Protein Counter

Protein Counter

4.3 3
by Annette B. Natow, Jo-Ann Heslin
     
 

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Every day your body needs protein to build and replace millions of cells. And your need for protein goes up during stress, exercise, weight loss, illness, injury, pregnancy, and after surgery. Now, the two nationally recognized registered dietitians and nutritionists who created the national bestsellers The Fat Counter and The Cholesterol Counter give you the most

Overview

Every day your body needs protein to build and replace millions of cells. And your need for protein goes up during stress, exercise, weight loss, illness, injury, pregnancy, and after surgery. Now, the two nationally recognized registered dietitians and nutritionists who created the national bestsellers The Fat Counter and The Cholesterol Counter give you the most complete, up-to-date protein information: - Protein, fat, carbohydrate, and calorie values for 15,000 brand-name and generic foods, including energy bars and drinks, and soy, organic, and vegetarian products - Tips for using amino acid and protein supplements - Four easy steps to find your personalized daily protein requirement based on your activity level, sex, weight, and overall health - How muscles actually use the protein in the food you eat - Easy-to-understand information on reading food labels, on protein additives, and much more!

Editorial Reviews

Bob Arnot
Protein is back... -- Men's Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780743464345
Publisher:
Pocket Books
Publication date:
01/28/2003
Pages:
512
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 4.22(h) x 1.12(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Annette B. Natow, Ph.D., C.D.N., and Jo-Ann Heslin, M.A., R.D., C.D.N. are the authors of thirty books on nutrition, including two college textbooks. Both are former faculty members of Adelphi University and the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center. They were the editors of the Journal of Nutrition for the Elderly for 23 years and serve as editorial board members for Environmental Nutrition Newsletter, Vitality, and American Baby Magazine.

For more information on Annette B. Natow and Jo-Ann Heslin, plus articles and advice, go to: www.thenutritionexperts.com.

Jo-Ann Heslin, M.A., is a professionally trained, registered dietitian and also a regular columnist for HealthNewsDigest.com. She is the coauthor of thirty books on nutrition. For more information, visit: TheNutritionExperts.com.

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Protein Counter 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
EatingIsFreedom More than 1 year ago
This is a no-frills guide to food content for many foods. I need 70 grams of protein a day, and this helps me figure out how much I'm getting when it's not marked on the label, or when I'm out. I've lost 70 pounds using it, and its structure is very good for what I want. Some foods are not included (due to space limitations or excessive variation for the item), but one can usually extrapolate from something like it in the listings. This is a good feature, since it makes one think -- and since thoughtful, mindful self-management seems to be key for those of us who are chronically overweignt. (It seems that we don't have the sort of appetite or food judgment that really slender folks do. At least, I don't. The book helps.) When home, I weigh my food. That helps with portion control. I haven't been hungry yet. There is a protein-needs estimator and a BMI formula in the front of the book, and they are fairly good -- and agree with what my nutritionist says. I carry the book everywhere and have a good bit of it memorized. Sooner or later, I'll get to know the foods I need -- and then I'll be in better control. After 61 years of fighting weight, I'm being successful, and this book is helping. Weight loss is calories in vs calories out with good nutrition being essential throughout. Anything else tends to be temporary and why, I ask, go through THAT agony more than once?