Psychoanalysis and Buddhism: An Unfolding Dialogue

Overview

"What a wonderful book! Jeremy Safran has assembled an absolutely stellar group of writers and has himself contributed an illuminating introduction. The essays are riveting and the book is the rare edited collection with real thematic unity. If you think you might have an interest in the intersection of psychoanalysis and Buddhism, this is the place to start. If you already know you're interested, once you look at the table of contents you'll find (at least I did) that you want to let Psychoanalysis and Buddhism displace whatever you were going ...

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Psychoanalysis and Buddhism: An Unfolding Dialogue

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Overview

"What a wonderful book! Jeremy Safran has assembled an absolutely stellar group of writers and has himself contributed an illuminating introduction. The essays are riveting and the book is the rare edited collection with real thematic unity. If you think you might have an interest in the intersection of psychoanalysis and Buddhism, this is the place to start. If you already know you're interested, once you look at the table of contents you'll find (at least I did) that you want to let Psychoanalysis and Buddhism displace whatever you were going to read next."—Donnel B. Stern, PhD, author of Unformulated Experience and editor of Contemporary Psychoanalysis

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Editorial Reviews

Mark Epstein
"Psychoanalysis and Buddhism is an extraordinary book. While Jack Engler's brilliant opening essay sets the bar high for the other contributors, the entire volume is full of wonderful surprises. Chief among them are the contributions of many of the respected psychoanalysts, none of them known for their interest in Buddhism, who consistently defy expectations and push the thinking of their Buddhist colleagues to new horizons. This is a beautifully conceived work: innovative, provocative, fascinating and useful. Jeremy Safran deserves much praise."
Joan Halifax
"This rich and important book is a landmark for both disciplines."
Lewis Aron
"A breakthrough book that will make all readers reexamine their thinking about psychoanalysis and religion."
Professor Andrew Samuels
"Certain to become the emblematic book of this burgeoning relationship, given the range of cutting-edge psychoanalytic views represented, the beautifully edited dialogue format, and above all the urgency of the crisis of meaning in Western culture."
Emmanuel Ghent
What a joy to witness the realization in this book of a first class discussion of the relations between psychoanalysis and Buddhism! Jeremy Safran, after an excellent historical and

conceptual exposition of the two healing disciplines,  assembles an extraordinary array of contributors. Some are psychoanalysts who have been steeped in Buddhist practice over

many years. Others are leading figures in comtemporary psychoanalysis, who have an interest in exploring the areas of overlap, as well as the dissimilarities between the two worlds. The dialogue format of the book dramatically enlivens the text for the reader who is thereby afforded the opportunity to hear some of his or her most pressing questions asked and commented on by a discussant and then responded to  by the first author. The contributors cover a wide territory

in the examination of Buddhism from a psychoanalytic point of view-including the concept that is so difficult for the Western mind, the question of no-self. Jack Engler, in an exceptionally lucid and engaging chapter, "Being somebody and being nobody: A re-examination of the understanding of self in psychoanalysis and Buddhism," and in his response to Stephen

Mitchell's probing musings, provides for us a quite wonderful avenue of access to this vexing conception-No, not conception, experience. Safran has provided us with a book that will be

deeply rewarding to both psychoanalysts and Buddhists; it will extend the horizons of both


Supervisor and Faculty, New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychoanalysis
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780861713424
  • Publisher: Wisdom Publications MA
  • Publication date: 6/15/2003
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 805,633
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Jeremy D. Safran, PhD, is a professor of clinical psychology at the New School for Social Research in New York. He received his doctorate in psychology from the University of British Columbia in 1982 and his postdoctoral certification in psychoanalysis from New York University in 2001. To learn more about his psychotherapy research lab, visit www.safranlab.net.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xiii
Preface xv
Introduction: Psychoanalysis and Buddhism As Cultural Institutions 1
Chapter 1. Being Somebody and Being Nobody: A Reexamination of the Understanding of Self in Psychoanalysis and Buddhism 35
Commentary: Somebodies and Nobodies 80
Reply: Can We Say What the Self "Really" Is? 86
Chapter 2. Tibetan Buddhism and a Mystical Psychoanalysis 101
Commentary: Psychoanalysis as a Spiritual Quest 115
Reply: The Persistence of Spiritual Shyness in Psychoanalysis 122
Chapter 3. The Dissolving of Dissolving Itself 131
Commentary: Imagining Langan: A Transcendence of Self 146
Reply: A Saturated Solution 158
Chapter 4. An Analyst's Surrender 169
Commentary: A Contemplative Response 189
Reply: Swimming Lessons 191
Chapter 5. Moments of Truth--Truths of Moment 199
Commentary: "East Is East and West Is West and Ne'er the Twain Shall Meet" (Or Shall They?) 221
Reply: East and West Are Already Meeting--What's Shaking Out? 230
Chapter 6. Your Ordinary Mind 251
Commentary: Psychoanalysis and Buddhism: Two Extraordinary Paths to an Ordinary Mind 286
Reply: The Path Is Ordinary Too 293
Chapter 7. Transference and Transformation in Buddhism and Psychoanalysis 301
Commentary: Seeking and Subjectivity in Buddhism and Psychoanalysis 318
Reply: Increasing Our Subjective Freedom 323
Chapter 8. The Finger Pointing at the Moon: Zen Practice and the Practice of Lacanian Psychoanalysis 331
Commentary: Where Is the "Spirit" in a Spiritual Conception of Psychoanalysis? 364
Reply: Psychoanalysis as a Secular and Nontheistic Spirituality 371
Chapter 9. A Well-Lived Life: Psychoanalytic and Buddhist Contributions 387
Commentary: Managing Traffic on the Bridge Between Psychoanalysis and Buddhism 410
Reply: Beyond Eurocentrism and Orientocentrism 418
List of Contributors 427
Index 433
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