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Protecting Endangered Species in the United States: Biological Needs, Political Realities, Economic Choices
     

Protecting Endangered Species in the United States: Biological Needs, Political Realities, Economic Choices

by Jason F. Shogren
 

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ISBN-10: 052108749X

ISBN-13: 9780521087490

Pub. Date: 12/11/2008

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Protecting Endangered Species in the United States is a collection of original papers by economists, biologists and political scientists with a common theme—protecting species at risk while safeguarding social order is a policy challenge that entangles biology, politics, and economics. The volume begins by assessing the biological needs that define the

Overview

Protecting Endangered Species in the United States is a collection of original papers by economists, biologists and political scientists with a common theme—protecting species at risk while safeguarding social order is a policy challenge that entangles biology, politics, and economics. The volume begins by assessing the biological needs that define the endangered species problem. The authors then explore the political realities that delimit the debate—who pays the costs and receives the benefits, and how interest groups affect species protection. The book addresses the economic choices that must be confronted for effective protection strategies including incentive schemes to promote preservation on public and private land.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521087490
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
12/11/2008
Pages:
440
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword Norman Meyers; 1. The nature of endangered species Gregory D. Hayward, Jason F. Shogren and John Tschirhart; Part I. Biological Needs: 2. Endangered thought, political animals Boyd Gibbons; 3. A market solution for preserving biodiversity: the Black Rhino Gardner Brown and David Layton; 4. Extinction, recovery, and the Endangered Species Act Steven R. Beissinger and John Perrine; 5. On biological needs: comments on Gibbons, Brown and Layton, and Beissinger and Perrine Thomas Crocker; Replies by authors; Part II. Political Realities: 6. Interest group behavior and Endangered Species Protection Amy Whritenour Ando; 7. Beyond cute and fuzzy: science and politics in the US Endangered Species Act David Cash; 8. Community politics and Endangered Species protection Stephen M. Meyer; 9. On political realities: comments on Ando, Cash and Meyer Clifford Nowell; Replies by authors; Part III.1. Current Approaches: 10. The Endangered Species Act and critical habitat designation: an integrated biological and economic approach Gary Watts, William Noonan, Henry Maddux and David S. Brookshire; 11. The revealed demand for a public good: evidence from Endangered and Threatened Species Don Coursey; 12. The ESA through Coase-colored glasses Terry Anderson; 13. On current approaches: comments on Wattes, et al., Coursey and Anderson John Loomis; Replies by authors; Part III.2. Future Incentives: 14. The economics of 'takings' in a multi-parcel model with a powerful government Robert Innes; 15. Investment, information collection and Endangered Species conservation on private land Stephan Polasky; 16. Compensation schemes for Endangered Species protection Rodney B. W. Smith and Jason F. Shogren; 17. On future incentives: comments on Innes, Polasky, and Smith and Shorgen Rob Godby; Replies by authors; Part IV. Summary and Database: 18. Why economics matters for endangered species protection Jason F. Shogren and John Tschirhart et al.; 19. The database on the economics and management of endangered species (DEMES) David Cash, Andrew Metrick, Todd Schatzki and Martin Weitzman; Index.

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