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Proven Portals: Best Practices for Planning, Designing, and Developing Enterprise Portals / Edition 1

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Overview

Praise for Proven Portals

“Enterprise portals are a key component in supporting enterprise business integration, and this book is a must-read for anyone involved in planning or deploying a portal solution.”

     —Colin White, President, Intelligent Business Strategies

“Enterprise portals have moved from the fringes of business to a core competency in the span of a few short years. This book provides the balanced overview managers need to make intelligent decisions without dragging them into a morass of technical detail.”

     —Marcia Robinson, President, E-Business Strategies
         Author of Services Blueprint: Roadmap for Execution

“Portals have become the ubiquitous format for most uses of the Web. If you are venturing into portal land, whether for the first time or after a few experiences, Dan Sullivan’s book, Proven Portals: Best Practices for Planning, Designing, and Developing Enterprise Portals, is a valuable guide for getting organized and oriented. Understanding the approaches, technologies, and best practices described in this book will help ensure that your portal project is both a technical and a business success.”

     —Rose O’Donnell, Vice President of Engineering, Bowstreet, Inc.


"This book is chock-full of valuable knowledge and practical advice on implementing portals. Dan Sullivan once again gives us comprehensive information and useful techniques for delivering what's become a business staple. A must-read for practitioners and managers alike!"
--Jill Dyché, Partner, Baseline Consulting Group

Increasingly, corporations are turning to portals to foster more integrated, Web-based user experiences for employees, customers, and vendors. By providing collaborative, personalized environments and adaptive workspaces, portals allow businesses to better acquire, serve, and retain customers; more effectively manage production and sales; and empower their staff with instant access to critical information. Focusing on critical elements of portal implementations, Proven Portals combines design principles with a series of in-depth case studies exploring how innovative enterprises, from NASA and Johnson Controls to CARE Canada and Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield, have successfully deployed portal technologies to reap significant rewards.

In this book the author shares proven strategies for:

  • Organizing information in an intuitive, coherent manner
  • Creating a modular, adaptable framework for application integration
  • Developing a robust, scalable architecture
  • Improving search and navigation
  • Implementing collaboration and content management

Filled with best practices developed by leading organizations and portal designers, this book provides practical advice for:

  • Leveraging portals to better serve customers
  • Delivering business intelligence across the organization
  • Deploying effective knowledge management systems
  • Ensuring adoption by end users
  • Measuring a portal's return on investment

Portals are revolutionizing the way businesses handle e-commerce, customer relationships, and business intelligence. Proven Portals gives IT managers the foundation they need to plan, design, and develop enterprise portals for maximum customer satisfaction, improved analytics on demand, and more rigorous knowledge management.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321125200
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 9/10/2003
  • Series: Addison-Wesley Information Technology Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Dan Sullivan runs his own consulting company, does training for Pluralsight (www.pluralsight.com), and has worked with SQL Server since it was first distributed by Microsoft and ran on OS/2. Dan has spoken and written widely on SQL Server.

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Read an Excerpt

If you need to plan, design, or deploy an enterprise portal this book is for you. Initiating a portal project (or rescuing one under way) is an exciting, sometimes daunting, challenge. Fortunately, the craft of portal design is now mature enough to identify the best practices that lead to successful implementations. Examples of those implementations, or proven portals, and detailed discussions of design principals are provided throughout this book.

Part I discusses several elements of portal design, including:

  • Organizing information in an intuitive, coherent manner
  • Creating a modular, adaptable framework for application integration
  • Identifying core portal services, such as collaboration and content management
  • Developing a robust, scalable architecture

These technical topics are complemented by organizational issues that should be addressed early in the life of a portal, specifically, ensuring adoption by end users and assessing the financial benefits of the portal.

Part II examines details particular to three common application areas: customer service, business intelligence, and knowledge management.

Part III summarizes core principles of successful portals and provides a guide to developing your own enterprise portal.

Creating an enterprise portal is a challenging and rewarding experience. With a solid understanding of your business requirements and knowledge of the best practices found in this book, you are well positioned to create your own proven portal.



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Table of Contents

Case Studies.

List of Figures.

Preface. @@CHAPTER = Acknowledgments.

I. PRINCIPLES OF PORTAL DESIGN.

1. Creating Frameworks for Organizing Information.

The Need for Structure in Portal Interface Design.

Organizing Content around Taxonomies.

Visualization Tools for Portal Organization.

Emerging Trends and Technologies.

Conclusion.

References.

2. Using a Three-tier architecture.

Tier 1: The Presentation Layer.

Tier 2: The Application Server Layer.

Tier 3: The Enterprise Information Services Layer.

Conclusion.

Reference.

3. Using a Framework for Application Integration.

The Java 2 Enterprise Edition Framework.

The Microsoft .NET Architecture.

Application Integration Services.

Protecting the Integrity of the Portal.

Conclusion.

References.

4. Ensuring Portal Adoption.

Best Practices for Ensuring Portal Adoption.

Root Causes of Poor Adoption.

Conclusion.

References.

5. Measuring Portal Return on Investment: A Crash Course.

The Need for Financial Impact Analysis.

Tools for Analyzing Capital Expenditures.

Calculating a Portal ROI and Related Measures.

Best Practices: ROI and Other Financial Impact Measures.

Conclusion.

References.

II. THE VARIETY OF PORTALS.

6. Characteristics of Effective E-Commerce Portals.

Customer Trust.

Ease of Use.

Multichannel Integration.

Customer Retention.

Support for Self-Service.

Conclusion.

References.

7. Delivering Business Intelligence and Analytics on Demand.

Understanding Operations: Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing.

Characteristics of Data Warehouses.

The Data Warehouse Environment.

Facilitating Operations: Analytic Services.

Conclusion.

References.

8. Effective Knowledge Management Techniques.

Types of Information.

Search Functions: The First Step.

Metadata: Know What It's All About.

Expert Directories: Connecting People to People.

Conclusion.

References.

III. BUILDING YOUR OWN PROVEN PORTAL.

9. Five common Themes in Proven Portals.

Focus on Business Processes.

Emphasis on Easy of Use.

Deep Integration of Applications.

Scalability of Services.

Well-Developed Security Models.

Conclusion.

References.

10. Implementing Your Proven Portal.

Understanding the Business Drivers.

Designing the Portal.

Assessing the Return on Investment.

Incrementally Implementing and Adapting the Portal.

Conclusion.

References.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Preface

If you need to plan, design, or deploy an enterprise portal this book is for you. Initiating a portal project (or rescuing one under way) is an exciting, sometimes daunting, challenge. Fortunately, the craft of portal design is now mature enough to identify the best practices that lead to successful implementations. Examples of those implementations, or proven portals, and detailed discussions of design principals are provided throughout this book.

Part I discusses several elements of portal design, including:

  • Organizing information in an intuitive, coherent manner
  • Creating a modular, adaptable framework for application integration
  • Identifying core portal services, such as collaboration and content management
  • Developing a robust, scalable architecture

These technical topics are complemented by organizational issues that should be addressed early in the life of a portal, specifically, ensuring adoption by end users and assessing the financial benefits of the portal.

Part II examines details particular to three common application areas: customer service, business intelligence, and knowledge management.

Part III summarizes core principles of successful portals and provides a guide to developing your own enterprise portal.

Creating an enterprise portal is a challenging and rewarding experience. With a solid understanding of your business requirements and knowledge of the best practices found in this book, you are well positioned to create your own proven portal.

Read More Show Less

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2003

    Hits All the Main Issues

    Excellent management level discussion of what is involved in making an enterprise portal. Sullivan focuses on the salient issues, without getting bogged down in arguments over technical choices. Like do we use IBM's dB2 or Oracle? Do we use a J2EE or .NET environment? While these are important concerns, the basic design concepts are at a higher level, and are addressed in the book. A substantial portion of which is devoted to searching. Not surprising, because a commonality across most portals in aggregating information that can be searched. Why not just use Google for this portion of the portal, you might ask? Well, Google indexes the public Web. Most corporate portals also, and hopefully more germanely, can access internal corporate documents, including email, that the outside world cannot reach. But this leads into something which you should be aware of if you find yourself designing searches for your portal. Google sells a piece of hardware that sits inside your firewall. It can index and search your internal data, and present the results in a similar fashion to what it does for the Web. Sullivan does not mention this, because he is not plugging any particular vendor. Fair enough. So let me mention it. Because it is useful to know of this option, since it offers a quick, easy implementation of internal search on your portal.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2008

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