Public School Choice VS. Private School Vouchers

Overview

In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision upholding the constitutionality of public funding for private religious schools, the debate over private school vouchers has intensified. At the same time, the federal No Child Left Behind Act has put new emphasis on choice within the public school system. The debate no longer centers around whether we should have more choice in education, but whether choice should occur within public schools or extend to private schools. What are...

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Overview

In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision upholding the constitutionality of public funding for private religious schools, the debate over private school vouchers has intensified. At the same time, the federal No Child Left Behind Act has put new emphasis on choice within the public school system. The debate no longer centers around whether we should have more choice in education, but whether choice should occur within public schools or extend to private schools. What are the advantages and disadvantages of each approach?

This volume is a compilation of articles, papers, and discussions on public school choice and private school vouchers. Contributors include Christopher Edley of Harvard Law School; former New York Times education editor Edward B. Fiske; Richard Just of the American Prospect; Helen F. Ladd of Duke University; Gordon MacInnes of the New Jersey Department of Education; Eliot Mincberg of People for the American Way; Sean Reardon of Pennsylvania State University; Brent Staples of the New York Times; Adam Urbanski of the American Federation of Teachers; Amy Stuart Wells of Columbia; John Yun of Harvard; and, from The Century Foundation, Thad Hall, Richard D. Kahlenberg, Richard C. Leone, Ruy Teixeira, and Bernard Wasow.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780870784842
  • Publisher: The Century Foundation
  • Publication date: 9/28/2003
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 0.53 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard D. Kahlenberg is a senior fellow at The Century Foundation, where he writes about education, equal opportunity, and civil rights. He is the author of four books, including Tough Liberal: Albert Shanker and the Battles Over Schools, Unions, Race, and Democracy (Columbia University Press, 2007) and All Together Now: Creating Middle Class Schools through Public School Choice (a Century Foundation Book published by Brookings, 2001). He is also the editor of four more, including America's Untapped Resource: Low-Income Students in Higher Education (Century Foundation Press, 2004).

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Table of Contents

Foreword
1 Introduction: The Three Liberal Responses to Private School Vouchers 1
Pt. I The False Promise of School Vouchers 9
2 Overview
Overblown Claims and Nagging Questions 11
The Problem with Private School Tax Exemptions 31
3 Myth #1: Vouchers Raise Student Achievement 33
The Early Research on School Vouchers 33
Recent Evidence on the Effectiveness of School Voucher Programs 41
The Problem of Taking Private School Voucher Programs to Scale 51
4 Myth #2: Vouchers Are Part of the New Civil Rights Movement 61
Vouchers and Brown v. Board of Education 61
Vouchers and Segregation 63
Choice and Segregation in New Zealand 65
Private Schools and Segregation 71
Charter Schools and Racial and Social Class Segregation 81
Choosing Segregation 89
5 Myth #3: Vouchers Promote Democracy 93
Vouchers and Citizenship 93
Why School Choice Could Demolish National Unity 97
Religious Schooling with Public Dollars 101
6 Myth #4: American Public Is Clamoring for Vouchers 105
Vouchers and Public Opinion 105
Congress and School Vouchers 115
Pt. II The Public School Choice Alternative 123
7 Overview 125
Progressive Alternatives to School Vouchers 125
The People's Choice for Schools 133
8 Public School Choice: Student Achievement, Integration, Democracy, and Public Support 137
Equitable Public School Choice 137
Eliminating Poverty Concentrations through Public School Choice 153
Public Support for Public School Choice 171
Notes 177
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