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Proud Pants: An Unconventional Memoir
     

Proud Pants: An Unconventional Memoir

4.5 18
by Gregory G. Allen
 
A man recalls his life of addiction, abandonment, and anger as he faces death at the age of thirty-four. Told through the voice of one man, but written through the words of his brother – this memoir novelette describes the troubled life who was rejected by one woman at an early age but found solace in another.

Author’s Note:

When I was

Overview

A man recalls his life of addiction, abandonment, and anger as he faces death at the age of thirty-four. Told through the voice of one man, but written through the words of his brother – this memoir novelette describes the troubled life who was rejected by one woman at an early age but found solace in another.

Author’s Note:

When I was nine years old I picked up a lead pipe and prepared to hit my fourteen-year-old half brother in case he did something to my mother. That brother died two hours after my twenty-ninth birthday when he was only thirty-four. Throughout the years, I often thought about how he shaped who I eventually became as a person. I was always the good kid, straight A's, never getting into trouble and very bent on being a productive part of society — the opposite of the older brother I had when most young boys want to try and emulate that older sibling.

But later in life I began to think about what life must have been like for him. I had always thought he was offered the same opportunities I had been given from our parents but he still had a very difficult life that I never could fully comprehend as a child. I decided to try and get inside of my brother's skin to write this memoir of his life. My brother’s life was a novelette — too long to be considered a short story and too short to be a novel.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780983604921
Publisher:
ASD Publishing
Publication date:
07/01/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
82
File size:
1 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

When I was nine years old I picked up a lead pipe and prepared to hit my fourteen-year-old half brother in case he did something to my mother. That brother died two hours after my twenty-ninth birthday when he was only thirty-four. Throughout the years, I often thought about how he shaped who I eventually became as a person. I was always the good kid, straight A's, never getting into trouble and very bent on being a productive part of society -- the opposite of the older brother I had when most young boys want to try and emulate that older sibling.

But later in life I began to think about what life must have been like for him. I had always thought he was offered the same opportunities I had been given from our parents but he still had a very difficult life that I never could fully comprehend as a child. I decided to try and get inside of my brother's skin to write this memoir of his life. My brother's life was a novelette -- too long to be considered a short story and too short to be a novel.

Gregory G. Allen is an author, playwright, and composer living in New Jersey where he manages an arts center on a college campus. He has had several short stories published and is an award-winning musical theater writer with over ten original musicals produced. His first novel WELL WITH MY SOUL will be out in October.

ggallen.net
facebook.com/author.gregory.g.allen

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Proud Pants: An Unconventional Memoir 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well if greastone cant stay thn im not staying either. Even tho ive been in this clan since it first started. Im just sick and tired of ppl getting kicked out jist because they attack and or destroy a clan. I have destroyed maby five to seven clans. Three to five by my self. Besides a person can only die if they let there caractor die. They can come back its only rp. Ad what can te leadr realy do about greystone posting...i mean realy wat can he really do. Get over it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well oif greystone can stay is nighstar and Ivyhearts desicion after all it was her who you................
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have to he rps my kit
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
(Sorry...got bored. I'll be off.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
solid 4.5 stars . . . highly recommend well written!! heart felt, emotional short. mr. allen does a fantastic job pulling a reading into the emotional landscape he has created. he also does a great job with the POV. first person memoir of a dying man, his brother . . .wow!! trying to understand what motivates a loved one to do what they do is sometimes an unattainable goal. it appears the author has made some sense here . . . five years separate their births, but their lives are anything but the same . . .
MStefanides More than 1 year ago
It would be difficult for anyone to read Proud Pants and not be moved by the story of Johnny’s life, and by the inextricable bonds of family, the lives of Johnny’s family, including Allen. Those family bonds are a study in the cultural shift from the nuclear family of the fifties and sixties to the blended families of the seventies, eighties, and beyond. Johnny’s parents married young, perhaps too young, and quickly produced three children, of whom Johnny is the oldest. It takes only a few short years for the parents’ marriage to unravel; Johnny’s father takes him along when he moves out, and the two younger sisters stay with their mother. Eventually, both parents remarry to partners who bring along their own children. The new couples then have children together, the result being a tangle of complicated relationships between parents, stepparents, full siblings, half-siblings, and step-siblings. It’s enough to make anyone’s head spin, but Johnny seems to feel particularly unwanted and abandoned in the wake of the family dynamics. As he moves through childhood, Johnny struggles with the feeling of being cast off by his birth mother. A variety of circumstances results in Johnny’s being bounced around among parents, stepparents, and grandparents, and even a home for wayward boys, for much of his childhood. Eventually, Johnny’s father settles into a stable relationship with a new wife, but not even the devotion of his stepmother can fill the whole in Johnny’s heart. In his pain and feelings of not fitting in anywhere, Johnny gets into trouble everywhere he turns. He smokes, he drinks, he steals, he skips school, he picks fights with just about every human being with whom he comes into contact. Johnny eventually gets into drugs, and repeats his parents’ example by marrying young and promptly producing three children of his own. He drifts aimlessly from job to job, never quite establishing stability for his own family. It is ironic that the young man who grew up fighting everyone around him tooth and nail, declaring to all within earshot that he didn’t need anybody, was never able to create an independent life for himself and his children. The book begins and ends with Johnny on his death bed at the age of thirty-four. Although he lived a life fraught with pain and anguish, Johnny dies with redemption, finally understanding that he has been loved, even though he was blind to it while he lived. Proud Pants is a compelling book, not only for the story itself, but for Allen’s bravery in writing it in the first person from Johnny’s point of view. It is a difficult challenge to write someone else’s memoir from their perspective. Despite a couple of issues that troubled me, Allen pulls it off. I found the book to be more telling than showing. Johnny describes his feelings, events, and others’ reactions to him in a way that felt like a recitation of facts and conclusions to me. To be sure, he sets scenes and gives examples of interactions to back up those facts, but to me, it reads almost like a textbook that explains the concept of addition, then lays out some problems and shows that two plus two does indeed equal four. What gives me the most food for thought, though, is how much of Johnny’s thoughts and reflections come from him, and to w
KrittersRamblings More than 1 year ago
A great little novelette that took the reader deep into a family's heartache as they watch a son and father die at the young age of 34. From page 1 to the end, the reader becomes a family member and aches for this family as they fall apart piece by piece. Written by the step-brother of the main character, I am not sure that I would completely put this in the genre of memoir, but I would say this dramatic novelette is worth picking up. It is emotional, but filled with truth - I definitely liked this short and simple read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read_A_Book More than 1 year ago
This is a beautiful memoir detailing the life of Johnny, the author's brother, who struggled throughout his life to find his place in the world and, ultimately, pushed everyone away in the process. This novelette is very interesting and had me captivated from the very first page as Johnny explains his thoughts from his death bed-unable to speak to those around him, his mind drifts between the past and present, jumping back and forth to allow the reader to view the whole spectrum of his life. I really enjoyed the fact that this unconventional memoir is told from the perspective of Johnny, even though Gregory is actually the writer of this memoir. It is obvious that Gregory spent much time grappling with the question of what life was like for Johnny, a young man scorned by one mother and loved by another, yet still unable to accept this love. This is a very well written, deep, poignant memoir that I highly recommend to readers of all ages. Four stars.
BookLoverTM More than 1 year ago
Loved this book. It was very well written. Had me laughing out load at times and in tears the next.
ggallen More than 1 year ago
A man recalls his life of addiction, abandonment, and anger as he faces death at the age of thirty-four. Told through the voice of one man, but written through the words of his brother - this memoir novelette describes the troubled life who was rejected by one woman at an early age but found solace in another. Author's Note: When I was nine years old I picked up a lead pipe and prepared to hit my fourteen-year-old half brother in case he did something to my mother. That brother died two hours after my twenty-ninth birthday when he was only thirty-four. Throughout the years, I often thought about how he shaped who I eventually became as a person. I was always the good kid, straight A's, never getting into trouble and very bent on being a productive part of society - the opposite of the older brother I had when most young boys want to try and emulate that older sibling. But later in life I began to think about what life must have been like for him. I had always thought he was offered the same opportunities I had been given from our parents but he still had a very difficult life that I never could fully comprehend as a child. I decided to try and get inside of my brother's skin to write this memoir of his life. My brother's life was a novelette - too long to be considered a short story and too short to be a novel.