The Public Value of the Humanities [NOOK Book]

Overview


Recession is a time for asking fundamental questions about value. At a time when governments are being forced to make swingeing savings in public expenditure, why should they continue to invest public money funding research into ancient Greek tragedy, literary value, philosophical conundrums or the aesthetics of design? Does such research deliver 'value for money' and 'public benefit'? Such questions have become especially pertinent in the UK in recent years, in the context of the drive by government to ...
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The Public Value of the Humanities

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Overview


Recession is a time for asking fundamental questions about value. At a time when governments are being forced to make swingeing savings in public expenditure, why should they continue to invest public money funding research into ancient Greek tragedy, literary value, philosophical conundrums or the aesthetics of design? Does such research deliver 'value for money' and 'public benefit'? Such questions have become especially pertinent in the UK in recent years, in the context of the drive by government to instrumentalize research across the disciplines and the prominence of discussions about 'economic impact' and 'knowledge transfer'.

In this book a group of distinguished humanities researchers, all working in Britain, but publishing research of international importance, reflect on the public value of their discipline, using particular research projects as case-studies. Their essays are passionate, sometimes polemical, often witty and consistently thought-provoking, covering a range of humanities disciplines from theology to architecture and from media studies to anthropology.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This book provides a top-notch tutorial on the current states of humanities research...
The Shakespeare scholar, Jonathan Bate, has imaginatively arranged 24 essays...Beautifully written....
These short essays approach the core question of value from the different vantage points expected of the different disciplines or disciplinary amalgams. Some start from the polarities of intrinsic and instrumental, others with a more practical social or "lessons learned" approach. Virtually no one seriously takes on the case for economic value, and only a few look at the question from the perspective of employability: what do trained humanists actually do in life, and how does that add value?"—The Times Higher Education (UK)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781849660631
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 1/27/2011
  • Series: WISH List
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Jonathan Bate is Professor of Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature at the University of Warwick, a Fellow of the British Academy and a Governor of the Royal Shakespeare Company. His books include Shakespeare and Ovid (1993); John Clare: A Biography (2003) - winner of the 2004 Hawthornden Prize and the 2005 James Tait Black Memorial prize for biography; The Genius of Shakespeare (1997); and Soul of the Age: The Life, Mind and World of William Shakespeare (2009). He was the editor of the Arden edition of Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus(1995).
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Table of Contents

List of Contributors xiii

Introduction Jonathan Bate 1

Part 1 Learning from the Past

1 Live Classics: Or 'What's the use of Aeschylus in Darfur?' Mary Beard 17

2 The Value of Archaeological Research Mike Parker Pearson 30

3 Why Religious History Matters: Perspectives from 1851 John Wolffe 44

4 The Use and Abuse of National History and the National Poet Jonathan Bate 56

5 Custodians and Active Citizens Robert Hampson 68

6 Architectural History in Academia and the Wider Community Deborah Howard 76

7 'This is a local film': The Cultural and Social Impact of the Mitchell & Kenyon Film Collection Vanessa Toulmin 87

Part 2 Looking Around Us

8 Living Landscapes Stephen Daniels Ben Cowell 105

9 Making a Home: English Culture and English Landscape Matthew H. Johnson 118

10 Accidental Haiku, or Encouragement, Enlightenment and Raising Aspiration Catherine Leyshon 131

11 Thinking about Architecture Iain Borden 142

12 'All this Useless Beauty': The Hidden Value of Research in Art and Design Mike Press 155

13 A Museum Perspective Christopher Breward 171

14 The Value of Music Research to Life in the UK Katie Overy 184

Part 3 Informing Policy

15 Hard Cases, Hard Times and the Humanity of Law Gary Watt 197

The Value of Genocide Studies Jürgen Zimmerer 208

History and Public Policy Simon Szreter 219

'Sorting the Sheep from the Sheep': Value, Worth and the Creative Industries Richard Howells 232

Part 4 Using Words, Thinking Hard

19 Language Matters 1: Linguistics April McMahon Will Barras Lynn Clark Remco Knooihuizen Amanda Patten Jennifer Sullivan 247

20 Language Matters 2: Modern Languages Michael Kelly 259

21 Making Meaning: Literary Research in the Twenty-first Century Francis O'Gorman 272

22 The Value of Art and the Art of Evaluation Rónán McDonald 283

23 'And your point is…?' Chris Gosden 295

24 Philosophy and the Quest for the Unpredictable Nicholas Davey 303

Index 313

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