Pumpkin Hill

Pumpkin Hill

3.5 2
by Elizabeth Spurr, Whitney Martin
     
 
Seeds from a plump pumpkin grew into a huge army of roly-poly pumpkins. All it took was a mighty wind to set those pumpkins off on a tumble that would wakeup a sleepy valley town with a rumbling, tumbling surprise.

Overview

Seeds from a plump pumpkin grew into a huge army of roly-poly pumpkins. All it took was a mighty wind to set those pumpkins off on a tumble that would wakeup a sleepy valley town with a rumbling, tumbling surprise.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Cindy L. Carolan
How on earth could a town be literally overrun with thousands of pumpkins? Stranger things have happened, as readers will find out in this delightful picture book. Unbeknownst to the farmer, a rogue pumpkin reaches maximum capacity, detaches from its vine, rolls down the hill running into a rock and breaking open, spilling its entire insides out onto an empty field. What ensues is just part of the life cycle of a pumpkin. The illustrator has worked in TV and film animation as well as illustrating books. The animal and insect facial expressions and body language that are communicated are comically realistic. The author lives in Southern California and has written numerous picture books for young readers, including Farm Life and Halloween Sky Ride. The book contains step-by-step instructions at the conclusion for growing one's own giant pumpkin and roasting pumpkin seeds, with adult assistance. Could be used in elementary school seasonal study units as well as science units pertaining to seeds and germination (it very clearly states that seeds require sun, rain and fertile earth to grow). Highly recommended.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-When a plump pumpkin breaks off its vine, rolls away, and splatters into pieces, seeds scatter all over a farmer's field. Over several years, these seeds grow into a mass of "roly-poly pumpkins." One day a mighty wind sends them all hurtling down the hill to town, awakening the inhabitants with a roar "as loud as thunder." The "golden avalanche" causes total confusion, but folks don't really mind ("Who could stay a grouchy grumpkin/among those jolly, bumping pumpkins?"). The mayor decrees that every citizen must take one home to carve, and the rest are made into pies. That All Hallows' Eve, the whole valley is aglow with brightly lit jack-o'-lanterns and the scent of spicy, sweet pumpkin treats. Lively cartoon acrylic paintings in autumn colors capture the general chaos of the frenzied townspeople and gleeful children. Descriptive action verbs, lots of wordplay, and occasional rhymes make this book a good read-aloud, as well as fun for youngsters to read on their own.-Sally R. Dow, Ossining Public Library, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Just in time for Halloween comes this pourquoi tale of a pumpkin left to its own devices on a hill, until it multiplies over time to the point of producing a golden avalanche. So many pumpkins pour into the valley town, there are more than enough for pies and jack-o'-lanterns for everyone. The result is a ban on the scattering of pumpkin seeds and adoption of the custom of roasting and eating them instead. Sadly, this clever idea is presented in language that limps, impossible to read aloud smoothly. The cartoon-style illustrations, filled with orange and green, feature anthropomorphized animals and insects as well as a stereotypical farmer and his wife along with diverse townspeople. It all ends with instructions for growing a single giant pumpkin and roasting pumpkin seeds (with adult help). Only for libraries in need of more holiday titles. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823418695
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
09/28/2006
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.34(w) x 8.06(h) x 0.34(d)
Lexile:
AD740L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Spurr has been writing for children for almost twenty-five years. She is the author of many books, including "Farm Life," which was praised as "heartwarming" and called "a natural story time companion" by "Kirkus Reviews." She lives along the California coast.

Whitney Martin worked for ten years as an animator for Disney and Fox television's "King of the Hill." His illustrations have been featured in magazines, galleries, and most recently in George Foreman's picture book "Let George Do It!" He lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with his wife and two sons.

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Pumpkin Hill 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
greatbooks28 More than 1 year ago
I have 2 reasons why not to buy this book: (1) It is not funny - My kids who are seven and under do not request this book. I have to make this listen to me read it in October. (2) Bad illustrations - Six pages into it, the farmers fat wife is shown pointing her finger and snarling and dominating and nagging the faultless skinny husband/farmer. The poor farmer looks like I am soo helpless. I will not read this book to my sons, wrong impression for such a young child to have of a wife. The only good thing about the book are the two recipes on the last page!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a really funny book which also teaches children how pumpkins grow.