Public Administration and Public Affairs / Edition 12

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Overview

Updated in its 12 edition, Public Administration and Public Affairs shows readers how to govern efficiently, effectively, and responsibly in an age of political corruption and crises in public finance. With a continuing and corroding crisis occurring, as well as greater governance by nonprofit organizations and private contractors, it is vital that readers are given the skills and tools to lead in such an environment. Using easy-to-understand metaphors and an accessible writing style, Public Administration and Public Affairs shows its readers how to govern better, preparing them for a career in public administration.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205855865
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 3/21/2012
  • Edition number: 12
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 203,193
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

Welcome to the millennium edition—and the silver anniversary edition—of Public Administration and Public Affairs.

It is fitting, on this—both millennial and sterling—occasion, that this edition is more altered than any other. Much has been excised, much has been added, much has been rewritten, and much has been reorganized.

Among the new, seriously revised, or significantly expanded discussions contained in the eighth edition are, in rough order of appearance, the following:

  • The constraint of American government, focusing on the uniquely American social contract and its limitations of governmental action
  • Direct democracy, including the people's use of referenda, initiatives, recalls, and legislative term limits
  • The growing "trust deficit" among American citizens relative to their governments and elected leaders
  • The bureaucratic image versus the bureaucratic reality
  • Why public organizations "bureaucratize" more readily than do private organizations
  • The unique motivations and job satisfaction of public administrators
  • The limitations of leadership in public organizations
  • A new chapter devoted exclusively to public information resource management
  • The use of computers by local governments
  • New governmental procedures to resist computer hacking
  • An expanded and reorganized chapter on performance measurement, program evaluation, and productivity
  • The reinventing government movement
  • The emergence of performance measurement and public program evaluation at the federal, state, and locallevels
  • The limitations of performance measurement, and minimizing its pitfalls
  • Long-term and short-term cutback management
  • Budgeting for results
  • The federal budget surplus
  • Assessing the performance of public administrators
  • Dealing with incompetent public employees
  • The developing professionalism of state and local public administrators
  • Comparable worth
  • The differing career experiences of minority and women public administrators
  • The public backlash concerning affirmative action policies
  • A recast chapter on `Approaches to Public Policy and Its Implementation," which bisects public policy into incrementalist and rationalist approaches
  • Strategic planning in the public sector
  • The revolving door of federal contracting
  • Privatization in the states
  • Local government contracting, including long-term trends and the effectiveness of local privatization
  • The use of volunteers, franchises, subsidies, and vouchers by the federal, state, and local governments
  • The recent rise of the states in the federal system
  • Intergovernmental planning
  • Community federalism
  • Metropolitan governance, governmental fragmentation, and public choice
  • Codes of ethics in federal, state, and local governments
  • Bureaucratic accountability
  • Public administrators' perceptions and interpretations of ethical behavior in government
  • The passion of public administration, focusing on the remarkable career of Robert Moses

Also revised in the eighth edition are the extensive appendices that have made Public Administration and Public Affairs a useful reference work for both students and practitioners.

A new addition is Appendix A, "Publications and Organizations in Public Administration by Specialization," a listing of information sources, journals, and organizations by subfield. Appendix A is designed to facilitate the reader's ability to identify resources that are available in his or her area of interest. It draws its lists from the three appendices that follow, B, C, and D, although these appendices contain the titles of many more publications or organizations than are listed in Appendix A—namely, publications or organizations that are nonspecialized and general in their scope.

Appendix B is a compendium of annotated information sources in public administration related fields. Appendix C is an expanded list of selected journals relevant to public administration. Like Appendix B, it features Library of Congress call numbers as well as brief explanations of the items listed. Appendix D lists selected academic, professional, and public interest organizations, with addresses and descriptions. World Wide Websites for those organizations that have them, and telephone numbers for those that do not, are included.

Three additional useful appendices follow: Appendix E provides the correct form of address for public officials. Appendix F explains what kinds of jobs are available in the public sector (and the salaries that one might expect) and how to get them. It also reviews new federal policies for hiring employees and offers a sample resume that reflects the latest thinking about this format. Appendix G reprints the Code of Ethics of the American Society of Public Administration. Because the society is the only association comprised of public administrators from all levels of American government, its Code of Ethics has particular relevance.

The eighth and millennial edition of Public Administration and Public Affairs represents the field's continuing evolution and growing self-confidence. The developments it reports show a discipline that is maturing, growing more intellectually powerful, and making greater contributions to the society that supports it.

Acknowledgments

In the first edition of this book, I stated that I owed an intellectual debt to at least three of my teachers: Lynton Keith Caldwell, Jack T. Johnson, and York Y. Wilbern. I further noted that they taught me most of what I know about public administration. I still owe my teachers for that intellectual debt. Although it has been some time since I sat in their classrooms, their impact has waxed, not waned, over the years.

The earliest of these unique teachers, Jack Johnson, passed away some years ago. His impact on me was formative, and his advice and friendship are deeply missed. I have since added a fourth person to this small circle: Frank J. Sackton. Professor Sackton (also Lieutenant General Sackton, retired) introduced me to the classroom of the practical world during the dozen years that I spent at Arizona State University. It was a rare education indeed, and one that I shall always treasure. I am indebted to my editor at Prentice Hall, Beth Gillett Mejia, as well as Ginger Malphrus, and Cristina H. Hinkle, all of whom worked hard to bring the eighth edition out on time.

I also am indebted to my colleagues, students, and the Prentice Hall reviewers who have had such a constructive impact on the continuing evolution of Public Administration and Public Affairs.

As always, my wife, Muriel, and my children, Adrienne and Miles, and their spouses, Kevin and Anna, provide the deepest level of support. This book is for them, and the newest addition to the brood, Callum, a grandson.

Nicholas Henry
Statesboro, Georgia

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Table of Contents

Part I: In Defense of Governing Well
Chapter 1: Big Democracy, Big Bureaucracy
Chapter 2 Paradigms of Public Administration

Part II: Public and Nonprofit Organizations
Chapter 3 The Threads of Organization: Theories
Chapter 4 The Fabric of Organizations: Forces
Chapter 5 The Fibres of Organizations: People

Part III: Public Management: Curbing Corruption, Enhancing Efficiency
Chapter 6 Clarifying Complexity: The Public’s Information Resource
Chapter 7 The Constant Quest: Efficient and Effective Governance
Chapter 8 The Public Trough: Financing and Budgeting Governments
Chapter 9 Managing Human Capital in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors

Part IV: Implementing Public Policy
Chapter 10 Understanding and Improving Public Policy
Chapter 11 Intersectoral Administration
Chapter 12 Intergovernmental Administration
Chapter 13 Toward a Bureaucratic Ethic

Appendix: Becoming a Public or Nonprofit Administrator

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Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

Welcome to the millennium edition—and the silver anniversary edition—of Public Administration and Public Affairs.

It is fitting, on this—both millennial and sterling—occasion, that this edition is more altered than any other. Much has been excised, much has been added, much has been rewritten, and much has been reorganized.

Among the new, seriously revised, or significantly expanded discussions contained in the eighth edition are, in rough order of appearance, the following:

  • The constraint of American government, focusing on the uniquely American social contract and its limitations of governmental action
  • Direct democracy, including the people's use of referenda, initiatives, recalls, and legislative term limits
  • The growing "trust deficit" among American citizens relative to their governments and elected leaders
  • The bureaucratic image versus the bureaucratic reality
  • Why public organizations "bureaucratize" more readily than do private organizations
  • The unique motivations and job satisfaction of public administrators
  • The limitations of leadership in public organizations
  • A new chapter devoted exclusively to public information resource management
  • The use of computers by local governments
  • New governmental procedures to resist computer hacking
  • An expanded and reorganized chapter on performance measurement, program evaluation, and productivity
  • The reinventing government movement
  • The emergence of performance measurement and public program evaluation at the federal, state, andlocallevels
  • The limitations of performance measurement, and minimizing its pitfalls
  • Long-term and short-term cutback management
  • Budgeting for results
  • The federal budget surplus
  • Assessing the performance of public administrators
  • Dealing with incompetent public employees
  • The developing professionalism of state and local public administrators
  • Comparable worth
  • The differing career experiences of minority and women public administrators
  • The public backlash concerning affirmative action policies
  • A recast chapter on `Approaches to Public Policy and Its Implementation," which bisects public policy into incrementalist and rationalist approaches
  • Strategic planning in the public sector
  • The revolving door of federal contracting
  • Privatization in the states
  • Local government contracting, including long-term trends and the effectiveness of local privatization
  • The use of volunteers, franchises, subsidies, and vouchers by the federal, state, and local governments
  • The recent rise of the states in the federal system
  • Intergovernmental planning
  • Community federalism
  • Metropolitan governance, governmental fragmentation, and public choice
  • Codes of ethics in federal, state, and local governments
  • Bureaucratic accountability
  • Public administrators' perceptions and interpretations of ethical behavior in government
  • The passion of public administration, focusing on the remarkable career of Robert Moses

Also revised in the eighth edition are the extensive appendices that have made Public Administration and Public Affairs a useful reference work for both students and practitioners.

A new addition is Appendix A, "Publications and Organizations in Public Administration by Specialization," a listing of information sources, journals, and organizations by subfield. Appendix A is designed to facilitate the reader's ability to identify resources that are available in his or her area of interest. It draws its lists from the three appendices that follow, B, C, and D, although these appendices contain the titles of many more publications or organizations than are listed in Appendix A—namely, publications or organizations that are nonspecialized and general in their scope.

Appendix B is a compendium of annotated information sources in public administration related fields. Appendix C is an expanded list of selected journals relevant to public administration. Like Appendix B, it features Library of Congress call numbers as well as brief explanations of the items listed. Appendix D lists selected academic, professional, and public interest organizations, with addresses and descriptions. World Wide Websites for those organizations that have them, and telephone numbers for those that do not, are included.

Three additional useful appendices follow: Appendix E provides the correct form of address for public officials. Appendix F explains what kinds of jobs are available in the public sector (and the salaries that one might expect) and how to get them. It also reviews new federal policies for hiring employees and offers a sample resume that reflects the latest thinking about this format. Appendix G reprints the Code of Ethics of the American Society of Public Administration. Because the society is the only association comprised of public administrators from all levels of American government, its Code of Ethics has particular relevance.

The eighth and millennial edition of Public Administration and Public Affairs represents the field's continuing evolution and growing self-confidence. The developments it reports show a discipline that is maturing, growing more intellectually powerful, and making greater contributions to the society that supports it.

Acknowledgments

In the first edition of this book, I stated that I owed an intellectual debt to at least three of my teachers: Lynton Keith Caldwell, Jack T. Johnson, and York Y. Wilbern. I further noted that they taught me most of what I know about public administration. I still owe my teachers for that intellectual debt. Although it has been some time since I sat in their classrooms, their impact has waxed, not waned, over the years.

The earliest of these unique teachers, Jack Johnson, passed away some years ago. His impact on me was formative, and his advice and friendship are deeply missed. I have since added a fourth person to this small circle: Frank J. Sackton. Professor Sackton (also Lieutenant General Sackton, retired) introduced me to the classroom of the practical world during the dozen years that I spent at Arizona State University. It was a rare education indeed, and one that I shall always treasure. I am indebted to my editor at Prentice Hall, Beth Gillett Mejia, as well as Ginger Malphrus, and Cristina H. Hinkle, all of whom worked hard to bring the eighth edition out on time.

I also am indebted to my colleagues, students, and the Prentice Hall reviewers who have had such a constructive impact on the continuing evolution of Public Administration and Public Affairs.

As always, my wife, Muriel, and my children, Adrienne and Miles, and their spouses, Kevin and Anna, provide the deepest level of support. This book is for them, and the newest addition to the brood, Callum, a grandson.

Nicholas Henry
Statesboro, Georgia

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Welcome to the ninth edition of Public Administration and Public Affairs.

The field and practice of public administration are changing more rapidly, and more radically, than ever before in their history. The horrific events of September 11, 2001, illuminated these changes, and, simultaneously, brought home to Americans a renewed appreciation for the centrality of government.

Ironically and paradoxically, just as Americans are beginning to reappreciate their governments, the institution of government itself is devolving, decentralizing, distributing, and discarding its traditional powers as never before. As a consequence, public administrators increasingly find themselves practicing their craft in settings other than government. Public administrators, now more than ever, administer public policy not only from positions in governments, but in organizations that are quite beyond the pale of the public sector.

The ninth edition of Public Administration and Public Affairs recognizes this new and, we think, healthy reality. Hence, among the new, seriously revised, or significantly expanded discussions in this edition are, in rough order of appearance, the following:

  • Americans' trust in their governments
  • American presidents' struggles with, or avoidance of, their bureaucracies
  • Globalization's impact on public administration Our new era of governance
  • The possible emergence of governance as a new paradigm of public administration
  • The growing propensity of new public administration graduates to work in institutions other than government
  • The unique characteristics of organizations in thenonprofit sector
  • The powerful place of governing boards, and the differences among boards in the private, public, and nonprofit sectors
  • The unique aspects of decision making in public and nonprofit organizations
  • Bureaucratization and public organizations Red tape and public organizations
  • The organizational environment of the independent sector
  • The techniques of clarifying complex problems of public policy
  • Game theory, decision trees, the critical path method, and cost-benefit analysis
  • The widening impact of the computer on bureaucrats and citizens
  • e-government and its implications for public administrators
  • The connections between performance measurement, public program evaluation, and political corruption
  • The new public management
  • How program evaluators deal with ethical lapses
  • Budgeting for results
  • The new dimensions of the federal revenue surplus
  • The recruitment crisis in the public service
  • The changing complexion of affirmative action policies
  • The evolution of public policy analysis Governments' growing use of policy analysts
  • Strategic planning in the public sector and the independent sector
  • The new context of governance: intersectoral administration
  • The characteristics of the third sector
  • New patterns of federal procurement and privatization
  • Privatization, cost-effectiveness, and competition in delivering public services
  • The proliferating public authorities
  • Three examples of the new intersectoral administration: human services, charter schools, and neighborhood governance
  • The rocketing rise of community development corporations
  • Governments' relations with, and use of, nonprofit organizations
  • Americans' faith in the emerging sector
  • Vouchers, especially their expanding use by the federal government
  • Volunteers in government and federal encouragement of volunteers in other sectors
  • The evolution of intergovernmental relations: layer cakes, marble cakes, pound cakes, and crumble cakes
  • The empowerment of the states in the federal system
  • Types and forms of local government, and their scope, functions, and revenue sources
  • The political economies of metropolitan America
  • The expansion of organizational ethics
  • Accountability, humanism, and the ethics of public bureaucracies

Also revised in the ninth edition are the seven extensive appendices that have made Public Administration and Public Affairs a useful reference work for students, professors, and professionals alike.

Appendix A lists information sources, journals, and organizations by subfield. It is designed to facilitate the reader's ability to identify resources that are available in his or her particular area of interest, and draws its listing of information sources, journals, and organizations from the three more extensive appendices (that is, Appendices B, C, and D) that follow.

Appendix B lists and annotates bibliographies, encyclopedias, dictionaries, and directories in public administration and related fields. Library of Congress call numbers are included for the user's convenience.

Appendix C is an expanded list of selected journals and periodicals that are relevant to public administration. As with Appendix B, Appendix C features Library of Congress call numbers, as well as brief explanations of the publications listed.

Appendix D lists selected academic, professional, and public interest organizations. It includes their websites and descriptions of what they do.

Appendix E provides the correct forms of address and salutation for a pod of public officials. This is somewhat arcane information, but knowing it polishes one's professionalism.

Appendix F explains what kinds of jobs are available in the public and nonprofit sectors, how to get them, and the salaries that one might expect. Appendix F is significantly expanded, and lists numerous new websites for tracking down internships and positions in public administration and independent associations. Advice on acquiring an MPA, how to network, arid writing one's resume is also provided, along with a sample resume.

Appendix G reproduces the Code of Ethics of the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA). Although there are many governments and professional associations of public administrators that have adopted ethics codes, ASPA's is unusually pertinent to all public administrators because it is the only organization composed of public administrators in all specialties and from all levels and types of government.

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