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A Public Faith: How Followers of Christ Should Serve the Common Good
     

A Public Faith: How Followers of Christ Should Serve the Common Good

5.0 2
by Miroslav Volf
 

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Covering such timely issues as witness in a multifaith society and political engagement in a pluralistic world, this compelling book highlights things Christians can do to serve the common good. Now in paperback.

Praise for the cloth edition

Named one of the "Top 100 Books" and one of the "Top 10 Religion Books" of 2011 by Publishers Weekly

Overview

Covering such timely issues as witness in a multifaith society and political engagement in a pluralistic world, this compelling book highlights things Christians can do to serve the common good. Now in paperback.

Praise for the cloth edition

Named one of the "Top 100 Books" and one of the "Top 10 Religion Books" of 2011 by Publishers Weekly

"Accessible, wise guidance for people of all faiths."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Highly original. . . . The book deserves a wide audience and is one that will affect its readers well after they have turned the final page."--Christianity Today (5-star review)

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Religious perspectives properly belong in the public sphere, Volf (Exclusion and Embrace) argues, because religions often foster healthy social environments. While acknowledging that Christianity has been historically complicit in coercive conversion, Volf focuses on internal religious "malfunctions" that have allowed such unfaithfulness. When Christians lose sight of their faith's prophetic edge, substitute idols for God, use faith as a "crutch," or resort to violence, they corrupt their faith, Volf contends. Although writing from an explicitly Christian perspective, Volf cites scholars such as Mohammad al-Ghazali and Moses Maimonides to emphasize that individual and communal flourishing constitutes a defining concern of many religious traditions. Volf also engages antireligious arguments from thinkers such as Marx and Nietzsche. With a goal of generating hope for Christian communities in today's pluralistic world, Volf encourages Christians to share and receive gifts of spiritual wisdom, to speak truth in their distinct religious voice, and to live generously with people of other faiths. This insightful exploration of how Christians may faithfully engage today's political and pluralistic culture provides accessible, wise guidance for people of all faiths. (Aug.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781441232076
Publisher:
Baker Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/01/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
349,757
File size:
852 KB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Miroslav Volf (DrTheol, University of Tübingen) is the Henry B. Wright Professor of Systematic Theology at Yale Divinity School and director of the Yale Center for Faith and Culture in New Haven, Connecticut. He has written more than fifteen books, including Exclusion and Embrace (selected among the 100 best religious books of the twentieth century by Christianity Today), After Our Likeness, and The End of Memory.
Miroslav Volf (DrTheol, University of Tübingen) is the Henry B. Wright Professor of Systematic Theology at Yale Divinity School and founding director of the Yale Center for Faith and Culture in New Haven, Connecticut. He has written more than fifteen books, including A Public Faith, Exclusion and Embrace (winner of the Grawemeyer Award in Religion and selected among the one hundred best religious books of the twentieth century by Christianity Today), After Our Likeness, and The End of Memory.

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Public Faith: How Followers of Christ Should Serve the Common Good 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous 8 months ago
Start by asking them,"What do you believe about God?" It works the times I have tried it and I am a missionary.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago