Proust and the Visual

Overview


This edited collection considers the role of the visual in Marcel Proust’s In Search of Lost Time and how it contributes to the novel’s sense of modernity. The first few essays examine the philosophical implications of Proust’s quest for truth, taking up analyses of the thing, the body, and the relation between the seer and the visible. The essays in the second section concentrate on the way meaning emerges from the description of experience, as well as the cultural environment in which it is inscribed through ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $90.00   
  • New (5) from $134.07   
  • Used (4) from $90.00   
Sending request ...

Overview


This edited collection considers the role of the visual in Marcel Proust’s In Search of Lost Time and how it contributes to the novel’s sense of modernity. The first few essays examine the philosophical implications of Proust’s quest for truth, taking up analyses of the thing, the body, and the relation between the seer and the visible. The essays in the second section concentrate on the way meaning emerges from the description of experience, as well as the cultural environment in which it is inscribed through the workings and reworkings of certain images and textures. The final essays explore how Proust’s unique approach to the visual has become in recent years the inspiration for other visual practices: film, sculpture, painting, and dance.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author


Nathalie Aubert is professor of French literature at Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Series editors’ preface
Notes on abbreviations and quotations
Figures
Contributors
Introduction

I. The philosophical implications of the quest for truth
1. ‘The secret blackness of milk’: Proust, Merleau-Ponty, Literature
      Nathalie Aubert
2. ‘Un assemblage composite’: Perception and Grafting in Du côté de chez Swann
      Adam Watt
3. Proust and the Analysis of Gesture
      Patrick ffrench
4. Disentangling Modernism: A Common Drive Towards Aesthetics
      Hugues Azérad
II. Proust’s response to the visual world: the verbal semiotics of translation from the seen to the unseen
5. Proust and Handwriting
      Akane Kawakami
6. Images Come Alive (or how to make images with words)
      Karen Haddad
7. Proust’s Picture Plane
      Thomas Baldwin
8. The Art Market in Proust: A Comparative Study of the Treatment of Rembrandt and the Salon Painter Gleyre in Proust
      Sarah Tribout-Joseph
9. ‘Avid Eyes and Ears: Photographic Practice, Perception and Memory in À la recherché du temps perdu
      Áine Larkin
III. Other artists’ interpretations of À la recherché du temps perdu
10. ‘Mais dans les beaux livres, tous les contresens qu’on fait sont beaux’: Marcel Proust, Raoul Ruiz, Volker Schlöndorff and Harold Pinter
      Vincent Ferré
11. In praise of iconoclasm: Reflections on the Improbable ‘Illustration’ of À la Recherche
      Florence Godeau
12. Intermedial Proust: Harold Pinter and Di Trevis’s Stage Adaptation of À la recherché du temps perdu
      Marion Schmid

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)