Puck Of Pook's Hill

Puck Of Pook's Hill

3.1 8
by Rudyard Kipling
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Dan and Una decide to recreate their own version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Finding an old fairy ring, they set about their play. After a final bow, they sit down in the centre – whereupon Puck conjures up the past – a Roman centurion, a Renaissance artisan and a bygone village all appear before their very eyes.

Overview

Dan and Una decide to recreate their own version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Finding an old fairy ring, they set about their play. After a final bow, they sit down in the centre – whereupon Puck conjures up the past – a Roman centurion, a Renaissance artisan and a bygone village all appear before their very eyes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781842329535
Publisher:
House of Stratus, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/28/2002
Pages:
236
Product dimensions:
5.37(w) x 8.12(h) x 0.62(d)

Meet the Author

Rudyard Joseph Kipling was born in the then named Bombay, India on 30th December 1865. Aged six, he was sent to England to be educated, firstly in Southsea, where he was cared for in a foster home, and later at Westward Ho, a United Services College in Devon. A life of misery at the former was described in his story 'Baa Baa Black Sheep', whilst Westward Ho was used as a basis for his questioning the public school ethic in 'Stalky and Co'. Kipling returned to India in 1882 to work as an assistant editor for the Civil and Military Gazette of Lahore. His reputation as a writer was established with stories of English life in India, published there in 1888/9. ‘The Phantom Rickshaw’, ‘Soldiers Three’ and ‘Under the Deodars’ are amongst these early works. Returning to England in 1889, Kipling settled in London and continued to earn a living as a writer. In 1892 he married Caroline Balestier, an American. They travelled extensively in the following four years, including a spell living in America, and it was in this time most of his enduring work was written, not least ‘The Jungle Book’ and ‘The Second Jungle Book’. Kipling once again returned to England in 1896 and continued his writing career, although tragedy hit the family when his eldest daughter, Josephine, died in 1899. Nonetheless, in 1901 he completed ‘Kim’, often considered to be his best work. The following year, having settled in Sussex, he published ‘Just So Stories’, a book he had planned to write for Josephine. Having refused the position of Poet Laureate, which was offered in 1895, he did accept the Nobel Prize for Literature, becoming the first English author to be so honoured. By 1910, however, Kipling’s appeal was waning. His poems and stories were based on values that were perceived as outdated. There was widespread reaction against Victorian imperialism, highlighted by the incompetent management of the Boer War. When World War I came, Kipling had difficulty in adapting to the mood of the public and after his only son, John, was reported missing in action believed killed in 1915, he became very active on the War Graves Commission. After the war he became an increasingly isolated figure, although some of his best writing was to come, with ‘Debits and Credits’ in 1926 and ‘Limits and Renewals’ in 1932. Kipling died in 1936 in London and was buried in Westminster Abbey. Today, however, he is once again avidly read not just for the quality of his writing and storytelling, but through a renewed interest in the behaviour and values he represented.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Puck of Pook's Hill 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Ausonius More than 1 year ago
Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936) issued PUCK OF POOK'S HILL in 1906. Next year he won the Nobel Prize for literature. Coincidence? Maybe not. *** I have just read PUCK OF POOK's HILL. I knew and have been singing since age 12 "A Smuggler's Song." I knew it was by Kipling. But I did not know that it was from PUCK OF POOK'S HILL. The book as a whole slumbered for nearly eight decades without me taking notice. Was it Puck who made me open the book? *** I do not own a critical edition of PUCK OF POOK'S HILL, nor any learned monographs on its provenance, symbolism and such like. But I have detected at least three ways of reading this 1906 collection about southeastern England and the young brother and sister to whom its tales were told by long dead characters summoned back to memory by England's last faun or fairy or Old Thing -- named Puck. *** (1) Boy, girls, adults can at the most obvious level read these yarns of east Sussex County England as adventure tales. Thus a onetime minor Norse god named Weland cannot return to Valhalla till a mortal thanks him for a good deed. When that occurs, Weland makes a singing sword for young Hugh, a Saxon nobleman of the county. Then Hugh and a Norman knight who was given Hugh's estates after the Conquest of 1066, are captured by Norse pirates, become friends of Captain and crew, and sail together to the Gorilla Coast of West Africa where they amass huge quantites of gold. And on and on the stories spin their way into our imaginations. *** (2) Something inexplicably clicks in the historical imagination of the two young siblings, Dan and Una Reynolds. Their simplest hobbies, classroom activities, their reading somehow trigger deep insights into the Downs, Wealds, marshes, history of smugglers and pre-Protestant folklore of their small part of England. As the siblings rehearse together outdoors a scene from MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM on midsummer's eve, they blunder into a formula that brings before them no less than Puck, England's last preternatural little person or fairy. Wandering by herself on a hill reciting Macaulay's "Lays of Ancient Rome" near her home, Una randomly shoots a pellet from her catapult/sling shot into a thicket. It strikes a fully armored Roman soldier named Parnesius whom Puck had told of the Reynolds children. They learn that his family had lived for 400 years on Vectis/Isle of Wight, visible from the nearby Downs. *** (3) What is the agent that slowly synthesizes for Dan and Una the wondrous world of Sussex? Within miles of their home is an ancient mill, a prehistoric forge once used by Roman legions, a 4th Century Fort of Britannia's Saxon Shore, a Norman castle, a 76-year old hedger/ditch digger whose ancestors were there 20 generations ago. That synthesizing agent is Puck, Shakespeare's Puck. As "Puck's Song" puts it: "Old Wars, old Peace, old Arts that cease,/And so was England born!" *** Today, mayhap, if only we can find the right formula, there is a Puck invisibly waiting in our own back yard to do the for us what he did for Dan and Una. Two hours walk from my home in the Blue Ridge Mountains are remains of an 8,000 year old proto-Cherokee Indian village. Two hours drive northwest of here Cherokee-reared Sam Houston taught youngsters Greek and Latin. Later he told an artist to "paint me as Marius," the famous Roman general. Need I add: and on and on? Puck, thou shouldst be living at this hour. And perhaps you are. -OOO-
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Many mistakes in nook version
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
nanNM More than 1 year ago
his 2nd book reward and fairys have more stories with dan and his sister.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Shes got sick puking and pooping i hope i dont get it