Public and Private Families: A Reader / Edition 2

Public and Private Families: A Reader / Edition 2

by Andrew J. Cherlin
     
 

ISBN-10: 0072319925

ISBN-13: 9780072319927

Pub. Date: 06/13/2000

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The

Public and Private Families: A Reader,Second Editionexamines the family through two lenses — the familiar private family in which we live most of our personal lives,and the public family in which we,as adults,deal with broader societal issues such as raising the next generation and the care of the elderly. Consequently the selected readings

Overview

Public and Private Families: A Reader,Second Editionexamines the family through two lenses — the familiar private family in which we live most of our personal lives,and the public family in which we,as adults,deal with broader societal issues such as raising the next generation and the care of the elderly. Consequently the selected readings look both at intimate personal concerns,such as whether to marry,as well as societal concerns,such as governmental policies that affect families. The author introduces each chapter,providing helpful lead-ins to the readings that follow. The 32 readings in this edition are comprised of a well-balanced mix of highly accessible selections from the popular press as well as articles from scholarly journals.

This reader serves as an excellent companion to other texts in the sociology of marriage and the family and as a useful source of information on its own. It is an excellent supplement to Cherlin's text,Public and Private Families: An Introduction. Its 16 chapters,which address contemporary issues such as the history of the family,welfare and welfare reform,divorce and stepparenting are keyed to the 16 chapters in Cherlin's text.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780072319927
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Companies, The
Publication date:
06/13/2000
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
416
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.72(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents


Preface

Part One: Introduction

(* indicates a new reading).

Chapter 1: Public and Private Families

*1.1 A “Quieting” of Family Change, by Lynne M. Casper and Suzanne M. Bianchi. Source: Pp. 1-13 from Lynne M. Casper and Suzanne M. Bianchi. 2002. Continuity and Change in the American Family. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

*1.2 On the Way to a Post-Familial Family: From a Community of Need to Elective Affinities, by Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim. Source: Pp. 85-100 in Ulrich Beck and Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim. 2002. Individualization: Institutionalized Individualism and Its Social and Political Consequences. London: Sage Publications.

Chapter 2: The History of the Family

*2.1 An Archaeology of American Monogamy, by Nancy F. Cott. Source: Pp. 9-23 in Nancy F. Cott. 2000. Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.

2.2 From Patriarchy to Androgeny and Other Myths: Placing Men’s Family Roles in Historical Perspective, by Steven Mintz. Source: “From Patriarchy to Androgeny and Other Myths: Placing Men’s Family Roles in Historical Perspective,” from Alan Booth and Ann C. Crouter, (eds.), Men in Families. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Part Two: Gender, Class, and Race-Ethnicity

Chapter 3: Gender and Families

*3.1 Doing Gender, by Candace West and Don H. Zimmerman. Source: Pp. 125-140 from Candace West and Don H. Zimmerman. 1987. “Doing Gender.” Gender & Society 1: 125-151.

3.2 Feeding as “Women’s Work” byMarjorie L. DeVault Source: Marjorie I. DeVault. 1991. Feeding the Family: The Social Organization of Caring as Gendered Work. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Chapter 4: Social Class and Families

*4.1 Invisible Inequality: Social Class and Childrearing in Black and White Families, by Annette Lareau. Source: Pp. 747-761 and 766-776 from Annette Lareau. 2002. “Invisible Inequality: Social Class and Childrearing in Black and White Families.” American Sociological Review 67: 747-776.

4.2 The Black Middle Class, by Mary Pattillo-McCoy Source: Mary Patillo-McCoy. 1999. Black Picket Fences: Privilege and Peril among the Black Middle Class. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Chapter 5: Race, Ethnicity and Families

*5.1 “I’m here, but I’m There:” The Meanings of Latina Transnational Motherhood by Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo and Ernestine Avila. Source: Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo and Ernestine Avila. 1997. “ ‘I’m here, but I’m There:’ The Meanings of Latina Transnational Motherhood.” Gender & Society 11: 548-571.

5.2 Family Values, by Katherine S. Newman. Source: Katherine S. Newman. 1999. No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

Part Three: Sexuality, Love, Partnership, and Marriage

Chapter 6: Sexuality and Love

*6.1 Gay Marriage, by Steven Seidman. Source: Steven Seidman. 2003. The Social Construction of Sexuality. New York: W. W. Norton.

6.2 Sexual Desire and Gender, by Pepper Schwartz and Virginia Rutter. Source: Pepper Schwartz and Virginia Rutter. 1998. The Gender of Sexuality. Pine Forge Press.

Chapter 7: Spouses and Partners

7.1 From Role to Self: The Emergence of Androgynous Love in the 20th Century, by Francesca M. Cancian. Source: Francesca M. Cancian. 1987. Love in America: Gender and Self-Development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

*7.2 The Theory and Practice of the Pure Relationship, by Anthony Giddens. Source: Anthony Giddens. 1991. Modernity and Self-Identity: Self and Society in Late Modern Age. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Chapter 8: Work and Families

*8.1 The Cost of Caring, by Paula England and Nancy Folbre. Source: Paula England and Nancy Folbre. 1999. “The Cost of Caring,” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 561: 39-51.

8.2 Joey’s Problem: Nancy and Evan Holt, by Arlie Russell Hochschild. Source: Arlie Russell Hochschild. 1989. The Second Shift: Working Parents and the Revolution at Home. New York: Viking Penguin.

Part Four: Links across the Generations

Chapter 9: Children and Parents

*9.1 Why Can’t a Mother be More Like a Businessman? by Sharon Hays. Source: Sharon Hays. 1996. The Cultural Contradictions of Motherhood New Haven: Yale University Press.

9.2 Blood Knots: Adoption, Reproduction, and the Politics of Family, by Elizabeth Bartholet. Source: Elizabeth Bartholet. 1993 (September 21). “Blood Knots: Adoption, Reproduction, and the Politics of Family.” The American Prospect 48-57.

Chapter 10: The Elderly and Their Families

*10.1 Beyond the Nuclear Family: The Increasing Importance of Multigenerational Bonds by Vern L. Bengtson. Source: Vern L. Bengtson. 2001. “Beyond the Nuclear Family: The Increasing Importance of Multigenerational Bonds.”Journal of Marriage and Family 63: 1-16.

*10.2 Men and Women: Together and Apart in the Later Years, by Katherine S. Newman. Source: Katherine S. Newman. 2003. A Different Shade of Gray: Midlife and Beyond in the Inner City. New York: New Press.

Part Five: Conflict, Disruption, and Reconstitution

Chapter 11: Domestic Violence

*11.1 Class, Race, and Research on Woman Battering, by James Ptacek. Source: James Ptacek. 1999. Battered Women in the Courtroom: The Power of Judicial Responses. Boston: Northeastern University Press.

*11.2 Dangerous Dependencies: The Intersection of Welfare Reform and Domestic Violence, by Ellen K. Scott, Andrew S. London, and Nancy A. Myers. Source: Ellen K. Scott, Andrew S. London, and Nancy A. Myers. 2002. “Dangerous Dependencies: The Intersection of Welfare Reform and Domestic Violence,” Gender & Society 16: 878-897.

Chapter 12: Divorce

*12.1 Life Without Father: What Happens to the Children, by Sara McLanahan. Source: Sara McLanahan. 2002. “Life Without Father: What Happens to the Children.” Context 1 (no. 1):

*12.2 “Doing” Post-Divorce Childhood, by Carol Smart, Bren Neale, and Amanda Wade. Source: Carol Smart, Bren Neale, and Amanda Wade. 2001. The Changing Experiences of Childhood. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Chapter 13: Remarriage and Stepfamilies

*13.1: Overlooked Aspects of Stepfathering, by William Marsiglio. Source: William Marsiglio. 2004. Stepdads: Stories of Love, Hope, and Repair. Boulder, CO: Rowman & Littlefield.

13.2 Stepfamilies over the Life Course: Social Support, by Lynn White. Source: Lynn White. 1994. “Stepfamilies over the Life Course: Social Support,” from Alan Booth and Judy Dunn (eds.), Stepfamilies: Who Benefits, Who Does Not? Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Part Six: Family and Society

Chapter 14: The Family, the State, and Social Policy

*14.1 How is the 1996 Welfare Reform Law Affecting Poor Families? by Andrew J. Cherlin. Source: Andrew Cherlin. 2004. (Original article, revised for 4e). Reprinted with permission of the author.

*14.2 Marriage as a Precommitment, by Elizabeth S. Scott. Source: Elizabeth S. Scott. 2000. Pp. 161-178 in Martin King Whyte, ed., Marriage in America: A Communitarian Perspective. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.

Chapter 15: Social Change and Families

15.1 Decline of the Family: Conservative, Liberal, and Feminist Views, by Janet Z. Giele. Source: Janet Z. Geile. 1996. “Decline of the Family: Conservative, Liberal, and Feminist Views.” Pp. 89-115 in David Popenoe, et al., eds., Promises to Keep: Decline and Renewal of Marriage in America. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.

*15.2 Family Change and Family Diversity, by Frank F. Furstenberg, Jr. Source: Frank F. Furstenberg, Jr. 1999. “Family Change and Family Diversity.” Pp. 147-165 in Neil J. Smelser and Jeffrey C. Alexander, eds., Diversity and Its Discontents: Cultural Conflict and Common Ground in Contemporary American Society. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
References

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