BN.com Gift Guide

Psychiatric Power

Overview

In Psychiatric Power, the fourth volume in the collection of his groundbreaking lectures at the Collège de France, Michel Foucault addresses and expands upon the ideas in his seminal Madness and Civilization, sketching the genealogy of psychiatry and of its characteristic form of power/knowledge. Madness and Civilization undertook the archeology of the division according to which, in Western Society, the madman found himself separated from the sane. That book ends with the medicalization of madness at the ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $5.00   
  • New (8) from $12.63   
  • Used (5) from $5.00   
Sending request ...

Overview

In Psychiatric Power, the fourth volume in the collection of his groundbreaking lectures at the Collège de France, Michel Foucault addresses and expands upon the ideas in his seminal Madness and Civilization, sketching the genealogy of psychiatry and of its characteristic form of power/knowledge. Madness and Civilization undertook the archeology of the division according to which, in Western Society, the madman found himself separated from the sane. That book ends with the medicalization of madness at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Psychiatric Power continues this discourse up to the end of the nineteenth century, and the double "depsychiatrization" of madness, now dispersed between the neurologist and the psychoanalyst. Presented in a conversational tone, Psychiatric Power brings fresh access and light to the work of one of the past century's preeminent thinkers.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"[Foucault] must be reckoned with by humanists, social scientists, and political activists."—The New York Times Book Review

"[Foucault] has an alert and sensitive mind that can ignore the familiar surfaces of established intellectual codes and ask new questions.... [He] gives dramatic quality to the movement of culture."—The New York Review of Books

"Foucault is quite central to our sense of where we are. . . . [He carries] out, in the noblest way, the promiscuous aim of true culture."—The Nation

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312203313
  • Publisher: Picador
  • Publication date: 6/24/2008
  • Series: Lectures at the College de France Series , #1
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 1,025,569
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

MICHEL FOUCAULT, acknowledged as the preeminent philosopher of France in the 1970s and 1980s, continues to have enormous impact throughout the world in many disciplines.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword: François Ewald and Alessandro Montana

Introduction: Arnold I. Davidson

Translator’s Note

One: 7 November 1973

The space of the asylum and disciplinary order. — Therapeutic process and “moral treatment.”— Scenes of curing. — Changes made by the course from the approach of Histoire de la folie; 1. From an analysis of “representations” to an “analytics of power”; 2. From “violence” to the “microphysics of power”; 3. From “institutional regularities” to the “arrangements” of power.

Two: 14 November 1973

Scene of a cure: George III. From the “macrophysics of sovereignty” to the “microphysics of disciplinary power.” The new figure of the madman. — Little encyclopedia of scenes of cures. — The practice of hypnosis and hysteria. — The psychoanalytic scene; the antipsychiatric scene. — Mary Barnes at Kingsley Hall. — Manipulation of madness and stratagem of truth: Mason Cox.

Three: 21 November 1973

Genealogy of “disciplinary power.” The “power of sovereignty.” The subject-function in disciplinary power and in the power of sovereignty. — Forms of disciplinary power: army, police, apprenticeship, workshop, school. —Disciplinary power as “normalizing agency.” — Technology of disciplinary power and constitution of the “individual.” — Emergence of the human sciences.

Four: 28 November 1973

Elements for a history of disciplinary apparatuses: religious communities in the Middle Ages; pedagogical colonization of youth; the Jesuit missions to Paraguay; the army; workshops; workers’ cities. — The formalization of these apparatuses in Jeremy Bentham’s model of the Panopticon. — The family institution and emergence of the Psy-function.

Five: 5 December 1973

The asylum and the family. From interdiction to confinement. The break between the asylum and the family. — The asylum; a curing machine. — Typology of “corporal apparatuses (appareils corporels)”. — The madman and the child. — Clinics (maisons de santé). — Disciplinary apparatuses and family power.

Six: 12 December 1973

Constitution of the child as target of psychiatric intervention. — A family-asylum utopia: the Clermont-en-Oise asylum. — From psychiatry as “ambiguous master” of reality and truth in proto-psychiatric practices to psychiatry as “agent of intensification” of reality. — Psychiatric power and discourse of truth. — The problem of simulation and the insurrection of the hysterics. — The question of the birth of psychoanalysis.

Seven: 19 December 1973

Psychiatric power. — A treatment by François Leuret and its strategic elements: 1—creating an imbalance of power; 2—the ruse of language; 3—the management of needs; 4—the statement of truth. — The pleasure of illness. — The asylum apparatus (dispositif).

Eight: 9 January 1974

Psychiatric power and the practice of “direction”. — The game of “reality” in the asylum. — The asylum, a medically demarcated space and the question of its medical or administrative direction. — The tokens of psychiatric knowledge: ( a ) the technique of questioning; ( b ) the interplay of medication and punishment; ( c ) the clinical presentation. —Asylum “microphysics of power.” — Emergence of the Psy-function and of neuropathology. — The triple destiny of psychiatric power.

Nine: 16 January 1974

The modes of generalization of psychiatric power and the psychiatrization of childhood. — 1. The theoretical specification of idiocy. The criterion of development. — Emergence of a psychopathology of idiocy and mental retardation. — Édouard Seguin: instinct and abnormality. — 2. The institutional annexation of idiocy by psychiatric power. — T he “moral treatment” of idiots: Seguin. — The process of confinement and the stigmatization of the dangerousness of idiots. — Recourse to the notion of degeneration.

Ten: 23 January 1974

Psychiatric power and the question of truth: questioning and confession; magnetism and hypnosis; drugs. — Elements for a history of truth: 1. The truth-event and its forms: judicial, alchemical and medical practices. — Transition to a technology of demonstrative truth. Its elements: ( a ) procedures of inquiry; ( b ) institution of a subject of knowledge; ( c ) ruling out the crisis in medicine and psychiatry and its supports: the disciplinary space of the asylum, recourse to pathological anatomy; relationships between madness and crime. — Psychiatric power and hysterical resistance.

Eleven: 30 January 1974

The problem of diagnosis in medicine and psychiatry. — The place of the body in psychiatric nosology: the model of general paralysis. — The fate of the notion of crisis in medicine and psychiatry. — The test of reality in psychiatry and its forms: 1. Psychiatric questioning (l’interrogatoire) and the confession. The ritual of clinical presentation. Note on “pathological heredity” and degeneration. — 2. Drugs. Moreau de Tours and hasish. Madness and dreams. — 3. Magnetism and hypnosis. The discovery of the “neurological body.”

Twelve: 6 February 1974

The emergence of the neurological body: Broca and Duchenne de Boulogne. — Illnesses of differential diagnosis and illnesses of absolute diagnosis. — The model of “general paralysis” and the neuroses. — The battle of hysteria: 1. The organization of a “symptomatological scenario.” — 2. The maneuver of the “functional mannequin” and hypnosis. The question of simulation. — 3. Neurosis and trauma. The irruption of the sexual body.

Course Summary

Course Context

Index of Names

Index of Notions

Index of Places

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)