Pullman Porters and the Rise of Protest Politics in Black America, 1925-1945 / Edition 1

Pullman Porters and the Rise of Protest Politics in Black America, 1925-1945 / Edition 1

by Beth Tompkins Bates
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0807849294

ISBN-13: 9780807849293

Pub. Date: 06/18/2001

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press

Between World War I and World War II, African Americans' quest for civil rights took on a more aggressive character as a new group of black activists challenged the politics of civility traditionally embraced by old-guard leaders in favor of a more forceful protest strategy. Beth Tompkins Bates traces the rise of this new protest politics--which was grounded in making

Overview

Between World War I and World War II, African Americans' quest for civil rights took on a more aggressive character as a new group of black activists challenged the politics of civility traditionally embraced by old-guard leaders in favor of a more forceful protest strategy. Beth Tompkins Bates traces the rise of this new protest politics--which was grounded in making demands and backing them up with collective action--by focusing on the struggle of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) to form a union in Chicago, headquarters of the Pullman Company.

Bates shows how the BSCP overcame initial opposition from most of Chicago's black leaders by linking its union message with the broader social movement for racial equality. As members of BSCP protest networks mobilized the black community around the quest for manhood rights and economic freedom, they broke down resistance to organized labor even as they expanded the boundaries of citizenship to include equal economic opportunity. By the mid-1930s, BSCP protest networks gained platforms at the national level, fusing Brotherhood activities first with those of the National Negro Congress and later with the March on Washington Movement. Lessons learned during this era guided the next generation of activists, who carried the black freedom struggle forward after World War II.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807849293
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
06/18/2001
Series:
The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture
Edition description:
1
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
1,346,855
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction
1. No More Servants in the House: Pullman Porters Strive for Full-Fledged Citizenship
2. The Politics of Paternalism and Patronage in Black Chicago
3. Biting the Hand That Feeds Us: The BSCP Battles Pullman Paternalism, 1925-1927
4. Launching a Social Movement, 1928-1930
5. Forging Alliances: New-Crowd Protest Networks, 1930-1935
6. New-Crowd Networks and the Course of Protest Politics, 1935-1940
7. We Are Americans, Too: The March on Washington Movement, 1941-1943
8. Protest Politics Comes of Age
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Section of illustrations

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