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Prose Fiction and Early Modern Sexualities in England, 1570-1640—Constance C. Relihan and Goran V. Stanivukovic
Part I: Gender, Genre, and Sexuality
Love, Chastity and Woman's Erotic Power: Greek Romances in Elizabethan and Jacobean Context—Darlene C. Greenhalgh
• "Dissordinate Desire" and the Construction of Geographic Otherness in the Early Modern Novella—Constance C. Relihan
• Passion and Reason in Sir Philip Sidney's Arcadia—Lisa Hopkins
• The Thigh and the Sword: Gender, Genre, and Sexy Dressing in Sidney's New Arcadia—Steven Mentz
• Prisoners of Love: Crosscultural and Supernatural Desires in Lady Mary Wroth's Urania—Sheila T. Cavanagh
Part II: Queer Fictions * Same Difference: Homo and Allo in Lyly's Euphues—Stephen Guy-Bray
• Rogue-Sirens: Urban Seductions and the Collapse of Amicitia—Morgan Holmes
• Gelding Gascoigne—Alan Stewart
• "Knights in Armes": The Homoerotics of the English Renaissance Prose Romances—Goran V. Stanivukovic
Part III: Textuality and Desire
• Emasculating Romance: Historical Fiction in the Protectorate—Elizabeth Sauer
• Sidney, Gascoigne and the "Bastard Poets"—Robert W. Maslen
• Unfolding the Shepherdess: A Revision of Pastoral—Lori Humphrey Newcomb
• Afterword

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