Proxy [NOOK Book]

Overview

“Put down what you’re doing and read this book. Right now. The complex characters, intricate world, and blistering pace are off-the-charts amazing.” —Marie Lu, author of the Legend trilogy

Syd’s life is not his own. As a proxy he must to pay for someone else's crimes. When his patron Knox crashes a car and kills someone, Syd is branded and sentenced to death. The boys realize the only way to beat the system is to save each other so they flee. ...
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Proxy

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Overview

“Put down what you’re doing and read this book. Right now. The complex characters, intricate world, and blistering pace are off-the-charts amazing.” —Marie Lu, author of the Legend trilogy

Syd’s life is not his own. As a proxy he must to pay for someone else's crimes. When his patron Knox crashes a car and kills someone, Syd is branded and sentenced to death. The boys realize the only way to beat the system is to save each other so they flee. The ensuing cross-country chase will uncover a secret society of rebels, test the boys' resolve, and shine a blinding light onto a world of those who owe and those who pay.
This fast-paced thrill ride of a novel is full of breakneck action, shocking twists and heart-hammering suspense that will have readers gasping until the very last page.

This edition includes a exclusive bonus story featuring Syd and Knox!

“Looking for an awesome YA summer read? Look no further than Alex London’s Proxy.” —EW.com

Whipping Boy + Blade Runner with a sprinkling of The Hunger Games (plus, of course, a dash of A Tale of Two Cities) = a treat for teen SF fans.” —Kirkus Reviews
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Knox was born to almost unimaginable privilege. He has immense wealth at his fingertips, but perhaps even more significantly, this youthful Patron has a Proxy. If Knox misbehaves, Syd is punished, even if that punishment is execution. At some point, Knox recognizes the incongruity of his situation and the tragedy of Syd's. Together, they run away. But in this singular dystopian novel, their newly shared fugitive state is only the beginning of a wild and dangerous education. A natural for fans of books like The Whipping Boy and The Hunger Games.

Publishers Weekly
London (the Accidental Adventures series) moves from middle-grade to YA with an entertaining throwback to ’70s dystopias like Logan’s Run, offering intriguing moral dilemmas amid breakneck action. Knox is a spoiled rich kid who spends his time doing drugs, seducing girls, and occasionally stealing a car for a joyride. He has nothing to worry about, because whenever he gets in trouble, it’s his Proxy—a slum resident and tech genius named Syd—who pays the price, since he’s tied to Knox as a result of crippling debt he was born into. When Knox’s recklessness gets his latest conquest killed, the consequences and the boys’ reactions lead to fast-paced chases, conspiratorial revelations, and assorted twists. London has no qualms about killing off his characters, major or minor, and the matter-of-fact presence of a gay lead (Syd) in an action-driven story is welcome and overdue. Some scenes (like Syd’s early escape from “justice”) over-rely on coincidence or tech that fails in just the right way, but the novel’s ethical questions, tense relationships, and exciting battles will carry readers swiftly through. Ages 12–up. Agent: Robert Guinsler, Sterling Lord Literistic. (June)
VOYA - Elaine Gass Hirsch
Knox and Syd live in an advanced technological society where the social order includes Patrons, who are the wealthy, privileged elite, and the underclass Proxies. Their lives have been interconnected since childhood, with Syd suffering electroshock punishment and forced labor when Knox misbehaves or is reckless. This is because Proxies substitute for Patrons when punishment is bestowed in this culture, and Syd is Knox's Proxy. This societal arrangement reaches a critical turning point, however, when a young woman is killed in a dramatic car accident while Knox is driving, and Syd is sentenced to death. Proxy is a fast-paced dystopian novel which should appeal to readers of the Hunger Games and other books with themes which question the assumed social order and view society with a critical eye. The value of friendship and the ability of individuals to create change in the world resonate in this story, while the action and intrigue engage the reader. Alex London is a former librarian and journalist who now writes full-time for adults, children, and teens. Reviewer: Elaine Gass Hirsch
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up—Knox is a "patron," a privileged and wealthy citizen of Mountain City. His only concerns are hacking, scoring with girls, and causing trouble while angering his bigwig dad. His proxy, a person who is contractually obligated to serve out Knox's punishments, is a gay teen. In exchange for working as a proxy, Syd is able to pay off his debts. When Knox accidentally kills a girl, 16 years at the Old Sterling Work Colony is too great a punishment for Syd to bear, so he escapes. An action-packed thrill ride ensues where Syd meets up with Knox, who helps him flee. As the pair dive further into their escape plan, new truths are revealed and a growing birthmark that preoccupies Syd turns out to be a secret message uploaded into his DNA by his father. Proxy is full of plot twists, and London creates a well-developed dystopian world. Initially, readers will have to overlook coincidental circumstances, such as the fact that Syd and Knox meet when their society forbids it and that they both play important roles in their world. However, the story's rhythm and complexities rush readers through these liberties, and London's novel will grab readers. Recommend it to students who are interested in tech-laden, dystopian science fiction.—Adrienne L. Strock, Chicago Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
Sixteen-year-old Syd is a good guy; but he's "proxy" to a "patron," so Syd has to pay for someone else's crimes. In a post-apocalyptic, near future, gay teen Sydney Carton was a "swampcat" orphan from the eastern wastes of what was once America. The Benevolent Society rescued him, named him after the Dickens character and charged him for the rescue as well as his future education. (Two other orphans are named Tom Sawyer and Atticus Finch.) To repay that debt, they assigned him to be a proxy for Knox Brindle, whose father runs the powerful SecuriTech company. Whenever Knox acts up, Syd is punished, sometimes violently. When Knox's antics kill a girl, Syd's sentenced to years of hard labor on top of the debt he still owes. Fed up, Syd escapes and accidentally comes face to face with Knox, who's beginning to wonder if he isn't the one who owes a debt to his proxy. As the boys avoid the Guardians, they discover that the secret to forgiving everyone's debts may be in Syd's blood. Accidental Adventures author London drops his first initial for his teen debut, a smart, stylish science-fiction thriller that deftly weaves big issues like guilt, accidents of birth, redemption and commerce into a page-turning read. Whipping Boy + Blade Runner with a sprinkling of The Hunger Games (plus, of course, a dash of A Tale of Two Cities) = a treat for teen SF fans. (Science fiction. 12 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101625859
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 6/18/2013
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 25,651
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Alex London writes books for adults, children and teens. At one time a journalist who traveled the world reporting from conflict zones and refugee camps, he now is a full time novelist living in Brooklyn. You can visit Alex London at www.calexanderlondon.com
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Read an Excerpt

PROXY
 
 
 
 
By Alex London
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“Both were being denied their childhoods: the prince by a smothering excess of privilege, [the whipping boy] by none at all.”—Sid Fleischman
 
 
 
“In the… landscape ahead, you will either create the software or you will be the software.” —Douglas Rushkoff
1
Even a perfect machine wasn’t built to go this fast.
Knox knew it, but still he pressed harder on the accelerator. Ripples of heat blurred the air around the car, and the girl in the passenger seat squealed.
Terror? Delight? Did it matter?
He took a turn too sharply, felt the stabilizer engine straining. His windshield lit up with warnings: lane markers flashing red, speed indicators blinking. Sweat beaded on his upper lip, but the car held the road.
“R U glitched?” popped up in his datastream in translucent green letters. He could see through them to the pavement, but they were impossible to ignore.
He glanced at the girl, giggling to cover her nerves.
They curved up the speedway, slicing like heat lightning over the slums of the Lower City, past the blast-barriers and security fences, rising higher and higher. There were parts of the Mountain City you just didn’t go if you were lux, parts you didn’t even see. The city below them blurred. The city beside them gleamed. Knox accelerated.
“srsly?!” blinked double-sized in front of Knox, each letter wiggling and changing colors. The font was chunky; the y swished like a cat’s tail. Very retro. Probably custom made for her by some trendy for-hire coder. Her hands waved in the air in front of the windshield, swiping out another text.“ :) ” she added.
Suddenly, her smiley face vanished.
“Reduce Speed…Reduce Speed…Reduce Speed…” scrolled in front of Knox in an unfriendly industrial font. All the road signs and advertisements now said the same thing: “Danger Danger Danger.”
Knox waved off the Augmented Reality hook up. You weren’t supposed to be able to turn it off, but Knox had yet to find a security system he couldn’t hack. AR driving was for amateurs and accountants anyway. He gunned the car forward. The speed pressed him against the auto-cooled leather seats.
“You even know how to drive?” the girl cried out loud, her voice shrill and excited.
Knox didn’t say a word. He liked to let the growl of the engine do the talking.
He also couldn’t remember the girl’s name.
Amy? Pam?
Something old fashioned. He shot her another glance, his emerald eyes flashing mischief. He smirked.
That usually did the trick.
She was new in Mr. Kumar’s History of Robotics class, a transfer from home schooling. She liked the animations Knox hacked onto the public display on top of their teacher’s scowling face. Sometimes Knox gave Mr. Kumar devil horns or a top hat or made it look like he was lecturing them from a seedy strip club in the lower city. The girl had complimented Knox’s work on her first day at school.
Mr. Kumar never had any idea his image had been hacked. He just talked away from his wood paneled office at EduCorp. He couldn’t figure out why the kids always laughed so hard at his lectures. Not that he could do anything about it. They were all paying customers and could laugh all they wanted. That was a perk of going to a top-tier Patron school. The customer was always right.
Knox had a knack for hacking datastreams, but school wasn’t really his thing. He could do the work when he wanted, when he had the right motivation, but grades weren’t it. A girl, any girl really, now that was good motivation.
Curvy, skinny, smart, dumb, Retroprep or NeoBuddhist, Causegirl or Partygirl, it didn’t matter to him. They all had something beautiful in them. He loved finding out what it was. And they loved letting him.
Knox knew his assets. With a few little hacks of a holo projection or two, a green-eyed wink and a lop-sided smirk, he could get most girls to do anything.
Well, almost anything. Absolutely anything would take this drive in the borrowed silver CX-30 and an after-hours tour of the Patron’s Zoo on the edge of the city. Girls loved extinct animals, didn’t they?
Scare them with a few hairpin turns, show them a live polar bear and some real penguins and then, cue the melting into his arms. This wasn’t his first time down this road.
“You ready to meet a polar bear?” he asked her.
She giggled again.
“What’s so funny? Polar bears were deadly creatures. Carnivorous, fearless, and wild. You have to be careful around them.”
“Sounds like someone I know.”
“Me?” he feigned innocence. “I’m harmless as a puppy dog.”
“Yeah, but are you housebroken?”
Oh yes, Knox liked this one.
Emily? Ann? Sue?
He couldn’t ask her now. If they were at one his father’s parties he could introduce her to people, get her to say her name to the Vice President of Birla Nanotech or something. But it was just the two of them in the car and it would be just the two of them at the zoo. What did names matter, anyway? Knox didn’t plan to do much talking.
He swiped through his datastream, clutching the wheel with just his palms, and locked onto a holo of a long-faced puppy, its tail wagging and its little pink tongue hanging out. It bounded to her side of the windshield and licked her in 3D. She laughed. It was an old stock pic; he’d used it a thousand times before, but it never failed him.
She waved her fingers around the glowing projection in the air and tossed a text back to Knox.
CUTE, lit up on the windshield in front of him.
She wasn’t just talking about the puppy. Knox half-smiled and bit down on his lower lip.
She noticed. He was watching the road, but he knew that she noticed.
Alice? Debbie?
Her mother was on one of those Benevolent Committees. Saving the orphans or matching organ donors or something. Maybe both. They’d go well together. Her father was a mining executive for one of the big firms, data not dirtware. The real value was in data. He was a client of Knox’s father’s company, but that didn’t narrow it down much. Everyone was a client of Knox’s father’s company.
Her father was bald, right? Knox thought he remembered a shiny bald head when he’d met the man. Must be nostalgia, like her old fashioned name. No one with money needed to go bald. He was probably a history buff. Or was that the last girl’s father? It was hard to keep these fathers and their hobbies straight. Charming fathers was so much more work than charming their daughters, with so much less reward.
The girl’s family must have some cred. You couldn’t get into their high school without paying for it, no outside sponsors allowed. And you couldn’t get eyes like hers without some serious biotech. They practically glowed purple. Her dark hair also had a hint of purple, probably designed to match. The DNA install for that kind of work must have been a nightmare for the coders who wrote it. Very lux.
Knox eased on the straightaway. He was way above the suggested maximum speed, and he was way below the suggested minimum age. He’d stolen company property from his father’s private lot; he’d violated the restricted speedway, violated driving regulations. He planned to do some more violating before the night was over. In the end, someone would have to pay for it.
Everything costs.
But really, who would set the access code to a brand new CX-30 Roadster as 1-2-3-4-5 and not expect his son to take it for spin? If anyone was to blame, it was his father. Knox was sixteen. He was just doing what came naturally.
Like the polar bears.
And look where that got them.
“What’s so funny?” the girl asked, seeing Knox chuckle.
“Just thinking about polar bears,” he said and he reached over to squeeze her thigh.
That was his first mistake.
The next two came in quick succession.
The car swerved slightly toward the guardrail when he took his right hand off the wheel. At that speed, on manual drive, it took both hands to keep the vehicle straight. He’d have known that if he had ever taken a manual driving class.
He hadn’t.
He overcompensated for the swerve, jerking the wheel toward the center lane. That was his second mistake.
His heart skipped a beat as he felt himself losing control. If he hadn’t shut off the augmented reality driving, it would have taken over right then. These cars drove themselves if you let them.
Instead, he tried to brake.
Mistake number three.
An alarm sounded. The car jackknifed, spun sideways, and flipped over at 162 mph.
Airborne.
The stabilizer engine screeched helplessly at the sky.
Or maybe that was the girl.
He felt the car hit the ground and roll. The entire universe shattered into blinking lights and screaming metal. He heard a crunch, a snap of bone. He felt like he’d been punched in the throat.
There was heat, an intense heat, and an invisible fist pulled the air out of his lungs and ripped the sound from his ears. He couldn’t hear anything now, no screaming, no screeching, just the blood rushing to his head. He thought he was upside down. Twisted metal pinned his arms to his sides. He felt the urge to laugh. There was a warm wetness on his face and he tasted something metallic.
And then darkness.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 24 )
Rating Distribution

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(13)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2013

    My son LOVED this book he is 15 and just finished his freshman y

    My son LOVED this book he is 15 and just finished his freshman year, Guess what I read it too and loved it! looks like a movie to me.. hunger games and divergent  are the genre

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 24, 2013

    Fast-paced, thrilling, & smart. A perfect summer (or any oth

    Fast-paced, thrilling, & smart. A perfect summer (or any other time) read for fans of sci-fi/dystopian fiction. 

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2013

    Thumbs Down :(

    I was so excited about this book. The overview that is given is better than the book itself. I read the hunger games and this book isn't similar. Proxy has what a guess you could call a syfi element with the amount of futuristic jargon the author throws around. It is set in the future. They use the word "lux" way to much to describe anything posh. And apparently the aurhor thinks abbreviation makes words futuristic? Like advos & transpo. Knox throughout the entire book seems like a fool who doesn't react to anything at all, he just freezes up when something happens. And Syd the proxy is a chaper 11 which in this book means he's gay. So there are elements of homosexuality within the book as well. It could have been way better. I was disappointed.

    3 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    By Juan Rader Bas, author of Back Kicks And Broken Promises In

    By Juan Rader Bas, author of Back Kicks And Broken Promises

    In a word, Alex London's Proxy is 'lux.'

    Proxy is a fast read, with its exciting storyline and (gentle) slap in the face twists. Mr. London deftly executes page turning excitement with efficient, yet, illustrative sentences and relatively short chapters. In addition to the action, Mr. London sends each character on arcs that happen naturally. Nothing in Proxy feels forced and the way he weaves in the dynamic of teenagers getting to know one another, in spite of the life-threatening circumstances surrounding them, possesses something natural that further pulls you into their story. In a word, Mr. London's starring characters -Syd, Knox, Marie - are believable and because of that you feel for them and you root for them.

    Additionally, Mr. London appears to have made a blatant decision to diversify in the ethnicities of his characters and the trappings of his novel. Yet, he does this without stereotype or alienation. There is nothing token about Mr. London's work. Yiddish plays a big part in the novel. Marie's father's name is Dr. Xiao Alvarez. There is a (secondary) major character with dreadlocks. Syd is described as having darker skin. One of the teachers in Syd's school is Indian and so too might be Mr. Baram, Syd's friend and employer; although with what you'll learn about him, he could be Israeli or Jewish. Moreover, while you can identify who the bad guys are and who the good guys are, each character is complex in that they all show traits and reactions from both sides of the right/wrong spectrum.

    I didn't know, when I finished reading Proxy, if it was a standalone novel or the first in a series. After reading the final sentence, I hoped it was a standalone. The ending of Proxy is so powerful that I liked the idea of the reader having to think about and decide for him or herself what happens to the characters and the world in which they live. Such is the skill with which Mr. London writes, however, because the ending deftly leaves itself open to being continued while, at the same time, the entire story could end where it does without leaving the reader dissatisfied.

    Even though I hoped Proxy, based on its ending, was a standalone, I am very much looking forward to reading the Guardian, book two in the series. If you're fan of of Marie Lu's Prodigy, Veronica Roth's Divergent and, of course, Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games, as I am, once you've read Proxy, you'll be adding Alex London to your list of favourite authors.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2013

    The tension is high. The pace is fast. The world has become terr

    The tension is high. The pace is fast. The world has become terrifying and yet eerily familiar. A great summer thrill of a read! 

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2014

    Best read ever

    Proxy was definitely one of the best reads ever. It is a totally new take on a dystopian society. The characters are stellar and very complex. Alex London is an amazing writer. It could not have been better!! All the plot twists kept me in awe, especially the ending. Let me tell you, I did not see that coming!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2013

    I am very glad I bought this! If you are into sci fi novels or b

    I am very glad I bought this! If you are into sci fi novels or books where the action happens pretty quickly, you'll love this book. Basically, it's about a futuristic dystopian society where the rich (patrons from the Upper City) own the debt of the poor from the Valve. People like the main character Syd who are "owned" are called proxies, and get punished in lieu of the person who actually committed the crime or bad deed. Syd is basically the average Valve citizen, who works and lives at a tech repair business. After Syd's patron Knox commits a serious crime and Syd is faced with equally serious punishment, he plots to escape the city. At this point, most of the action in the book starts and stays pretty fast paced...so I won't spoil it! :)

    If you are buying this for your kid, I would say the age range is right on this one. There is a bit of violence, but it's not very graphic. When the part of the story about the upper city club party happens, there are some background characters who are using drugs at the party. But those are both things that an older kid should be able to handle.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 1, 2013

    Quick fun read

    Quick fun read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 13, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    There is no doubt that this book will be one of the most epic re

    There is no doubt that this book will be one of the most epic reads of the year! Alex London is genius. 
    In Sydney Carton’s high-tech world, those whom are in debt are brand ‘Proxy’, where as the creditor are known as the Patron. To simply put it, a Proxy is assigned to a Patron, and is the one to take the punishments when their creditors do wrong. Sydney is a Proxy – spending years trying to overcome the debt that he needs to pay ever since he could remember … 
    Knox is from one of the wealthiest families. He enjoys living his life a thrill -- surrounded by the latest techs and outfits -- taking pleasure in rebelling against his father. But one day it takes a toll on him – when a friend’s life is risked. He needs to be taught a lesson but his Proxy -- Syd is the one with the death sentence. When unexpected matters falls into their hands, Knox and Syd comes together; not expecting to find out they have much more in common than one would expect a Proxy and their Patron to have. 
    Honestly, after have reading the first chapter I was not prepared to fall in love with this book or even enjoying it. I am a complete technology noob, and I thought it would be hard for me to understand or picture all of these (as I call it) tech talks. But with Alex London’s creative writing, to my surprise it was not hard at all to create an image of it in my mind. As I said, genius. This is the kind of book with a sustaining quick-pace, you cannot help but enjoy; it has everything from enthralling adventures to awing friendships. 
    It’s no surprise that I detested Knox in the beginning of the book, he was so careless, and over the top, even a punch to the face wouldn’t be able to knock some sense into him.  It was like he was not capable of feeling guilt. But as you venture further into the book, it is impossible to not fall for those sarcastic charms. It seems that underneath all those facade and jokes, lies something after all. He brings a new dynamic to the book. I catch myself wanting more of him at every turn of a page. Progress. ;) 
    Having affection for Syd is only natural. He is such a great person.  His hardworking and determined characteristics under his circumstances, inspires and gives hope. It was saddening to read about his dire lifestyle and that he has to lose all he has worked hard for, for reasons that has nothing to do with him. It heats you up. And along with him, you grieve that lost. 
    Oh, Marie! How are you possibly so freakin’ awesome?! In the beginning I believed her role was insignificant -- I did not take her seriously; I felt she had other motives. However, from the time she was re-introduced till the end her support was the strength that bounded all three of them together, Knox, her, and Syd. Living in that world of theirs, and given their different lifestyles … that friendship is something beyond special. Not forgetting, Alex London kept their relationship status vague. I couldn’t tell whether Knox fell for Marie or Syd, and I loved it! It keeps you guessing. 
    I pulled a late night – or I should say an early morning for Proxy. Every time I tell myself this will be the last page, something intriguing happens. Before you know it, I have completely devoured it. The only trace of evidence is the dark circle around my eyes. 
    Proxy had high votes for the most wanted read YA-LGBT book of July -- on Goodreads, and I recommend it. Too good to put down!
    If you are looking for an advance-technology society, with fun characters, and a captivating plot, you’ll do yourself a huge favor by grabbing Proxy. 
    Happy reading!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 12, 2013

    Was worth the time!

    This book had a different spin to it and was not the typical end of the world scenario. It also gave a new character the lead. I was not sure what to expect when I picked this book up but was pleasantly surprised at how much I liked it. I would enjoy seeing what happens next. Take the time and read Proxy, it is worth it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 12, 2013

    When I was first sent this ARC I seemed distrustful of it. It di

    When I was first sent this ARC I seemed distrustful of it. It didn't seem like there would be much, if any, romance and because of that I put of reading it. BIG MISTAKE. Proxy is one of those books that you don't immediately realize you need, but that you do. 




    Set in a dystopian society where the rich can purchase proxies to settle their debts, Knox is a wealthy bad boy that is beyond out of control, and Syd is his proxy. In a world where the poor remain in debt to survive and the rich exploit their debts to get out of trouble, Syd is almost free from fulfilling his debt. However when Knox accidentally crashes a stolen car and kills someone in the process, it is Syd who must fulfill his punishment, except this time the stakes are higher. Finally fed up with the corrupt system Syd decides to flee for his life. Knox who finally begins to fill remorse and guilt gets entangled in the process and they both must set off to escape authorities.




    I love all sorts of aspects of Proxy, from the major themes to the minor details that can easily get swept away. Although it's a longer read, there is not a dull moment. Immediately the stakes are set and from that point on it's an adventure. 




    I think my favorite aspect is the world building, because at first glance although London creates this other society, it's essentially our society at its worst. The homophobia and greed and corrupt government is so disgusting, but at the same time it's described in a way that you can't help but compare to our own society and critique it. 




    This dystopian is filled with action, betrayals, and adventures and....OMFG there is diversity! Not only racial diversity, but also sexuality diversity. It's not just a checklist either, the characters are dynamic and complex and not at all stereotypical. 




    The dynamic of Knox's and Syd's relationship is quite fascinating. It's so complex and it's like this living breathing thing that's constantly changing. As they embark on this journey together, they are constantly taking two steps forward, and when obstacles arise they take a couple steps back. 




    Proxy is an absolute adventure that will have your hearts racing and make you anxious until the next installment. I'm making a bold prediction that Proxy is going to be one of the books of 2013 that everybody will be talking about.




    ARC provided by publisher for an honest and unbiased review.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2013

    Proxy is a great read.  There's a dystopian future world drippin

    Proxy is a great read.  There's a dystopian future world dripping with possibility and we are privileged to watch the action unfold.  There is thrilling action but not gratuitous.  What is surprising is the emotional mark the book left on me.  This is not a dumb boy book.  This is a smart read that didn't forget to be awesome.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2014

    To lazy to type full message here so see divergent

    joshuahester70@yahooo

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2013

    Awesome book

    Great book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    A great book!

    I loved it

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2013

    Looks GREAT

    5 stars

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2013

    This book is okay, but not only is one of the main characters ga

    This book is okay, but not only is one of the main characters gay (which they didn't say anything about in the summary), parts of it didn't really seem... believable. There was lots of stuff to try and make it "futuristic", but sometimes it seemed a little too much stuff. It didn't really remind me of the Hunger Games, either :P

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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