Protists: Algae, Amoebas, Plankton, and Other Protists

Protists: Algae, Amoebas, Plankton, and Other Protists

by Rona Arato
     
 

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A Class Of Their Own provides a close-up look at six major classifications of living organisms based on the most up-to-date scientific data. Using clear, detailed descriptions and stunning photographs and illustrations, each volume examines a specific kingdom or domain, the fascinating distinctions among its various members, and the ways in which each group's

Overview

A Class Of Their Own provides a close-up look at six major classifications of living organisms based on the most up-to-date scientific data. Using clear, detailed descriptions and stunning photographs and illustrations, each volume examines a specific kingdom or domain, the fascinating distinctions among its various members, and the ways in which each group's life-forms interact with members of other groups, including humans.

The intriguing book shows how this group's unusual members are generally classified according to an absence of a feature, such as the lack of a complicated cell structure. Learn about such exotic organisms as algae, amoebas, and slime molds-all of them protests. Case histories examine the importance of plankton to the marine food chains and the role of protists in various diseases.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Amy S. Hansen
Part of the series called "A Class of Their Own," this well organized and easily understood book is photo rich. It shows electron microscope images of tiny protists and also images of larger organisms such as whales interacting with them. Although protists will be unfamiliar to many readers, they were first identified in 1674 by Dutch scientist Anton van Leeuwenhoek. He called the things he saw "animalcules" or little animals. Now scientists know that these organisms are neither plants nor animals, neither bacteria nor fungi. They are defined as much by what they are not as what they are. Protists are actually huge beds of kelp. They are also the tiny green algae that produce much of Earth's oxygen. They are at once exotic and so standard as to be almost boring. They cause human diseases such as malaria, and as plankton, they provide food for some of the biggest creatures in the ocean. This book describes how protists move through the water, how they reproduce, and how scientists group them. Algae, for example, are grouped at least in part by their color, so green algae are a different species than red algae. The brilliant photos and illustrations keep the eyes moving across the page. Although the series title is confusing because the term class is also used when grouping species correctly, the book itself is excellent. Backmatter includes glossary, list of more information, and index. Reviewer: Amy S. Hansen

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780778753773
Publisher:
Crabtree Publishing Company
Publication date:
02/28/2010
Series:
Class of Their Own Series
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
1110L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

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