Pulmonary Embolism / Edition 2

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Overview

Early detection of pulmonary embolism is crucial but diagnosis is difficult, and the condition is frequently overlooked. Pulmonary embolism leads to death in nearly a third of untreated cases, but therapies can lower the death rate to between 3 and 8%. This is an in-depth resource for workers in the field and physicians who may come across the condition that: bull; bull;gives the newest information on Pulmonary embolism and its immediate cause (DVT), including new data on the epidemiology, methods of diagnosis, preferred diagnostic pathways, new medications, and new recommendations for prophylaxis and treatment bull; bull;blends clinical and basic information making it very valuable to the clinician treating patients bull; bull;is fully illustrated and has complimentary tables, alongside a clear concise text, organised logically for the reader bull; bull;is written by a world recognised and respected expert in the field.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"I would recommend this book to all physicians looking afterpatients with venous thromboembolism … .The single authorstyle has the advantage of a consistent format and lack ofrepetition, and the book is very well written." (CardiologyNews, December 2008)

“Paul Stein … has used his vast knowledge andperspective to organize [t]his definitive text … .In thislong-awaited second edition he builds on the knowledge baseregarding this common and yet often misdiagnosed condition. Thistext fills a gap in the knowledge-base of the physician, nurse, ortherapist who cares for patients with pulmonary embolism. By usinga clear and organized format with many graphs and diagrams, Steinprovides detailed information beyond the scope of an online review,but in a readily searchable and easily accessible format. Steindoes a nice job of explaining the challenges of using intermediateend points in the assessment of efficacy. Stein is clearly one ofthe world’s experts, and this far-reaching volume is apleasure to read.” (Respiratory Care, September2008)

“This textbook is cohesive, tightly organized, and has norepetition…It is beautifully illustrated…[and] is my‘go to’ source for rapid reference.” (Journalof Interventional Cardiology)

"A excellent contribution to the relevant contemporyliterature…I enjoyed reading the book and recommend it to mycolleagues." (World Journal of Surgery)

Wayne M. Samuelson
This monograph collates and presents detailed information on the prevalence, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism. The book is meant to be a useful resource for physicians who treat or have an interest in the syndrome associated with pulmonary embolism. As pulmonary embolism is a common and frequently lethal problem, this is a very worthwhile objective. The book is aimed at pulmonary specialists. Other groups who will find it useful are general internists, intensivists, and other physician groups who treat populations at risk for pulmonary embolism. The book contains charts, flow sheets, and diagrams that are clear and easy to understand and contribute to the effectiveness of the monograph. The references are pertinent and current. The table of contents and index are adequate. This is an excellent compilation of the accumulated information on pulmonary embolism, drawing from the database accumulated by the PIOPED (Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis) study. This is a very useful monograph for physicians confronted with the diagnosis and management of pulmonary emboli. It extends and collates the observations that came out of the landmark PIOPED study. Pulmonologists will find this to be a valuable reference, but it will also be of use to any practitioner who works with patients at risk for pulmonary embolism. It is an easy to read and understand reference that would also be of value to students and trainees.
Booknews
Presents detailed information on the prevalence, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Offers information for reaching a bedside impression based on simple laboratory tests, describes the literature upon which a probability assessment of ventilation-perfusion lung scans can be made, examines the validity and complications of pulmonary angiography, and discusses the basis for noninvasive strategies of diagnosis and management in particular patient populations. CiP reads "Acute pulmonary embolism." Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Wayne M. Samuelson, MD (University of Utah Health Sciences Center)
Description: This monograph collates and presents detailed information on the prevalence, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism.
Purpose: The book is meant to be a useful resource for physicians who treat or have an interest in the syndrome associated with pulmonary embolism. As pulmonary embolism is a common and frequently lethal problem, this is a very worthwhile objective.
Audience: The book is aimed at pulmonary specialists. Other groups who will find it useful are general internists, intensivists, and other physician groups who treat populations at risk for pulmonary embolism.
Features: The book contains charts, flow sheets, and diagrams that are clear and easy to understand and contribute to the effectiveness of the monograph. The references are pertinent and current. The table of contents and index are adequate. This is an excellent compilation of the accumulated information on pulmonary embolism, drawing from the database accumulated by the PIOPED (Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis) study.
Assessment: This is a very useful monograph for physicians confronted with the diagnosis and management of pulmonary emboli. It extends and collates the observations that came out of the landmark PIOPED study. Pulmonologists will find this to be a valuable reference, but it will also be of use to any practitioner who works with patients at risk for pulmonary embolism. It is an easy to read and understand reference that would also be of value to students and trainees.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781405138079
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 7/1/2007
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 488
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr. Paul D. Stein is on the staff of St. Joseph Mercy-Oakland inPontiac Michigan. He graduated from the University of CincinnatiCollege of Arts and Sciences in 1955 with a Bachelors of Sciencewith Honors in Physics and Doctor of Medicine in 1959. Followingresidencies in internal medicine, he took fellowships in cardiologyat the University of Cincinnati under Dr. Noble O. Fowler, Mt.Sinai Hospital in New York (now Mt. Sinai Medical School) under Dr.Charles K. Fiedberg and at Harvard Medical School, Peter BentBrigham Hospital (now Brigham and Women's Hospital) under Dr. LewisDexter. Dr. Dexter was a leader among early investigations ofpulmonary embolism.

Following fellowship, Dr. Stein became associate director of thecardiac catheterization laboratory at Baylor University Hospital inDallas, and then he became director of the cardiac catheterizationlaboratory and assistant professor of medicine at CreightonUniversity. Following that he moved to the University of Oklahomawhere he was director of the cardiac catheterization laboratory andeventually Professor of Research Medicine. He moved to Henry FordHospital in Detroit in 1976, as Director of CardiovascularResearch, and in 1994 became Medical Director of the Henry FordCardiac Wellness Center. He was also Professor of Medicine (HenryFord Hospital) at Case Western University and Adjunct Professor ofPhysics at Oakland University. Dr. Stein moved to St. JosephMercy-Oakland in August 2000. He is presently Professor of Medicineon the Full Time Affiliate Faculty of Wayne State University. He isalso Adjunct Professor of Medical Physics at OaklandUniversity.

Dr. Stein's major research in recent years has been in thefield of venous thromboembolism. Dr. Stein initiated the PIOPED IInational collaborative study and is national principal investigatorand chairperson of the steering committee. The first edition of"Pulmonary Embolism" was published in 1996.written over 130articles on pulmonary embolism from among 460 peer reviewedarticles. He is a past president of the Laennec Society and of theAmerican College of Chest Physicians. He is also a Fellow of theAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, an honor reserved forthose who have made a significant contribution to the field ofmechanical engineering. He received the Lifetime Achievement Awardfrom the American Heart Association Midwest Affiliate, the LaureateAward of the American College of Physicians, Michigan Chapter andhe is a Master Fellow of the American College of ChestPhysicians.

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Table of Contents

Preface.

Part I Prevalence, risks, and prognosis of pulmonary embolismand deep venous thrombosis.

1 Pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis at autopsy.

2 Incidence of pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis inhospitalized patients.

3 Case fatality rate and population mortality rate frompulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis.

4 Prognosis in acute pulmonary embolism based on rightventricular enlargement, prognostic models, and biochemicalmarkers.

5 Changing risks of untreated deep venous thrombosis and acutepulmonary embolism.

6 Resolution of pulmonary embolism.

7 Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis.

8 Thromboembolic disease involving the superior vena cava andbrachiocephalic veins.

9 Venous thromboembolic disease in the four seasons.

10 Regional differences in the United States of rates ofdiagnosis of pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis andmortality from pulmonary embolism.

11 Venous thromboembolism in the elderly.

12 Pulmonary thromboembolism in infants and children.

13 Venous thromboembolism in men and women.

14 Comparison of the diagnostic process in black and whitepatients.

15 Pulmonary thromboembolism in Asians/Pacific Islanders.

16 Pulmonary thromboembolism in American Indians and AlaskanNatives.

17 Venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer.

18 Venous thromboembolism in patients with heart disease.

19 Venous thromboembolism in patients with ischemic andhemorrhagic stroke.

20 Pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis in hospitalizedadults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

21 Pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis in hospitalizedpatients with asthma.

22 Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in hospitalizedpatients with sickle cell disease.

23 Venous thromboembolism in pregnancy.

24 Air travel as a risk for pulmonary embolism and deep venousthrombosis.

25 Estrogen-containing oral contraceptives and venousthromboembolism.

26 Obesity as a risk factor in venous thromboembolism.

27 Hypercoagulable syndrome.

Part II Diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis.

28 Deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities: clinicalevaluation.

29 Clinical model for assessment of deep venous thrombosis.

30 Clinical probability score plus single negative ultrasoundfor exclusion of deep venous thrombosis.

31. D-dimer for the exclusion of acute deep venousthrombosis.

32. D-dimer combined with clinical probability assessment forexclusion of acute deep venous thrombosis.

33. D-dimer and single negative compression ultrasound forexclusion of deep venous thrombosis.

34. Contrast venography.

35. Compression ultrasound for the diagnosis of deep venousthrombosis.

36. Impedance plethysmography and fibrinogen uptake tests fordiagnosis of deep venous thrombosis.

37. Computed tomography for diagnosis of deep venousthrombosis.

38. Magnetic resonance angiography for diagnosis of deep venousthrombosis.

39. P-selectin and microparticles to predict deep venousthrombosis.

Part III Diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism.

40. Clinical characteristics of patients with no priorcardiopulmonary disease.

41. Relation of right-sided pressures to clinicalcharacteristics of patients with no prior cardiopulmonarydisease.

42. The history and physical examination in all patientsirrespective of prior cardiopulmonary disease.

43. Clinical characteristics of patients with acute pulmonaryembolism stratified according to their presenting syndromes.

44. Clinical assessment in the critically ill.

45. The electrocardiogram.

46. The plain chest radiograph.

47. Arterial blood gases and the alveolar–arterial oxygendifference in acute pulmonary embolism.

48. Fever in acute pulmonary embolism.

49. Leukocytosis in acute pulmonary embolism.

50. Alveolar dead-space in the diagnosis of pulmonaryembolism.

51. Neural network computer-assisted diagnosis.

52. Empirical assessment and clinical models for diagnosis ofacute pulmonary embolism.

53. D-dimer for the exclusion of acute pulmonary embolism.

54. D-dimer combined with clinical probability for exclusion ofacute pulmonary embolism.

55. D-dimer in combination with amino-terminal pro-B-typenatriuretic peptide for exclusion of acute pulmonary embolism.

56. Low tissue plasminogen activator plasma levels and lowplasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels as an aid in exclusion ofacute pulmonary embolism.

57. Echocardiogram in the diagnosis and prognosis of acutepulmonary embolism.

58. Trends in the use of diagnostic imaging in patientshospitalized with acute pulmonary embolism.

59. Techniques of perfusion and ventilation imaging.

60. Ventilation–perfusion lung scan criteria forinterpretation prior to the Prospective Investigation of PulmonaryEmbolism Diagnosis (PIOPED).

61. Observations from PIOPED: ventilation–perfusion lungscans alone and in combination with clinical assessment.

62. Ventilation–perfusion lung scans in patients with anormal chest radiograph, patients with no prior cardiopulmonarydisease, patients with any prior cardiopulmonary disease, andpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

63. Perfusion lung scans alone in acute pulmonary embolism.

64. Probability interpretation of ventilation–perfusionlung scans in relation to largest pulmonary arterial branches inwhich pulmonary embolism is observed.

65. Revised criteria for evaluation of lung scans recommended bynuclear physicians in PIOPED.

66. Criteria for very low probability interpretation ofventilation–perfusion lung scans.

67. Probability assessment based on the number of mismatchedsegmental equivalent perfusion defects or number of mismatchedvascular defects.

68. Probability assessment based on the number of mismatchedvascular defects and stratification according to priorcardiopulmonary disease.

69. The addition of clinical assessment to stratificationaccording to prior cardiopulmonary disease further optimizes theinterpretation of ventilation–perfusion lung scans.

70. Single photon emission computed tomographic perfusion lungscan.

71. Standard and augmented techniques in pulmonaryangiography.

72 Prevalence of acute pulmonary embolism in central andsubsegmental pulmonary arteries.

73. Quantification of pulmonary emboli by conventional and CTangiography.

74. Complications of pulmonary angiography.

75. Contrast-enhanced spiral CT for the diagnosis of acutepulmonary embolism before the Prospective Investigation ofPulmonary Embolism Diagnosis.

76. Methods of PIOPED II.

77. Multidetector spiral CT of the chest for acute pulmonaryembolism: results of the PIOPED II trial.

78. Outcome studies of pulmonary embolism versus accuracy.

79. Contrast-induced nephropathy.

80. Radiation exposure and risk.

81. Magnetic resonance angiography for the diagnosis of acutepulmonary embolism.

82. Serial noninvasive leg tests in patients with suspectedpulmonary embolism.

83. Predictive value of diagnostic approaches to venousthromboembolism.

84. Diagnostic approaches to acute pulmonary embolism.

Part IV Prevention and treatment of deep venous thrombosisand pulmonary embolism.

85. New and old anticoagulants.

86. Prevention of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonaryembolism.

87. Treatment of deep venous thrombosis and acute pulmonaryembolism.

88. Withholding treatment of patients with acute pulmonaryembolism who have a high risk of bleeding provided and negativeserial noninvasive leg tests.

89. Thrombolytic therapy in acute pulmonary embolism.

90. Thrombolytic therapy for deep venous thrombosis.

91. Inferior vena cava filters: trends in use, complications,indications, and use of retrievable filters.

92. Catheter-tip embolectomy in the management of acute massivepulmonary embolism.

93. Pulmonary embolectomy.

94. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and pulmonarythromboendarterectomy.

Index

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