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Publish and Perish: Three Tales of Tenure and Terror
     

Publish and Perish: Three Tales of Tenure and Terror

3.7 3
by James Hynes
 

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A New York Times Notable Book of the Year
A Publisher's Weekly Best Book of the Year

Combining the wit of David Lodge with Poe's delicious sense of the macabre, these are three witty, spooky novellas of satire set in academia—a world where Derrida rules, love is a "complicated ideological position," and poetic justice is served

Overview

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year
A Publisher's Weekly Best Book of the Year

Combining the wit of David Lodge with Poe's delicious sense of the macabre, these are three witty, spooky novellas of satire set in academia—a world where Derrida rules, love is a "complicated ideological position," and poetic justice is served with an ideological twist.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Entirely delightful . . . wickedly funny . . . There hasn't been a genuinely adroit novel of academic manners since Randall Jarrell's Pictures from an Institution.” —Jonathan Yardley, The Washington Post Book World

“Original, droll, startling . . . Witty and penetrating: Hynes creates pungent satires of academic life while at the same time infusing them with genuine suspense and real terror.” —Kirkus Reviews

“A perfect blend of dark comedy and the ghost story, reminiscent of the best of T. C. Boyle and the best of Poe.” —David Treuer, The Minneapolis Star-Tribune

“Hynes must have struck a pact with the devil when he began writing these tales because their tone is perfect.” —Maureen Corrigan, National Public Radio

“Riveting . . . exhilarating . . . a work of sheer joy.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Deliciously creepy novellas . . . Hynes's writing is diamond sharp, revealing his characters' souls as surely as a Judgement Day angel.” —Amy Waldman, People

Kirkus Reviews
Three original, droll, startling tales of horror in academia, by the author of the novel The Wild Colonial Boy (1990).

Things go disastrously wrong for the very matter-of-fact academics who inhabit Hynes's world. The hero of "Queen of the Jungle," a middle-aged professor in Iowa whose contract is about to run out, is a good example. Married to a tenure-track wife who commutes four days a week to her job in Chicago, he putters about haplessly in the sticks, writing a study of popular culture—"My (M)other the Car: Difference and Memory in Matriarchal Narrative"—and sleeping with one of his graduate students. He's content to let things go on in this fashion indefinitely, and they probably would, but for his wife's preternaturally devious cat: Ever since he brought his mistress into the house, it seems, the cat has harbored some plan of revenge in her feline mind, and she succeeds in finally exposing him to his wife as the fraud that he is. "99" is a classic innocents-abroad tale, in which an American anthropologist traveling in England discovers, to his delight, an ancient Druidic cult in a remote village. Giddy with excitement at the thought of the fame he can command with his findings, he doesn't realize until the very end that he's learned a bit too much about human sacrifice for his own good. "Casting the Runes" offers another comic and original variation on the theme of revenge. A put-upon historian sets out to expose a colleague as a plagiarist—and discovers that there is a more malign (and occult) explanation for his actions than she would ever have surmised.

Witty and penetrating: Hynes creates pungent satires of academic life while at the same time infusing them with genuine suspense and real terror.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312186968
Publisher:
Picador
Publication date:
04/01/1998
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
738,286
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.78(d)

Read an Excerpt

David A. Sousa, EdD, an international consultant in educational neuroscience, has written 16 books for educators and parents on ways of using brain research to improve teaching and learning. He has conducted workshops for more than two hundred thousand educators in hundreds of school districts on brain research and science education at the pre-K to Grade 12 and university levels. He has presented at national conventions of educational organizations and to regional and local school districts across the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Asia.

Dr. Sousa has a bachelor of science degree in chemistry from Bridgewater (Massachusetts) State University, a master of arts degree in teaching science from Harvard University, and a doctorate from Rutgers University. His teaching experience covers all levels. He has taught high school science and has served as a K–12 director of science, a supervisor of instruction, and a district superintendent in New Jersey schools. He has been an adjunct professor of education at Seton Hall University and at Rutgers University. A past president of the National Staff Development Council (now called Learning Forward), Dr. Sousa has edited science books and published numerous articles in leading educational journals on staff development, science education, and brain research. He has received awards from professional associations, school districts, and Bridgewater State University (Distinguished Alumni Award), and several honorary doctorates for his commitment and contributions to research, staff development, and science education. He has been interviewed on the NBC Today show and on National Public Radio about his work with schools using brain research. He makes his home in south Florida.

 

Meet the Author

James Hynes is the author of The Wild Colonial Boy and The Lecturer's Tale, a New York Times Notable Book. His television criticism has appeared in Mother Jones and the Utne Reader. He lives in Austin, Texas.

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Publish and Perish: Three Tales of Tenure and Terror 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Just re-read, and I must say Hynes is the best thing in quirky terror since Shirley Jackson...except funnier. You don't need any background in academia (I haven't one) to appreciate his send-ups of campus politics and scholarly fads.