Prosthetic Memory: The Transformation of American Remembrance in the Age of Mass Culture / Edition 1

Prosthetic Memory: The Transformation of American Remembrance in the Age of Mass Culture / Edition 1

by Alison Landsberg
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0231129270

ISBN-13: 9780231129275

Pub. Date: 04/07/2004

Publisher: Columbia University Press

Instead of compartmentalizing American experience, the technologies of mass culture make it possible for anyone, regardless of race, ethnicity, or gender to share collective memories—to assimilate as personal experience historical events through which they themselves did not live. That's the provocative argument of this book, which examines the formation and

Overview

Instead of compartmentalizing American experience, the technologies of mass culture make it possible for anyone, regardless of race, ethnicity, or gender to share collective memories—to assimilate as personal experience historical events through which they themselves did not live. That's the provocative argument of this book, which examines the formation and potential of privately felt public memories. Alison Landsberg argues that mass cultural forms such as cinema and television in fact contain the still-unrealized potential for a progressive politics based on empathy for the historical experiences of others. The result is a new form of public cultural memory—"prosthetic" memory—that awakens the potential in American society for increased social responsibility and political alliances that transcend the essentialism and ethnic particularism of contemporary identity politics.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231129275
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
04/07/2004
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Introduction: Memory, Modernity, Mass Culture1. Prosthetic Memory2. The Prosthetic Imagination: Immigration Narratives and the 'Melting Down' of Difference3. Remembering Slavery: Childhood, Desire, and the Interpellative Power of the Past4. America, the Holocaust, and the Mass Culture of Memory: The 'Object' of RememberingEpilogue: Towards a Radical Practice of Memory

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